9

"Wordsmith" should satisfy your needs, except that prose is not excluded. (Cambridge Dictionary) wordsmith a person who has skill with using words, especially in writing:


4

If there were a profession or identity for someone who does a thing called 'stochastics' all day long, then yes you would call them a 'stochastician'. The term is a regular felicitous composition, similar to mathematician from mathematics and statistician from statistics. There are many people who do statistics as a full-time profession, and very few (if any ...


4

Although it is often used to refer to mechanical contrivances, I would sometimes use prototype in this sort of circumstance. prototype 1 : an original model on which something is patterned : ARCHETYPE 2 : an individual that exhibits the essential features of a later type Merriam Webster Otherwise: Archetype = typical example of something, or the original ...


3

Incognito. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/incognito This would apply to you as an individual. To hide an entire group would be something else.


2

Hike to walk or march a great distance, esp. through rural areas, for pleasure, exercise, military training, etc. A company commander once told me : "Hiking is the best conditioning for endurance..."" ...and hiking is what we did a lot of. Sometimes we did mountain trails, but always around 10K with a 40-60 lB pack. I think we called it ...


2

An option with a slightly technical bent would be stack. In a forge, you need the induced draft from the chimney. The smoke stack is a passive machine that induces the draft. It's the stack part that communicates this. Flue stack, chimney stack, smoke stack, etc. noun: smoke-stack a chimney or funnel for discharging smoke from a locomotive, ship, factory, ...


1

Jury rigging (sometimes jerry rigging) is defined by Wikipedia as "makeshift repairs made with only the tools and materials at hand", and by Merriam-Webster (jury-rig, verb) as "to erect, construct, or arrange in a makeshift fashion" One of the meanings of improvise (noun improvisation) is according to Merriam-Webster "to make or ...


1

You might be thinking of MacGyvering, which as the M/W link says, is a slang term for making do with what's on hand.


1

The usual word for this is 'march', first definition from MW is "to move along steadily usually with a rhythmic stride and in step with others". And note that it's standard enough from the days when soldiers basically always moved on foot that a standard expression for getting ahead of the enemy by secret movement is steal a march.


1

I can think of: Hematophagy Vampirism Alice and Bob are hematophagous.


1

Based on your idea of 'versist', which definitely isn't in use, you could use versewriter or versemaker (both could include a hyphen if desired), which also aren't in wide use but would be easily understood by an English speaker to mean someone who writes verse. In practice, I would agree with @Peter Shor in his comment, when he suggests just using poets and ...


1

I would call them vehicle and tenor, respectively— the whole thing being a metaphor. Tenor The word, phrase, or subject with which the vehicle of a metaphor is identified, as life in “Life's but a walking shadow” (Shakespeare). [American Heritage Dictionary] I doubt if this is an example of personification, though. That is when you liken a non-living ...


1

This may not work for you, but since it's a poem, you have certain liberties, especially for using and connecting words for colorful expressions rather than simple concise meaning. I was thinking you could almost make up your own word for it, or connect some existing, and then (if necessary) use the following line or two to clarify what that word meant in ...


1

In many circumstances, when the classes are organised by an institute of education such as a university, college or school, classes not held in the institution, or held for students who are not part of the institution’s registered student body, are extramural. = organized by a college or university, etc. for people who are not students there: Cambridge ...


1

As OP has presumably noticed, most words with the sense sought here only really exist as adjectives that don't naturally have associated adverbial forms (holy, hallowed, blest, venerated, sanctified, consecrated,...). It doesn't necessarily connote theism / religion, but noting usages like His reverence the Reverend Green in Cluedo, the best I can come up ...


1

On onomatopoeic possibilities... A search for "thwack-thwack" got me 385000 webpage links from Google today, with a search for "thwack-thwack" AND "helicopter" getting 335000 from the same company. So while it isn't exclusive to helicopters, we can at least say that the indications are that around 85%-90% of the hundreds of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible