8

I wouldn't call those questions "passive-aggressive". I would say your mom beats around the bush instead of getting straight to the point. beat around the bush - Approach indirectly, in a roundabout way, or too cautiously. For example, Stop beating around the bush-get to the point. This term, first recorded in 1572, originally may have alluded to beating ...


6

If they are all pieces of another published work, See excerpt 6.1 on page 43. An excerpt in writing is a quoted passage taken from a longer work, such as a book, or poem, or an article. Whatever the subject of your writing or the type of writing you intend to compose, excerpts can be used to 'show' readers what it is you want them to understand ...


5

A decade is any 10 year period regardless of when it starts. The time from your birthday until your next birthday is one year even if you weren't born at new years. (unless of course you were born on a leap day) Similarly 2010-04-05 08:31 UTC to 2020-04-05 08:31 UTC is a decade. (although you do run into issues with different calendars having different ...


4

Asymptomatic means simply "not exhibiting any symptoms at the current time". It does not even even imply (absent context suggesting otherwise) that one is infected, and someone who is infected might be "asymptomatic" at one point and later become "symptomatic" (and hence no longer "asymptomatic"). Or someone (a "typhoid Mary") could have an infection for ...


3

Carrier From Merriam-Webster unabridged a person, animal, or plant that harbors and transmits the causative agent of an infectious disease; especially : one who carries the causative agent systemically but is asymptomatic or immune to it The infamous Typhoid Mary is an example of a carrier of the causative agent of Typhoid fever.


2

How about sidebar? From M-W: sidebar: a short news story or graphic accompanying and presenting sidelights of a major story You could number or otherwise label the sidebars for easy reference.


2

The word "insert" will do. (SOED) 2. Something set in or inserted. esp. an extra page or pages inserted in a book etc.; a small map, photograph, etc. inserted within the border of a larger one; Addition so as to dispel the skepticism introduced by user Edwin Ashworth's comment. ref.


2

How about trick question? From Cambridge: trick question: a question that makes you believe you should answer it in a particular way, when the real question is hidden or there is no right answer If a trick question is not a question that "evokes an answer that's a trick on the responder," I don't know what would be.


2

I've looked into this before, and I don't believe there is a specific standard terminology to describe all features of text directionality. There are several different qualities involved across known languages. Just considering those which are broadly rectilinear in layout, there is the direction in which characters progress, there is the direction in which ...


2

How about accepted? From M-W: accepted: generally approved or used. e.g., an accepted convention/practice This seems to fit the bill nicely. It's clearly below official and recognized and above suppressed. It pretty much calls your third category what it is. Addendum: Another possibility is permitted. From M-W: permit: to consent to expressly or ...


1

Wikipedia has an article titled List of largest languages without official status. The OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) glossary of statistical terms defines Non-official language, or Unofficial language. A language that, though relatively widely used, lacks officially sanctioned status in a particular legally constituted ...


1

Colloquial From M-W: 1: Used in or characteristic of conversation, especially familiar and informal conversation Quite simply, it refers to the language people actually use, regardless of whether it is officially sanctioned or not in any way.


1

Take a look at Ethnologue (You might take a look at https://www.ethnologue.com/ (currently behind a paywall) and use their terminology. They classify languages for a living. The OP's grouping may be somewhat limited to political classifications.) Heart language Wycliffe Bible Translators calls the language that you grow up speaking and understand best a ...


1

I think synecdoche is most correct answer here, although it is a surprising example. Synecdoche is not always strictly about a relationship of a part to a whole. A classic example is that an athlete is a jockstrap, or "jock". The jockstrap is not part of the athlete. Another example is where a container is used to refer to its contents, e.g. "He drank the ...


1

From dyad: [Merriam-Webster] 1 : PAIR specifically, sociology : two individuals (such as husband and wife) maintaining a sociologically significant relationship As such, a dyad is a partnership, and each of of the people in such a group would be referred to as a partner: [Merriam-Webster] 1 b : a person with whom one shares an intimate ...


1

For elapsed time, you've got absolute. (Although I think elapsed itself might actually be better.) For clock time, you've got local. (Although I think adjusted might actually be better.) For what people would consider to be a "a day" (5:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.), despite a time change either way that results in that not being 24 hours, I would use the word ...


1

The matter of how you organize your information is off topic here. However the meanings of the terms you ask about are easily answered. Topic means the subject matter of the information. So if your information is about animals, then the topic is "animals". If it is about algorithms then the topic is "algorithms". "Type of content" is a very vague term, as "...


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