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I am debating with a friend about how to interpret this trivia sentence.

When asked how old she is, Jane says:

"In two years, I will be twice as old as I was five years ago..."

Would the answer be eight because in 2 years Jane will be ten which is twice as old as she was five years ago? Or would it be 12 because in 2 years Jane will be 14 which is twice as old as she was five years ago from today?

So, is "the five years ago" portion of the question relating to today or 2 years from today?

Thank you for any help.

closed as off-topic by Michael Harvey, Janus Bahs Jacquet, user240918, Centaurus, Jason Bassford Dec 2 '18 at 21:02

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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it’s about logic, rather than English. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Dec 2 '18 at 19:13
  • It also seems to be about what "ago" means. Granted, a dictionary could have answered that. – Michael Harvey Dec 2 '18 at 20:22
  • There is no "logic" in the riddle, just some simple arithmetic. It becomes trivial once you understand the meaning of "ago". – Michael Harvey Dec 3 '18 at 19:46
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"Ago" means "earlier than the present time" or "before now". It is not used to talk about time before future events. Jane is twelve years old. For the answer to be eight, the riddle would be "In two years, I will be twice as old as I was five years before."

Ago (Collins Dictionary)

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