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It originates in Homer Iliad 7.219: Αἴας δ᾽ ἐγγύθεν ἦλθε φέρων σάκος ἠΰτε πύργον:And Ajax came close, carrying a shield like a tower: In typically Homeric fashion, the line recurs verbatim a couple of times, at 11.485 & 17.128. Translation is mine for the nonce. The link is to the Perseus Project. Both English translations available there, Butler 1898 ...


2

According to the opening of the guidelines, you should use COVID-19 to refer to the disease, and SARS-CoV-2 to refer to the virus. In a formal paper I would establish these terms at the beginning. I would not expect readers of a formal paper to be confused between the 2003 SARS and the new disease.


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I can do no better than commend Merriam Webster to you. I started there with one of my favourites - "hackneyed" - and discovered several old friends: "Choose the Right Synonym for hackneyed - TRITE, HACKNEYED, STEREOTYPED, THREADBARE mean lacking the freshness that evokes attention or interest. TRITE applies to a once effective phrase or idea ...


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'Electronic Tag' is the official nomenclature. Electronic Tags - Electronic monitoring (known as ‘tagging’) is used in England and Wales to monitor curfews and conditions of a court or prison order. Gov.UK I have heard the word 'bracelet' being used colloquially, but this causes confusion with the other slang meaning of 'bracelet'. Urban Dictionary As ...


1

One of the definitions given by Oxford Dictionaries is 'make a sound of a specified kind'. This is a common usage in informal speech and when teaching animal noises to children: The cow goes moo. The balloon went bang.


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Though not really a word, serde (serialization + deserialization) is composed in pretty much the same manner as coder + decoder. Several libraries use this name: https://pypi.org/project/serde/ https://serde.rs/ https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/Hive/SerDe


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No. As a Maths teacher, I say 'less than' and 'more than'.


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The Dictionary of Wordplay by Dave Morice (2001, Teachers & Writers Collaborative) defines the term "word-unit palindrome" as you noted in the question. He also states that this type of palindrome is called a "pseudodrome."


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While this may not be the right causal explanation, there could be a functional benefit to the asymmetry. "Benign" and "malignant" are technical terms, not widely known; and they are opposites. Making them less similar helps reduce the risk of miscommunication and misunderstanding. (c.f. The Design of Everyday Things on how aesthetic ...


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