37

I'd call that a Weeble Wobble or Weeble but I think that's a trademark usage of a roly-poly toy (as GileBrt notes as the generic term for one) much like Hoover is not only used for vacuum cleaners that are made by Hoover but other manufacturers too. Whether this is a UK convention though I'm unsure [Judging from comments it's AmE too]. I'm also certain that ...


18

I believe it is called a roly-poly toy. :) Wikipedia A roly-poly toy, round-bottomed doll, tilting doll, tumbler or wobbly man is a round-bottomed toy, usually egg-shaped, that tends to right itself when pushed at an angle, and does this in seeming contradiction to the force of gravity.


6

According to Merriam-Webster, it is a presenter: one who presents something : a person who formally gives or bestows something (such as an award) or who brings something before the public // The presenter of the award for Best Actress was the actress who won the award last year. This site uses an awards presenter. If the people to whom you are ...


6

The grammatical role of for you in I am waiting for you. is that it is an optional argument to the verb. It is not an adjunct. It just happens to be a prepositional argument, not a core argument like subjects and objects are. It’s also an argument here: She came looking for you. I made a cake for you. If in #2 for you seems more obviously an ...


6

It's similar to the use of the words Aboriginal and Squatter in Australia. The word aboriginal with a lower case 'a' means 'indiginous' or 'original inhabitant' but 'Aboriginal' with an upper case 'A' came to refer to people descended from the indigenous people of Australia {with all the attendant bias and abuse that accompanied colonialism}. The word '...


4

Its capitalized to indicate a specific group of people the "Indigenous" Maori's. "Maori" also capitalized as to indicate thier race of people are "Maori".


2

To your first question, the original context would have been legal, and I can find attestation for the exact phrase and similar phrases in the 1960s. A collocation search in the Corpus of Historical American English doesn't turn up "underage woman," but it does turn up several terms related to age-related laws, whether alcohol consumption (drinking, drinkers)...


2

I think the word you're looking for is self-taught having knowledge or skills acquired by one's own efforts without formal instruction a self-taught musician One wouldn't usually use this term in a title, but you might mention it in a resume/CV, to indicate your initiative.


1

you is an object in the prepostional phrase "for you" wait is an intransitive verb so it can not take an object we can not say I am waiting you but await is a transitive verb which takes an object we can say that I am awaiting you


1

This really depends on what you're trying to define, permit or prohibit, and why. For example, the law in the UK relating to using a mobile phone whilst driving is: a hand-held mobile telephone, or a hand-held device (other than a two-way radio) which performs an interactive communication function by transmitting and receiving data. and if the driver ...


1

I think you are trying to borrow a term from computer science (often done) into a business environment. Your familiarity with it, and it's a great idea, has got your thinking that everyone uses it. In a few years I'm sure it will be so but for now I agree with the comment that it is not yet sensible.


1

In contemporary English, "and/or" is becoming fairly common, in both writing and speech. An alternative that might come across more naturally in some contexts is to ask something like "Is the person black or male or both?" There's still an inherent ambiguity about whether you want a yes/no answer, or if you want an answer from the three alternatives offered....


1

The term essential good seems to fit the bill, although I would describe it as a necessary purchase, rather than forced. essential good A physical item required by a consumer in order to sustain health or life. Some essential good types that are produced by business operators include food, water, gasoline and heating fuel, as well as residential ...


1

We call adjectives acting as nouns as NOMINAL ADJECTIVES. https://www.ucl.ac.uk/internet-grammar/adjectiv/nominal.htm


1

Not sure what we're encapsulating as part of the question but if for example we refer to small wearable art such as bracelets and necklaces and the like, or small knick-knacks, the word trinket comes to mind: trinket noun A small ornament or item of jewellery that is of little value.


1

My first thought was tchotchke (or tshotshke, tshatshke, tchachke, tchotchka, tchatchka, chachke, tsotchke, chotski, or chochke) depending on where you're from. A friend of ours has a small store called Chatskies (yet another spelling) where she sells exactly what you're talking about, cheaply made artsy souvenirs and other oddities.


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