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Nowadays, British English speakers may also use "shotgun wedding." The British National Corpus has a large number of samples of British English through the mid-1990s. Here are the three results that come up for shotgun wedding. . Of course somebody, Who Shall Be Nameless, would bring up the subject of Burns-And-You-Know-What, and how many of his ...


20

Historically, the term knobstick wedding was used in British English, though the term is now obsolete. From Wikipedia: A knobstick wedding is the forced marriage of a pregnant single woman with the man known or believed to be the father. It derives its name from the staves of office carried by the church wardens whose presence was intended to ensure ...


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N.B. Below is an image of the American dish, biscuits with gravy. Note that a biscuit in the US is similar to a scone, a type of cake. Photo: Lizzie Munro/Tasting Table This is what British speakers usually think of when using the term biscuit, a type of plain “cookie” Image source: The Guardian The following definitions of the idiom, take the biscuit, ...


5

It is very rare in Britain for children to have exactly the same name as one of their parents. Occasionally when there are multiple siblings in a single institution (i.e. a school), they might be designated 'major', 'minor', etc. to avoid confusion. However, it is an old-fashioned convention, with only public schools carrying on the tradition. Outside of ...


5

The nearest equivalent for the UK is probably Blighty. This is defined by Lexico as An informal term for Britain or England, used by soldiers of the First and Second World Wars. The origin is thought to be the Urdu word bilāyatī meaning 'foreign' or 'european' "Blighty" is used much less frequently than it used to be, it was most common in the first ...


4

"Treated" means processed in this context, here's a relevant quote from wikipedia: To make the parchment more aesthetically pleasing or more suitable for the scribes, special treatments were used. According to Reed there were a variety of these treatments. Rubbing pumice powder into the flesh side of parchment while it was still wet on the frame was ...


4

So, you grabbed both your initial definitions from Wikipedia. But if you simply click on the "take the cake" hyperlink there, the Wikipedia entry for that phrase reveals the "bad" or "egregious" definition of the phrase ALSO EXISTS IN THE U.S. In fact, as a Canadian, where we have some British holdovers, but mostly operate with an American lexicon, I am more ...


2

From The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL. D. by James Boswell we learn the depths of Dr Johnson's contempt of Dr. Robertson: It is to be regretted that Mr. Boswell should have persisted in repeating these assertions.Dr, Johnson, on every occasion, seems to have expressed a great contempt for Dr. Robertson's works - very unjustly indeed; but however Mr. ...


2

J. C. Wells in his Longman Pronunciation Dictionary (3rd edition, 2008) has /ˈɪʃu:/ as the only American pronunciation of the word, and /ˈɪsju:/, /ˈɪʃju:/ and /ˈɪʃu:/ for British English, with the following distribution: /ˈɪsju:/: 30% /ˈɪʃju:/: 21% /ˈɪʃu:/: 49% Further information is provided about prevalence according to age, with 40% of older speakers ...


2

Note: Other answers have addressed various aspects of the posted question quite well. This answer focuses on a request made in a comment beneath the currently accepted answer: "Can you trace the beginning of the negative connotation of the phrase though?" The answer to that question, it seems to me, is relevant to the poster's more general questions about ...


2

It is an idiomatic usage of “given” as a (preposition): If you say given something, you mean taking that thing into account. Given the uncertainty over Leigh's future I was left with little other choice. (Collins Dictionary)


2

Pity, Craig Philips answer has been deleted. It was he who mentioned that the British English expression was featured in the popular BBC quiz show, QI. The QI episode, which mentions knobstick weddings is to be found in Series K, episode 4, Knits & Knots, broadcast in 2013, and hosted by Stephen Fry. Stephen Fry: If you want to tie the knot at a ...


2

In part of your reply, you describe a couple of titles that would be inappropriate for teachers to use: doctor or professor. While that is true, there are other titles that may be appropriate at the high school level: teacher or teach. Teacher is sometimes used as a proper noun in American English, so I decided to try to find it in British English. The ...


2

It's not widely known, but it is recognised by the UK Government: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mx_(title) (pronounced Məks) eg Mx Smith. It could presumably be used in the form "Please Mx, can I have some more?"


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From the list given by Wikipedia, I would say that the "U" terms bicycle/bike, vegetables and jam are now standard, as are the "Non-U" terms jack, ice cream and mirror. When I was a child in the '50s, we said wireless, but I thought everybody did in those days (even though the BBC's listings magazine has always been Radio Times). We weren't at all posh, ...


1

There are some common combinations of tense constructions in consecutive clauses. But there is no rule that prohibits the past perfect in a clause following a clause containing a present perfect. Indeed, just about any consecutive clauses can contain any verb construction. In your case, the most likely context suggests the present perfect in both clauses: ...


1

Yeah nah is a kiwi (New Zealand) slang. We have said it for decades. It is not Australian. Kiwis say yeah... acknowledging what the other person is saying but nah, don't agree or not gonna do that or just meaning no thanks. It's very very common here in NZ. There are even T shirts at our airports with yeah nah written on the front. It's as common as ...


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[1] Ed hurt himself. [2] Ed himself designed the house. Reflexive pronouns have two main uses: a complement use where they are obligatory, as in [1], and an emphatic use where they are optional, as in [2]. It's the latter use that is sometimes called 'intensifying'.


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