26

"Non-billable" is the common term according to some brief research.


9

Merriam-Webster has cheapskate noun: a miserly or stingy person especially : one who tries to avoid paying a fair share of costs or expenses


8

As an alternative to the standard "non-billable" answer, there is a related concept of "direct" and "indirect" charges used in the contracting world. "Direct" charges are where hours worked are billed directly to the client (e.g. they get an invoice that says a developer worked on the task for 80 hours at X rate). "Indirect" charges are hours worked on ...


7

I think the word you are looking for is 'flashback'. While it does not have the exact connotation, because it implies suddenness, it most closely approaches a 'negative nostalgia'. It is usually used in the plural, as in 'flashbacks'. [A] sudden, clear memory of a past event or time, usually one that was bad. (Cambridge Dictionary) So to complete your ...


6

Pebbles or Chippings I know that weird green stuff you mention! And it’s not natural sea-worn glass. But if I wanted to describe it, I’d say ‘green glass pebbles’. When I looked it up online I also found ‘chippings’. You can even buy them on Amazon!


4

Several word finder websites allow you to find a word based on partial information; they would list HANGMAN, SANDMAN etc. as the options for the input _AN_MAN. Some of them, e.g. this one call the input a word pattern. (The sites generally offer more options than necessary for Hangman; a blank in Hangman is always only one character, similar to the ? ...


3

In my experience the word Lethal may be a good choice here.


3

Case Case means ‘example of a situation occurring’, or ‘situation’. Example: Recently, there has been a lot of discussion about stores overpricing their bacon. The recent event in which the store priced bacon at $100/lb is a perfect case of such overpricing. In the case of a fire occurring, meet at the designated area. She had thought he was honest, but ...


3

I can find two possibilities. First, in some cultures like that of African-Americans in the American South, graves were often covered with various bric-a-brac. These would have included the green glass you describe, perhaps obtained from bottle fragments. Ross W. Jamieson describes them: In North America the surface decoration of graves with ceramics ...


2

pussycat humorous: someone who is surprisingly gentle: -Cambridge online I guess you could say.. I just see a bunch of pussycats.


2

The word Detatched comes to mind.


2

Yes, a choice can meet a certain definition of misplaced. One of the main sub-definitions of the word misplaced is (of an emotion or action) directed towards a person or thing that does not deserve it Collins English Dictionary The choice of a candidate can certainly be described as not appropriate or correct, so this definition would support the ...


2

I am concluding 'no' after a thorough search and collecting the answers provided here. I did find some interesting names for unique words including ambigrams and antigrams. I wrote a program, and I found that there are only 13 such words in the English language, so @Hot Lick's guess was almost exactly right. Here are the words: AA ABA AHA AHI AI ALA ...


2

The word skinflint comes to mind: a person who would save, gain, or extort money by any means : miser Example of usage: He was so mean, would ask the barber for a free haircut. But the skinflint was actually a very wealthy man. Word origin of 'skinflint' C18: referring to a person so avaricious that he would skin (swindle) a flint In other ...


2

My company (in the IT world) categorizes these as "overhead". We use this for company quarterly meetings, annual performance review meetings, time spent on recruitment or proposal writing, etc. "You may charge 1 hour to overhead for this meeting."


2

Updated to reflect question clarification From your provided example, it seems as if you're trying to connote a moral judgement on the 2nd woman. In this case, degenerate might suit you. From Merriam-Webster: Having sunk to a condition below that which is normal to a type; especially having sunk to a lower and usually corrupt and vicious state. She ran ...


1

There is facetious (for humor) but you seem to be describing superficial. superficial - appearing to be true or real until examined more closely


1

Collective punishment is the formal expression: Penalty imposed on every member of a group without regard to his or her involvement in the group's actions and conduct. (www.businessdictionary.com)


1

Pauperized pauperize verb past tense: pauperized; past participle: pauperized make very poor; impoverish. Or, impoverished adjective very poor: made weaker or worse in quality


1

The answer is no, as far as I know, there is no such word. The nearest is the palindrome, being a word, phrase or sentence that reads the same left to right and right to left:"able was I ere I saw Elba."; or "Madam, I'm Adam." These are the best known of these. They are only interesting enough to acquire a special word as a mild curiosity, difficult to ...


1

Some suggestions that come immediately to mind; I'm sure there are others: not in contact with someone and hence unaware of their life events detached, distant, unfamiliar, absent, disconnected, remote, unavailable unaware of current major events/trends in important areas of modern life detached, buried, isolated, monastic, cloistered, secluded, ...


1

There's no exact corresponding term to 'nostalgia', one that captures a vague memory of feelings in the past, but negative instead of positive. However, there are multiple words that come close and fit well within your pattern. The most likely one is the noun regrets - worries over past action. or essentially bad memories of past actions (nostalgia ...


1

characterise verb ​ ​: to describe something by stating its main qualities Source: Cambridge English Dictionary


1

You already have it. The equation generalizes the earlier data. If you are concerned specifically with the mathematical quality of smoothness, it is a property of your generalized model. You chose a smooth, well behaved expression as a generalization. You may also be trying to get at the exactness of the fit (a yes/no proposition) or the goodness of a fit (...


1

If you think about it, we do, in fact speak of people’s or institutions’ finances as bein in good health or just healthy. This metaphor is in common use. I you are looking for a literal way of saying it, however, the most obvious (albeit somewhat ugly) word is creditworthiness. the online Cambridge English dictionary gives the following definition. The ...


1

If it's "the breaking of a seal," the word rupture is often associated with seal, and it has dual meanings: Rupture (M-W, noun) 1 : breach of peace or concord specifically : open hostility or war between nations M-W orders definitions by their first recorded use. Compare with Lexico (Powered by Oxford) which orders them by commonality: 1 An ...


1

regress When people or things regress, they return to an earlier and less advanced stage of development.


1

In order to convey the concepts of 'following too closely' and 'obsessing' and 'being blind to independent thought' I would choose the word 'idolize'. trans (broadly) to love or to admire to excess Merriam Webster to admire and respect someone very much, often too much Cambridge


1

For politicians it's called a handler. For our current standing president, the moment when he began to even listen to them at all was palpable. a person who trains or manages another person. a person who trains and acts as second to a boxer. a publicity agent. a person who advises on and directs the activities of a politician or other public ...


1

Minimally exceptional, is good because it is funny. I first heard George Carlin use it.


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