8

Don't flap it, then — use a /t/ and not a flap; /ɾ/ and /t/ are allophones in American English, so it doesn't matter which you one use (except maybe if you're trying to speak with a perfect American accent). Possibly the Americans who use a flap in the sequence /ɹɾɚ/ use a different variety of /r/ than you're using. I'm American, and I use one kind of /r/ in ...


4

Modern American English does not have phonemic vowel length. Americans, in fact, pay very little attention to vowel length, so it is quite difficult for them to learn to differentiate between long and short vowels in other languages. In American English, in the dialects that still preserve the difference between fairy and ferry, the difference is in the ...


3

As pointed out in comments, Modern English does not have vowel length. The so-called "long vowels" are modern descendants of the Middle English long vowels, which were changed by the Great Vowel Shift into tense vowels, no longer than any other. Unfortunately, this happened after the rules of English spelling got more or less fixed. So the original ...


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