42

The word you are looking for is purulent: consisting of, containing, or discharging pus. "a purulent discharge" Oxford Dictionaries/Lexico It is not an especially common word in general, but it is the medical word for this.


11

witty (adjective) wit (noun) These words describe the ability to make quick, sharp, clever comebacks. Winston Churchill was famous for his quick and biting wit: Member of Parliament, Nancy Astor, speaking to Winston Churchill: If I were your wife I would poison your coffee.. Churchill: If you were my wife, I would drink it. Member of Parliament, ...


11

The style shown in your link was called... mutton-chop beard also mutton-chop whiskers Mutton chop beards are so named because they resemble a piece of chopped mutton, particular when shaped correctly. They’re characterized by sideburns that are chopped, or cut, along with the lower jawline and extend to the chin. This only refers to the luxuriant ...


7

The OED confirms BURNSIDE as a precursor to sideburns. ‘A style of beard such as that affected by General Burnside (1824–81), consisting of a mustache, whiskers, and a clean-shaven chin’ ( Cent. Dict. Suppl. 1909). Frequently plural. Also attributive. Cf. sideburn n. 1875 Cincinnati Enquirer 6 July 2/1 His whisker was of the Burnside type, ...


7

The actual adjective for pus is pussy, with a double s: [Merriam-Webster] : full of or resembling pus // a pussy wound Note that the pronunciation starts off the same as that of pus itself—as opposed to the pronunciation of the other senses of the word. Specific context, either through identifying the location or using it alongside another adjective,...


6

Rapier wit is slightly different from witty: there's a (sharp) rapier in mind. Rapier wit: ability to deliver witty and cutting remarks A rapier is a very thin sword with a long, sharp point.


5

"nostalgia" may be the word you want: nostalgia: a feeling that a time in the past was good, or the activity of remembering a good time in the past and wishing that things had not changed


5

The word finite comes to mind: 1 b : having a limited nature or existence // finite beings (source: Merriam-Webster) It's the opposite of infinite, the 'formal'/'scientific' version of endless.


4

lull - a temporary calm, quiet, or stillness


4

Both putrid and putrescent derive from the same root as pus. Per etymoline, pus is related to the Latin puter (rotten) and putere (to stink). Putrid made its way into English from these same roots in the 15th century in reference to typhus, aka putrid fever. Putrescent was a later addition, coming into English in the 17th century. Both words would carry ...


4

pus-like adj. OED a derivative of pus; more of a layman's term. As in: 2001 Cats June Most bacterial infections that I have seen create an effusion of pus-like fluid.


3

As in: (for a single word) Person A: "I can't bear fools." Person B: "Apparently, your mother could!" Person A: "Ouch ... you are quick." quick OED Of a person: mentally agile; prompt to think; of ready wit.


3

The term used by optometrists, opticians, and similar professionals for the 'lenses' that perform no refractive function is plano (in Latin, planus means flat). The term is, however, unlikely to be readily understood by the general public.


3

If you're OK with a word describing the purpose of her action, 'evasive' and 'equivocal' might work: Merriam Webster defines evasive as: : tending or intended to evade : equivocal // evasive answers and equivocal as: : subject to two or more interpretations and usually used to mislead or confuse // an equivocal statement Otherwise, a simple ...


3

There are a number of expressions that suggest using a person's own words, methods, or weapons against them. Giving them a taste of their own medicine This means doing to someone what they have either done to you or are known to do. Poetic justice This means that a person's end or punishment was fitting for their actions. Turning the tables Not so much ...


3

Perhaps debate suits your purpose: it's shorter and has less syllables than skepticism while meaning the same in a less negative manner (debates can be and usually are healthy). "There was still much debate, but it had to be done." or perhaps "It was the subject of much debate, but had to be done." Macmillan: debate NOUN 1 [...


3

What about simply open? I would have to slightly change your sample sentence: Much was still open, but it had to be done.


3

If you need a single word, "sort by frequency" sounds the most natural to me: the number, proportion, or percentage of items in a particular category in a set of data (source: Merriam Webster) "Sort by number of appearances/instances" works as well but is a few words longer; what @lly suggests is technically speaking not complete (but will certainly be ...


2

The best single word suited to this would be naïve. You could also use the phrase "bleeding heart" but A) you'd need to change the construction of your sentences, and B) it could come across a lot harsher than you intend.


2

I think 2 options are gullible and naive: naive having or showing unaffected simplicity of nature or absence of artificiality; unsophisticated; ingenuous. having or showing a lack of experience, judgment, or information; credulous: She's so naive she believes everything she reads. He has a very naive attitude toward politics. gullible ...


2

Since demonym derives from "demos," and refers to a village, or more in more general modern usage, a place (nation, continent, etc.) perhaps "theonym" might be an appropriate term to coin (if, in fact, this has not already been coined...). It's not exact, since "Theos" translates to "God," and so doesn't literally indicate a categorization by religion, but ...


2

The common term for this is simply non-prescription glasses. From "The Benefits of Non-Prescription Glasses" by Priya Modi at Classic Specs: Many of us can recall our memorable days of being made fun of in elementary school for wearing glasses. (Does “four-eyes” ring a bell?) Luckily for you, things have changed since then, and we are onto a new chapter ...


2

I will call this an eye-opener. Eye-opener (noun): something that surprises you and teaches you new facts about life, people, etc.


1

I think it will depend on the kind of thing that has an ending. Finite works for some things. A finite series, for example, would be a series that has an end. But a finite ring might not have an end. A ring that was changed to have an end might be a broken ring. It might also apply to things like promises or contracts. A broken contract is ended. ...


1

"reminiscence" comes close perhaps.


1

If I'm not mistaken, long side-whiskers were also known as "dundrearies" (the term seems to be early 20th century at latest).


1

Perhaps She dragged herself to her feet. Meaning 11 from dictionary reference to feel listless or apathetic; move listlessly or apathetically (often followed by around): This heat wave has everyone dragging around. If you want an adverb you could say She moved sluggishly [or heavily or dully] to her feet.


1

How about "much questioning"? (You used "willing to question" among the characteristics you seek)


1

Confirmation is still needed. Or I'm reserving judgment for now.


1

Synonyms to the rescue. The term is Believed to be. The Coelacanth was believed to be extinct until one showed up off the coast of Madagascar.


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