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History of nice: Nice is a highly polysemous word. A polysemous word has more than one meaning. Origin: Ne- (not) + scire (know, same root as 'science') -> nescire (not know) -> nescius (ignorant) -> nice (careless, clumsy, stupid - late 13c). In 14th century, its meaning was foolish, ignorant and stupid ---> semantic change (amelioration) ---> fastidious (...


5

Dog-sit (dog sitter, dog sitting), as well as house sitting are derived from the 20th Century word babysitting. BABY-SITTER - noun "someone who looks after a child while its parents are out, especially in the evening. Originally US. The derived verb 'baby-sit' is first recorded in 1947. By the 1960s 'sit' was being used on its own with the same meaning, ...


3

I am not sure that the reference to a door (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Going_Dutch) is any more than a myth. It does not seem to accord with reality for two reasons A Dutch treat is not simply between two people: OED Dutch treat n. (originally U.S.), one at which each person contributes his or her own share. 1937 Sunday Express 14 Feb. 25/3 ...


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I cannot improve upon Decapitated Soul's excellent answer, but I also cannot resist including a snapshot of a moment in the evolution of "nice" from "to have a refined taste" to a more general term of approbation. This exchange from Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey (written in 1803, published 1818) shows the hero teasing the (less educated) heroine for her ...


1

To worry someone or something is when you don´t let them be. It´s like the beads have got a feeling of their own; thus would like to be at ease, but the man won´t give them even that chance as he was probably having a sweet sensation caresing them. We can say it´s a poetic sentence, it´s just to give the impression that the man´s hands were restless.


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Worry LEXICO (Oxford) with object (of a dog or other carnivorous animal) tear at, gnaw on, or drag around with the teeth. ‘I found my dog contentedly worrying a bone’ 2.1(of a dog) chase and attack (livestock, especially sheep) ‘a farmer shot a dog that had been worrying sheep’ 2.2worry atno object Pull at or ...


1

Annulus is also related to annual, or the yearly cycle. Related to Anno Domini - Year of Our Lord. The double 'n' seems to be correct historically although they have a common origin. Not necessarily surprising that anus may not have been named until the 16th C. The hip bone ("innominate") is the "unnamed" bone. The pudendal nerve (the one that goes numb if ...


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