6

Style guides differ considerably on the best way to express a percentage such as ten percent. To make matters even fuzzier, some of them have different advice depending on whether the term appears in running text or in a special element (such as a table) and depending on whether the subject of the text is general or heavily scientific or statistical. Here is ...


6

There is no question that it is confusing. But on consideration I would vote for answer (2) (2) The author has been guilty of a misnegation error and should have written There is no question that boringest does not belong to the grammar of standard English. As you noted in your question, standard dictionary definitions of 'there is no question about/...


3

When to drop AD and BC from dates? Well as usual the answer is can the reader understand the text if you drop them. If you were talking about the G20 meeting in 2018 I think the meaning is clear even if you do not use A.D. If you were talking about the evolution of military tactics used by Roman Centurions, then I am sure you would need to include B.C. or A....


3

First, we must define what '[the debate about whether] boringest belongs to the grammar of standard English' means here. The author explains: 'Common forms and structures will be fully grammatical, rarer items dubious.' He is using 'grammatical' in the sense considered a [well-formed] word on the basis of regular use as shown in the corpora studies mentioned,...


3

I'm a bit reluctant to post this as an answer since I don't really have anything to say on the construction "there is no question that". However, to me the context implies that Rimmer considers boringest to be ungrammatical. The reason is this earlier sentence: For example, -ing adjectives such as alarming, gratifying, mocking form comparatives and ...


3

Your conclusion #1 is correct. This sentence (as-written) is consistent with the purpose of the work. I.e. the author’s arguments support that boringest IS a legitimate usage. Context of the Sentence: The excerpt is taken from a section entitled "A tale of two methodologies" in which the author describes two methods by which word usage can be determined ...


2

The answer is 1: I have misunderstood the paragraph, and the author does indeed believe that boringest is grammatical. The statements to the contrary (2 and 3) rely on inferences from a reading of the rest of the paragraph where the author believes strictly in the rules he lays out. However, in examining the paragraph there is plenty of room for the ...


2

Without a doubt, the author intends to say that boringest does not belong to the grammar of standard English--at least not on the basis of the analysis of corpora. He goes to considerable length to explain this method of determining what is and is not standard, as summarized in other answers. Thus, he (or his editor) has made a mistake (misnegation). Or ...


1

I couldn't find a source to cite, but I'm a professional editor. As you assumed, all three are correct. The first two examples, using then, indicate things Petraeus did when he held those ranks (major general and lieutenant general). The third, using former, indicates something he said after he was a general: that is, he was a former general when he issued ...


1

Referring specifically to The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.), 6.64, it says this: 6.64: Colons with “as follows” and other introductory phrases A colon is normally used after as follows, the following, and similar expressions.       The steps are as follows: first, make grooves for the seeds; second, sprinkle the seeds; third, push the earth ...


1

In your first example, I can't see that punctuation is needed at all. "To bring my father back" isn't a clause because it lacks a finite verb and, although the first part, "My next wish is", does have a subject and a verb, it seems too truncated to qualify properly as a clause, dependent or not. If you switched the two parts around, thus: "To bring my father ...


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