73

Of boughten the OED writes: boughten, ppl. a. [irreg. f. bought ppl. a. by assimilation to foughten] = bought ppl. a. used poet. for the sake of metre, otherwise only dial. and in U.S. in application to purchased as opposed to home-made articles. Under the OED’s entry for buy, in the section on that verb’s inflections and their historical spellings, at ...


56

As a native speaker of a 'deep south' dialect, I believe I can provide a fairly authoritative answer. Eat is inherently telic—unmodified it implicates (although it does not entail) complete consumption of its object. Consequently, a futurive construction such as I will eat or I'm going to eat is implicitly perfective. On is added in my dialect to ...


52

The English language has incredibly many different regional accents, leading to the same words being pronounced differently by different people, sometimes in different places and other times in the same place. What’s happening here is that some people say [ˈkʰlɪntən], such as Mrs Clinton herself, but others say [ˈkʰlɪ̃ʔn̩] with a glottal stop where the /t/ ...


42

As a native speaker of British English, I've never heard that phrase in my life and have no idea what it might mean. It's not a phrase I'd expect British people to understand, unless it's been used in one of the many American TV series that have been popular in the UK.


30

This is a pretty well-known area of variance among different North American accents of English. It's certainly not unique to you. In this post, I'll use the spelling "ohr" /or/ to represent the sound in in sore, and "ahr" /ɑr/ to represent the sound in star. However, there are added complications in that some people may distinguish three vowels among glory, ...


29

When you switch to the World English version of Oxford Dictionaries Online, their definition of usable has this little "spelling help:" Usable can also be spelled useable, with an e in the middle: both are correct. The US version simply lists useable as an acceptable variant of usable, and omits the side note. Etymonline shows usable as being derived ...


29

From my own experience, this is an idiom one can only use reliably in a diverse and cosmopolitan American milieu. I employ it with no hesitation if there are Jews present, because I am certain they will understand it. But educated people with a lot of multicultural awareness probably will as well. It is not something one would be likely to use in, say, a ...


29

spicket Definition of spicket chiefly South & Midland [Middle USA] : spigot (Merriam Webster) Do you use "spigot" or "spicket" to refer to a faucet or tap that water comes out of? a. spicket (6.38%) b. spigot (66.89%) c. I use both interchangeably (2.52%) d. I say "spicket" but spell it "spigot" (12.64%) (Vaux, Bert and ...


28

Heighth is no error It is a misunderstanding that the spelling or pronunciation of heighth is an illiterate and uneducated error. Although many wrongly consider it such, history is not on their side, nor are the better dictionaries. Despite how in particular over the last century the heighth spelling has come to be stigmatized, heighth is a perfectly ...


28

The origin is somewhat surprising. It dates back to Old English, according to the OED's entry for it: As the subject of an existential clause: = there adv. 4d. Now chiefly U.S. regional (south. and south Midland). In Old English esp. with following that-clause; compare A. 4a(b). The earliest example they give is this one, from "early Old English" (...


28

'Mizzle' is not, exactly, the same as 'drizzle'. As the word implies, it is mist that is lightly precipitating into droplets, but the droplets are small enough to remain airborne and do not fall as drizzle. The progression is seen in a reference quote in the OED : 1806 J. Beresford Miseries Human Life I. vi. 111 A mist, which successively becomes a ...


27

what other kind of student is there? College students. Private students. Home-schooled students. Student drivers. As Keshlam noted in a comment: It says "school students" because if it just said 'students" many of us would indeed translate it as "student drivers." Which is a somewhat different kind of hazard. A car full of school students isn't likely to ...


27

Nearly fifty years old, born in the UK, living in N. Italy for too many years, but a frequent visitor to the UK and Ireland: can't say I have never seen ‘mensch’ online, or that my mind exploded when I read the OP's sentence. By the way, should it be written with a capital letter? In its proper context, the meaning of ‘mensch’ was easy enough to guess. But ...


26

I'm an American from the south, and in contrast to other Americans who have answered, I've never heard that idiom before. I didn't have any clue what the word mensch was supposed to mean until after reading comments/answers here, and I still have to look it up to be actually sure what it means. I find it surprising that this is referred to as an Americanism, ...


26

As a native British-English speaker, who has lived in New Zealand for over 10 years, I have never heard this word before in either country. I would say this is exclusively American-English, and probably only from certain big cities, as well. Its use is somewhat akin to my saying "I'm going to see the whanau" and expecting anyone outside New Zealand to ...


26

Short answer Yes, there are varieties of English that use linking and intrusive l in a similar way to how other non-rhotic varieties use linking and intrusive r. spa /spa:/ is /ɪz/ the spa is /ðə spɑ:r ɪz/ "the spar is" (intrusive r) the spa is /ðə spɑ:l ɪz/ "the spal is" (intrusive l) The examples above show some similarity between linking r and linking ...


25

Hwoa! Hwat’s with the hwistling hwisky? > In which English accents do they put an h before every word that starts with wh? That isn’t what’s going on — you only think you hear an h, because your phoneme set doesn’t include this sound, but its use is pretty common in various accents. Which accents? Lots. Scottish. Irish. Several counties in the north of ...


24

I didn't become familiar with the term mensch until the 1970s, when I moved from Texas to the east coast (Maryland) for college. At the time I assumed that it was simply a regional term. However, the frequency of "a mensch" in Google Books search results suggests that the term's popularity in published writings has grown substantially since the ...


22

It's Law French, the normal language of law in England until well after 1464. The words Rawe, Skawe, cokell [and] fagge are evidently English words, not French ones, presumably either because there weren't corresponding French terms (at least in Law French), or because it was important to cover every case in this statute. So, while the rest of the text is ...


21

It appears to be a dialectal variant from East Midlands where: Reflexive pronouns are characterized by the replacement of "self" with sen (from Middle English seluen): Y'usen – Yourself, Mesen – Myself, Thisens – Themselves/Yourselves, Ussens – Ourselves Example: We sh'll ay to do it ussens. (We shall have to do it ourselves.) ...


20

This pronunciation isn't peculiar to that region—it's virtually universal in US speech. As Kate Bunting and user070221 say, the vowel in unstressed you will usually be reduced to /ə/; and in rapid speech the dental stops /d/ and /t/ followed by palatal /j/ (orthographic ‹y›) will usually "assimilate" to an affricate: /dʒ/ (=‹j›) and /tʃ/ (=‹ch›). ...


20

The meaning of seh In Jamaican Patois at least, seh is a cognate of say. For example, from JamaicanPatwah.com¹: seh English Translation say Definition Saying Example Sentences Patois: Wah yuh seh? English: What are you saying? and from The Poetry Archive: Nouns In Creole, where a noun refers to a class of ...


19

The corpora I checked indicate that both forms are used on both sides of the Atlantic. The BYU-BNC British National Corpus has 32 instances of chaperon and 32 of chaperone from the 1980s to 1993. The Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) has 277 instances of chaperone and 60 instances of chaperon from 1990 to 2015. (I excluded the spoken sections.) ...


17

Such use of done may be called the completive ‘done’ or the perfective ‘done’, an example of a completive/perfective aspect[ual] particle: it is a particle, i.e. a word which serves as a marker of grammatical relationships between other words rather than expressing lexical meaning in and of itself it indicates the completive or perfective aspect, i.e., that ...


17

The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men gang aft agley is a well-known line from the Scots poet Robbie Burns. It appears in "To a Mouse, on Turning Her Up in Her Nest With the Plough, November, 1785". The Wikipedia provides a translation from Scots to English, which is a tad snarky in my view, but possibly helpful for those raised outside the British Isles....


16

Although double modals are not “standard” written English outside of “dialect” writing, they are common enough, particularly in the north of Britain and in some parts of North America. Perhaps the best reference is the chapter on “The English double modals” in Linguistic Change Under Contact Conditions (ed. Jacek Fisiak; Mouton De Gruyter, August 1995), ...


16

In India, curd is marketed as "yoghurt." see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curd Curd and Yoghurt are indeed used interchangeably in many parts of (mostly urban) India and the region in general, though probably not in the UK, the US and some other parts of the world. (Thanks to @Peter Shor for the guidelines).


16

This answer seems to do a good job of explaining the difference. Yogurt and curd are similar in that bacteria are used to produce lactic acid to thicken the milk. They're different in that yogurt is made with pure culture for consistency.


16

Garrison Keillor doesn't know, and online sources are all rather contradictory (the game is variously said to have originated in Germany, Ireland, Sweden, and the U.S.) and dubious. So the best answer may well be that origin of the Minnesota name is lost to history, and any answers will be speculative. I noticed, however, that of all the variants played in ...


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