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The word musset was invented by the author (Gregory Maguire). Having replicated the OP's lack of success in finding any online definition of the word, I acted on a whim and sent an email to ask him. He very kindly replied a few hours later with: Ah, you have found one of my invented words, employed to make the world of Oz that little bit more unfamiliar ...


8

I'm not sure why Wikipedia says that. Traditionally, a lock of hair refers to hair that hangs together. The word lock has been used this way since Old English ("lock, n.1," def. 1a in the Oxford English Dictionary). While locks can be cut and collected, and lock of hair most commonly specifies such severed clusters of hair, lock of hair can also ...


4

Provided it is open at the bottom and top, it's a combination 'access to the crawl space' and 'porch drainage'. I have done a number of searches based on 'Craftsman porch design', and I cannot find a special name for it. It appears to be a classic field stone arch. Most of these homes have a latticed skirting covering the access to the crawlspace. They ...


4

Pegasean Yes, there is! That word is the adjective Pegasean. The OED gives it the following sense: Of, relating to, or characteristic of Pegasus. Also: resembling Pegasus, esp. in his capacity for winged flight; (hence) poetically inspired or elevated. It provides citations ranging between 1590 and 1988. It notes that we most often now place the stress on ...


3

You could say admitted. The verb to admit has this meaning recorded in the dictionaries: If someone is admitted to an organization or group, they are allowed to join it. He was admitted to the Académie Culinaire de France. (Collins) to allow to enter; grant or afford entrance to: to admit a student to college. (Dictionary.com) To accept into an ...


3

It's a postpositive adjective, poetically reversed from its noun. It's essentially the same as: the entire garden field There's nothing else entire could really be modifying here. The collision with little makes it awkward in its normal position (the entire, little garden field), since it's such a different function from the other adjective. One is ...


1

7 out of 10 is an example of a numerical or numeric rating. The adjective refers to the fact that the value is a simple numeral, rather than relying on words (e.g. verbal scale), symbols (star rating), percentages, or other forms. Here are some examples of the adjective in use: Numerical rating scales are based on the assumption that there is a true zero-...


1

Youngster is a good word you could use. It is not too familiar, and it has an affectionate ring to it. It means: a young person, usually an older child: The scheme is for youngsters between the ages of ten and 16. (Cambridge) Youth is another option, and depending on the context it can be quite poetic. It means: a boy or a young man: Gangs of youths ...


1

Lad and lass are somewhat appropriate if writing for a UK audience. Generally a lad or lass isn't a small child but somewhere between ten and twenty or so.


1

Yes, Hot off the presses is a modern equivalent. Lithographs and posters used to be a means of mass communication, simple and quite direct before fine text. The image and large text would be inked onto the stone as in Litho-graph. In their case "Hot of the presses" where the image was made was literally "Right off the stone." Though they ...


1

Adverbs before the word "scheduled" itself appear to always refer to the time the scheduling was or is to be done, as in recently scheduled or soon-to-be-scheduled. However, 1986, United States of America V. Guzzino - Page 29: "Appellants to the contrary, the court fully allowed them to controvert the government's evidence linking the Pilotto ...


1

left-edge deletion It is a type of ellipsis sometimes called conversational deletion. In these cases, the subject, especially the pronoun "I" can be dropped. When the accompanying verb is "be", that can be dropped also. "Appreciate you taking the time to answer my question." Notice that in this sentence, the verb is '...


1

Floor and Ceiling value Where Floor is the lowest value (minimum) (the ground is the limit) And Ceiling is the highes value(maximum) (the ceiling is the limit) Although it is slightly different in terms of programming language, it makes sense in all other contexts.


1

No, chevronman would mean a man who works for Chevron, if anything. Most people would just draw a complete blank. The usual tack for English would be to just figure out the roughly equivalent rank or calque the differences (1, 2, 3, &c). That seems to be what happens here in the only source I can find that's online and mentions the whole term ...


1

No, as far as I know, there is no similar word to describe a military person's high school graduation 'on their sleeve' in some form of flash or insignia However, In the US Navy, there is the slang term: push-button Since at least the late 1960s, it has been used to indicate a recruit that has been pushed through the ranks based on AP High School studies ...


1

Linguists talk about languages and dialects which are conservative, preserving old forms from the ancestral or "parent" languages, or in contrast those which are innovative or advanced and have new forms different from the ancestral languages. See the Wikipedia article on linguistic conservatism. There is also a related question on linguistics ...


1

'Blinding someone with science' is also used in a metaphorically broadened sense outside the science domain. blind with science (British & Australian) If you blind someone with science, you confuse them by using technical language that they are not likely to understand. [Collins Cobuild Idioms Dictionary] You're also not on the same wavelength as your ...


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