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31 votes

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t?

There's no rigorous or official definition of what a "silent letter" is. The sound represented by the letters "tch" in "witch" is what linguists call an affricate. These ...
herisson's user avatar
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7 votes

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t?

Perhaps a comedy answer but honestly, I’ve always thought that “which” has a missing “t” whereas “witch” is perfectly sensible as written. Nothing silent there. In my view , it’s the ones WITHOUT the “...
Judy D's user avatar
  • 575
2 votes

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t?

Some people pronounce "witch" the same as "which", that is, making the "t" silent. Others pronounce the "t", "witch". Your examples of words where &...
Jay's user avatar
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2 votes

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t?

According to LPD (Longman Pronunciation Dictionary, 2008) the trigraph "tch" is regularly pronounced /tʃ/; this means that "tch" is not considered as t followed by "ch", ...
LPH's user avatar
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2 votes

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t?

Apart from the fact that a few Americans still aspirate the /h/ in which (long gone in BrE), the full Oxford English Dictionary gives exactly the same pronunciations for both witch and which... which ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes

Defense vs. Defence in Canadian English

Following up on Jason Bassford's answer, I note that The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (Oxford University Press, 1998) not only begins its entry for defence with this: defence n. (also defense)... [...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 165k

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