8 votes

Is there an order to prepositional phrases?

First: some commenters got confused by the technical language in this sentence. Commit here is a noun, referring to a record of a batch of changes to a codebase; the sentence is talking about the ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 15.6k
6 votes

Is there an order to prepositional phrases?

Both are grammatically correct. Your second is the clearer. And clearer still would be The change adds to the change log more info about the previous commits on May xx, xxxx. This version has the ...
PaulTanenbaum's user avatar
4 votes

Word order: Can an adjective be a subject in an English sentence?

In "My favorite is apple pie," the word favorite is, on what I think is the most likely interpretation, just a noun. But more generally, yes, a sentence can have an adjective as its subject. ...
alphabet's user avatar
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2 votes

Is there an order to prepositional phrases?

If it’s not a changelog about previous commits, then your second example is clearer. Perhaps you can see that better comparing these simpler examples: The edit adds more info to the article about the ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 15.2k
2 votes

Word order: Can an adjective be a subject in an English sentence?

Nominal ellipsis. As in: McCarthy (1991:43) supposes that ellipsis is the omission of elements normally required by the grammar which is the speaker/writer assumes are obvious from the context and ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 13.9k
1 vote

"when would be..." autocorrection

I wrote: Please let me know when would be a good time to... Correction: Please let me know when a good time would be to... OK, I got it wrong above so I should post a more detailed (and better) ...
John Lawler's user avatar
1 vote

Why does left come before right?

With up and down, as well as left and right, could it not be related to how words are written down in English?
Oitekno23 's user avatar

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