8 votes

Meaning and origin of the word "muist"

According to John Jameson, An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language (1808), there is (or was) a word spelled muist in Scottish: MUIST, MUST, s. Musk, Border. [Cited examples:] Thy smell ...
user avatar
  • 151k
7 votes

How old is the expression "walking distance"?

The earliest usage of the phrase walking distance is from 1781 according to OED: The soil is so sandy and poor, that..there is scarce a shrub or a tree to be seen within any walking distance from the ...
user avatar
  • 51.1k
5 votes

Meaning and origin of the word "muist"

The Scottish trail for “muist” appears to be the more interesting one: from “Dictionaries of the Scots Language”: †MUIST, n., v. Also must; moust, moost. I - n. 1. Musk (s.Sc. 1808 Jam.), in comb. ...
user avatar
  • 59.4k
2 votes

Meaning and origin of the word "muist"

The OED has no entry for "muist" but has mu, noun3 and interjection. Etymology: < Japanese mu nothingness (13th cent.; 1603 in Vocabulario da Lingoa de Iapam), use as noun of mu nothing (...
user avatar
  • 28.1k
2 votes
Accepted

Use of “fat” and “fatty”

The suffix "-y", applied to a noun, means "like" or "full of". So "grassy" means either "grass-like" or "covered with grass". The word "...
user avatar
  • 21.4k
2 votes
Accepted

When was the word co-ord first used?

The word is an abbreviation of co-ordinates, which itself likely comes from coordinated outfit. The Oxford English Dictionary traces a specific usage for women's clothes to the late 1950s ("co-...
user avatar
2 votes

Origin of the phrase "free, white, and twenty-one"?

The expression "free, white, and twenty-one" goes back at least a bit farther then 1854, when the first through third editions of Alone (Richmond, Virginia: 1854), by Marion Harland (pen ...
user avatar
  • 151k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible