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71 votes
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Is “I’ve boughten many vinyls” correct in its use of “boughten”?

Of boughten the OED writes: boughten, ppl. a. [irreg. f. bought ppl. a. by assimilation to foughten] = bought ppl. a. used poet. for the sake of metre, otherwise only dial. and in U.S. in ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 135k
57 votes
Accepted

Regional dialect or just improper grammar? Eating on leftovers or just eating leftovers

As a native speaker of a 'deep south' dialect, I believe I can provide a fairly authoritative answer. Eat is inherently telic—unmodified it implicates (although it does not entail) complete ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
52 votes

What is the proper way to say “Clinton”?

The English language has incredibly many different regional accents, leading to the same words being pronounced differently by different people, sometimes in different places and other times in the ...
tchrist's user avatar
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42 votes
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Which American dialect pronounces "heard" as "hu-yd"?

Short answer: Brooklyn English and New Orleans English. Longer answer: at present, virtually no still-spoken varieties of American English feature this merger, but in the past, it was common in some ...
Juhasz's user avatar
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38 votes

Origin of the phrase "crazy as a coon"—is it racist?

'Coon' similes in mid-nineteenth-century U.S. English Raccoons are notoriously clever and dexterous animals that many farmers view (or once viewed) as varmints. In the nineteenth century, a number of ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 164k
36 votes

What would a British person call the biscuits that Americans put gravy on?

A couple of reference works that explore terminological differences between U.S. English and British English argue for scone as the approximate British English equivalent of the U.S. English biscuit. ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
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34 votes
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Why do I pronounce "horrible" so harrhibly?

This is a pretty well-known area of variance among different North American accents of English. It's certainly not unique to you. In this post, I'll use the spelling "ohr" /or/ to represent the sound ...
herisson's user avatar
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34 votes
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What would a British person call the biscuits that Americans put gravy on?

The word is ambiguous, but the object it describes in North America does not exist in British cuisine, so one cannot translate it by a single word. Some things are like that. To communicate the ...
David's user avatar
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30 votes

Spicket or spigot?

spicket Definition of spicket chiefly South & Midland [Middle USA] : spigot (Merriam Webster) Do you use "spigot" or "spicket" to refer to a faucet or tap that water comes out of? ...
lbf's user avatar
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30 votes
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What does this Peter Sellers sentence mean?

A'll a'to bahn dahn and 'arken unto 'im I'll have to to go down and listen to him. corrected after comment from Kiloran_speaking from my original interpretation, from 'I'd like to' to 'I'll have to' '...
Tetsujin's user avatar
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29 votes
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"It is" used as "there is": what is the origin?

The origin is somewhat surprising. It dates back to Old English, according to the OED's entry for it: As the subject of an existential clause: = there adv. 4d. Now chiefly U.S. regional (south. and ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.4k
28 votes

Mizzle and drizzle

'Mizzle' is not, exactly, the same as 'drizzle'. As the word implies, it is mist that is lightly precipitating into droplets, but the droplets are small enough to remain airborne and do not fall as ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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28 votes
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Is there such a thing as Intrusive-L (as opposed to Intrusive-R)?

Short answer Yes, there are varieties of English that use linking and intrusive l in a similar way to how other non-rhotic varieties use linking and intrusive r. spa /spa:/ is /ɪz/ the spa is /ðə ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
27 votes

What would a British person call the biscuits that Americans put gravy on?

Strictly speaking, the answer is that there is no word in British English for this. Other answers that say "scone", "roll", "dumpling", etc., are describing what the ...
Elhem Enohpi's user avatar
25 votes

-sen for -self in English: history and usage

It appears to be a dialectal variant from East Midlands where: Reflexive pronouns are characterized by the replacement of "self" with sen (from Middle English seluen): Y'usen – Yourself, ...
user 66974's user avatar
  • 67.4k
22 votes

Does hillbilly slang fall under a type of English language and if not, what is it called?

The answer to the question "is it a type of English" is definitely "yes". While the lines between "language" and "dialect" and "local slang" can blur, ...
Avner Shahar-Kashtan's user avatar
21 votes
Accepted

What language is this OED entry in?

It's Law French, the normal language of law in England until well after 1464. The words Rawe, Skawe, cokell [and] fagge are evidently English words, not French ones, presumably either because there ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
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20 votes

Etymology of using "ya" instead of "you"

This pronunciation isn't peculiar to that region—it's virtually universal in US speech. As Kate Bunting and user070221 say, the vowel in unstressed you will usually be reduced to /ə/; and in ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
20 votes

What is the meaning and use of "seh" in Caribbean dialects of English?

The meaning of seh In Jamaican Patois at least, seh is a cognate of say. For example, from JamaicanPatwah.com¹: seh English Translation say Definition Saying Example ...
Dan Bron's user avatar
  • 28.4k
20 votes

Use of "Say ..." to begin sentences, particularly in BrE versus AmE?

Looking up "say exclamation/interjection" on Google, we see that it is definitely American: say exclamation (North American English, informal) ​used for showing surprise or pleasure Say, ...
Justin's user avatar
  • 10.2k
19 votes
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Is "chaperon" versus "chaperone" a US versus British English thing?

The corpora I checked indicate that both forms are used on both sides of the Atlantic. The BYU-BNC British National Corpus has 32 instances of chaperon and 32 of chaperone from the 1980s to 1993. The ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 81.9k
19 votes

What would a British person call the biscuits that Americans put gravy on?

I did wonder what Americans called a 'biscuit' and put gravy on because we don't really have an equivalent item. If they are like a sort of savoury scone then the nearest thing is cobbler which is ...
BoldBen's user avatar
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17 votes
Accepted

Is there a name for the Southern verb form "done" + past tense?

Such use of done may be called the completive ‘done’ or the perfective ‘done’, an example of a completive/perfective aspect[ual] particle: it is a particle, i.e. a word which serves as a marker of ...
choster's user avatar
  • 43.4k
16 votes

Is “I’ve boughten many vinyls” correct in its use of “boughten”?

It depends what you mean by “correct”. Different varieties of English — e.g. standard US English, or standard British English, or various regional dialects — work differently. He snuck round the ...
PLL's user avatar
  • 20.6k
15 votes

Is there such a thing as Intrusive-L (as opposed to Intrusive-R)?

I was not aware of /l/ being ever used in the way /r/ is in RP to link two words ending and beginning with a vocalic sound respectively until I read Araucaria's answer. In any event, it might be ...
grandtout's user avatar
  • 1,728
14 votes

What is the proper way to say “Clinton”?

With names of persons it's generally a good idea to use the same pronunciation as the name bearers themselves. They are the only possible authority regarding the pronunciation of their own name. ...
Helmar's user avatar
  • 5,437
14 votes
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Is there a difference in meaning between "fill {something} in" and “fill {something} out” in American English?

The distinction between fill out and fill in is rather ambiguous. Generally speaking, in the US, "fill out" means to "complete" the form -- supply all applicable information. "Fill in" means to put ...
Hot Licks's user avatar
  • 27.5k
14 votes

Alternatives to y'all?

According to dialect maps created in 2013 by Joshua Katz, the majority of people in the Chicago area report that they usually use "you guys" to "describe groups of two or more". In ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.4k
14 votes

Does hillbilly slang fall under a type of English language and if not, what is it called?

I've voted up the "Appalachian English" answer, but depending on what you mean, there has historically been a larger sub-dialect area in the US referred to as "South Midland" with ...
T.E.D.'s user avatar
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