3

Yes. You can almost always move an adjective phrase around by utilizing commas. You may also have to cut or add pronouns, sometimes to make the sentence grammatical, other times for style. Notice the different patterns in the two examples below (each with three variations of the same sentence). His razor-sharp wit cut her like glass. His wit was ...


3

Quotative inversion is discussed in the style guide The Right Word at the Right Time: A Guide to the English Language and How to Use It (p301). It has this example: 'No, you cannot,' said Mrs Robinson. It goes on to note: Certain modern writers...dislike this convention, and insist on retaining the usual word order. ... This blanket objection seems ...


2

It's called subject–verb inversion, and it's grammatically correct, although some forms are found more often than others. So both Says John Smith, "The credit profiles of ..." and John Smith says, "The credit profiles of ..." are idiomatic, although the second form is more likely to be found in speech. The first is a stylistic choice emphasising ...


1

There are a few situations where you can put a phrasal adjetcive directly behind a noun but they are only the cases where simple adjectives can be used in that way. The most common examples I can think of are to do with food and drink and describing the way in which the item is prepared. For instance "I'd like a steak well done with chips please." is a ...


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