25 votes
Accepted

When and why did the word "pasta" become commonly used?

According to Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary, the word pasta has appeared in English publications since at least 1847—but you wouldn't know it by checking editions of Webster's ...
  • 153k
6 votes

What is it called when X of Xs is used with superlative meaning?

The superlative constructions like the king of kings goes back to Old English and it is a borrowing from Biblical Latin (rex regum, saecula saeculorum). It can be ultimately traced back to Hebrew. The ...
  • 55.8k
5 votes

When and why did the word "pasta" become commonly used?

Ngram suggests it was around 1980.
  • 22.7k
4 votes

Is the term "mobile set" correct?

It is an obsolete usage. In the early days of radio, it was common to talk of a radio set, or television set as the device for receiving the communication using radio or television waves. Over time, ...
  • 13k
3 votes

Is there a word meaning both Sentient and Sapient?

The simple answer to your main question is likely to be that there is no single word. If, for an example investigation, we compare synonyms offered by Thesaurus.com in a Venn diagram composed as below,...
  • 25.2k
2 votes
Accepted

Term for pronouns for which it is unclear what they refer to

"Ambiguous antecedent" is the most concise and accurate description of the error you are discussing. Fowler uses the term "principal" rather than antecedent, but antecedent is what ...
2 votes

Delusional? delusions of grandeur? paranoid? Help!

Tell that person he/she is "misinformed". That is not so negative and judgmental as "delusional" or "paranoid".
  • 22.7k
2 votes
Accepted

Is the term "mobile set" correct?

Yes, it seems like "mobile set" is idiomatic and current in Indian English and perhaps some other dialects: Pickpockets take fancy to politicians' cellphones (Patna News - Times of India): &...
  • 59.5k
2 votes

How to make it clear that there is no pun when using "irrational fear" in the subject of mathematics

I think the word you're looking for is "phobia". Irrational fear is essentially the definition of phobia (as someone who has several specific phobias, see also APA Dictionary of Psychology).
1 vote

When and why did the word "pasta" become commonly used?

Supposedly, pasta salad and pasta primavera became popular menu items in the early 80s, which was also reflected in pop culture. Don’t forget the wide range of ’80s movies that reflect ’80s food ...
  • 5,382
1 vote

How to make it clear that there is no pun when using "irrational fear" in the subject of mathematics

I think if you said "No pun intended" it would come out funny on its own. This is not your goal. For that reason you should use another word. Illogical or unreasonable as suggested above ...
  • 4,698
1 vote

Is the term "mobile set" correct?

In USA it is usually called a cell phone. In UK it is usually called a mobile phone. We don't say "mobile set", but it can be shortened to just mobile or cell (9b) The mobile phone is ...
  • 17.1k
1 vote
Accepted

Is there a word meaning both Sentient and Sapient?

As the question is about science fiction and terminology, neologisms would be acceptable; and neologisms are abundant in science fiction. There isn't an established word for this concept. A self-...
  • 55.8k
1 vote

Term for a multi-verb infinitive?

This has nothing to do with the infinitive. It's simply a coordination of verbs, in this case plain infinitivals. Which can happen anywhere you find a verb, or verb phrase. We [divide [and conquer]]. ...
  • 6,519

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