Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
3

Early 'efforted' Wiktionary's dating of the Thomas Fuller example (mentioned in user240918's answer) refers to a later edition of Fuller's book. An edition of Anglorum Speculum did indeed appear in 1684—but an earlier edition of the text, titled The History of the Worthies of England Who for Parts and Learning Have Been Eminent in the Several Counties and ...


2

There are such things as pronunciation guides, which are basically sets of made-up words used to stand for the letters of an alphabet to show how they should be sounded, but these show all letters, not just 'H'. To my knowledge, there is no special word for 'H' that would make it unique from all other letters, and I think you are mistaken. The only reason ...


2

First, there is no necessary relationship between wearing a cuff and cuffing someone. The Oxford English Dictionary says this about "cuff, n.1" (the clothing part): Middle English coffe, cuffe, of uncertain origin. The word has some similarity of form to Middle Latin cuphia , cuffia , in Old English cuffie , cap, head-covering, French coiffe , coif n....


1

It’s a classism. You are drawing attention to their social class. In the past, your class was something you were born with and it was very difficult to change. Social mobility is still limited, particularly to the lower classes and the poorest in societies where education has a cost attached. By using the word "plebeians" instead of, say, "people", you’re ...


1

My mother used “ligger” to describe somebody telling a lie. She was born in Manchester in 1908 and lived all her life in that city. Ligger was fairly commonly used by people of that generation in the Manchester area. My friends and I when we were children in the 1940/50’s, tended to use “fibber” to describe a liar. Probably both words are rooted in dialect.


1

As with many slang terms this originated in the WW I trenches as a way for Aussie and Kiwis to communicate in a language the French and English couldn't understand. The original saying is "wouldn't be dead for quids" meaning 'I'm having a good day' or 'I'm doing well'. So much slang can be traced back to warfare, there are many books written on the subject.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible