8

It is not required to put a comma after a dependent clause, and some writers don't. Here are two examples from journalists writing in today's Guardian newspaper: Unless the public gets angry enough to force a rethink we had better hope that at least the computer stays risk-averse. Every time a "periodic" falls off the wagon they hit the ground ...


8

You are starting from a false premise if you believe that there is a position where the preposition "is supposed to be", particularly if you think that the correct position is "at the end of the sentence" (called preposition stranding). Indeed, there are some people who regard this as an error. In fact, the position of the pronoun in relative constructions ...


7

Note, first, that we generally speak of a perspective on a subject, not of it. There is no graceful way to deploy one noun phrase as object of two different prepositions heading complements of two different nouns, adjectives or verbs. There is a notoriously graceless way, which is the construction you suggest: I will widen my perspective on and approach ...


6

First, it's not a hyphen; it's an em dash. We use it for: Aposiopesis: where a sentence is ended suddenly because the speaker is too emotional or can't think of the right way to express something or just— A stronger break than parentheses—inserting a clause in the middle of another though—but remaining with the same sentence. Showing a change of thought, ...


5

You could always break it up into separate sentences (if it's important enough to leave parentheses): It's widely known that the name "JavaScript" is trademarked by Oracle. The name was formerly a trademark of Sun (and before that a trademark of Netscape). If you don't like that, you might try putting it into a chronological list: It's widely known ...


5

How to parse the sentence is not simple. First, it is not a simple sentence. It has two clauses, each with a main verb. The matrix verb is seem, and it is tensed. The rest of the sentence is part of the subordinate infinitive clause, whose main verb is find. But infinitives don't have tense, so it is not a tensed verb. The logical structure of the actual ...


4

You seem to be misunderstanding the makeup of the sentence. It is not made up of [subject] [was that] [independent clause] Rather, it is: [subject] [copula] [dependent clause] In other words, was that is not a constituent that belongs together. The verb ‘to be’ is a copula (also known as a ‘linking verb’) that basically functions like an equals sign: it ...


4

Second, it's not a sentence. What's the subject, what's the verb? It's a complex adjective phrase (i.e, a reduced disjoined restrictive relative clause), with a couple of descriptive similes attached, after being introduced by like, like most similes. The whole apparatus might well be what one would put after This thing here [pointing] is ...


4

I'm not a native speaker, but the way I learnt it, it should be ".. if I went with him".


4

Is it a quibble? No. It's hard to deduce a precise meaning without some context. The use of "fairy tales" implies that the writer does not believe in the teachings of the priests and considers them to be nothing better than stories for children. So the sentence can be read as "We have worked hard, but our efforts are being undermined by the false ...


4

I have not read the book which you are referring to, so perhaps some context which is relevant is missed to me. In general English, however, the phrase "It did not help that X" is usually used to express than an already negative event is further amplified by X. For example The elevator in my apartment was broken. It did not help that my limp had only ...


4

Peter seems [to have [found his glasses]]. is a catenative construction. Verbs like "seem" and "have" are catenative verbs, a class of verbs defined as those that have a non-finite clause as complement (with a few exclusions, e.g. those where the clause is complement to be in its ascriptive or specifying senses). Examples include: You seem to like her; I ...


4

There is a degree of pain which the writer assumes would not be there (i.e. the pain would be less) if the stitches were not as tight as a drum. The degree of pain is more than that ("too much [not] to"), so the writer concludes that they must indeed be as tight as a drum.


3

In this type of sentence, where you have one adjective in front of the noun and another after the noun, the latter is used predicatively, which means it is connected both to the subject (like an adjective) and to the verb (like an adverb). It is similar to sentences with subject complements, such as enough details were available. The word available is also a ...


3

'Available' is part of an adjectival clause 'that is available for all sectors'. The 'that is' is unnecessary and is omitted. 'Available' could be put in a different position e.g. 'There isn't sufficient available data, for all sectors, .....'. But it is quite normal for such a clause to be placed after the noun which it qualifies. Please note a couple of ...


3

What was formerly a trademark of Netscape? Sun? It is widely known that the name Javascript is a trademark now the property of Oracle but once owned by Sun (a trademark registered by Netscape). Oracle? It is widely known that the name Javascript is a trademark of Oracle (which is itself a trademark of Netscape, later owned by Sun). JavaScript? It is ...


3

It is correct, although this phrasing has a rather formal and old-fashioned sound. If you are looking for something that sounds more like casual spoken English, you might say: It is a subject I could talk about for hours.


3

A material holding in a company might mean one of two things:- It could be a shareholding that is sufficiently large as to allow the holder considerable influence over the company. If I owned 30% of the shares in ACME Plc, the management of that company would have to pay attention to my views on investment decisions, which they wouldn't have to do if I ...


3

Switch "are" and "either" and it should be fine, because then you have three clauses that are all describe qualities of the book.


3

I've seen this expressed as "with over 80 combined years in marketing".


3

It's okay, but perhaps not what you mean. You perhaps mean: He would go to the theater if I went with him. The would clause is conditional, but the clause used to give the condition is not itself in the conditional mood. We might use your form if we had another reason for using would, like a double conditional: If it wasn't raining, I would go to the ...


3

A complex sentence has more than one clause, and a clause requires a subject and verb. "At her age" is a prepositional phrase, which doesn't contain a verb, so your sentence remains simple. Conjunctions may be omitted. Punctuation may take their place: Minggay Awok was lonely; her only companions were a few charcoal black chickens. His business ...


3

"whose need of stories is matched only by the need adults have of children to tell stories to, of receptacles for their stock of fairy-tales, of listening ears on which to unload those most unbelievable yet haunting of fairy-tales, their own lives" 1) Does the sentence "of listening ears on which to unload those most unbelievable yet haunting of fairy-tales"...


3

I believe "the long scar smashed into the jungle" is the artificial clearing created by the plane which crashed onto the island, stranding the boys there. If he is standing in the clearing then you could say that the clearing "is all around him". "a bath of heat" is a metaphor which is saying that the air (in the clearing) is so hot that it's like being in ...


3

The long velvet train of a dress 'sweeps across' the floor, trailing behind the novelist George Eliot, and Roland imagines she is still a visitor and researcher in the Library. Perhaps writing 'Mill on the Floss.' George Eliot is compressed because she is only glimpsed between the heavy Patristics books on the shelves. 'Ring' as you guess describes the ...


3

The correct answer is #3: There is more than one seller claiming... First off, seller is still singular in this case. According to this site: When “more than one” modifies a singular noun, it goes with a singular verb: “More than one person is going.” Then you have the question of the verb to claim. When in doubt, I drop out optional bits that ...


3

No: it's built as a single independent clause headed by is, with a subject (The first thing) modified by a relative clause ([which] you have to do), and a complement consisting of an infinitival clause headed by make, with an implied subject [you], an object consisting of two conjoined content clauses that the car is on a reasonably level piece ...


3

This sen­tence: This is be­cause many stu­dents think that all of their sen­tences need to be com­plex and them not un­der­stand­ing what a com­plex sen­tence is. is apt to pro­voke gram­mat­i­cal con­fu­sion be­cause you aren’t ini­tial­ly cer­tain about what two syn­tac­tic con­stituents (call them X and Y) which the con­junc­tion and is co­or­di­...


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