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What are the nuances of the British expression "gone" used with time, as in "gone 8" or "gone midnight"?

Gone = past, but "gone" is preferable where it avoids repetition of "past" within the time. Gone tends to be more informal. English, and I suspect other languages, is filled with ...
Greybeard's user avatar
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11 votes
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Is "farfel" an idiolectical quirk/part of a familect?

Arthur Schwartz, Arthur Schwartz's Jewish Home Cooking: Yiddish Recipes Revisited (2008) offers this account of farfel: Farfel The word farfel is fun to say, and it has symbolism. It is related to ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
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-2 votes

Why is home electricity supply called "mains"?

All of our systems engineers and electrical engineers use that term at my company. I am a mechanical engineer who was tasked to design-in "AC mains" into an electronics box which will ...
MEstallion's user avatar
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Why do we call predator birds "birds of prey"?

The phrases fowl of prey, bird of prey, beast of prey date from the 14th c. The word prey is from the Old French proie, preie, praie.. The preposition of in the phrase "of prey", means &...
TimR's user avatar
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Why do we call predator birds "birds of prey"?

of = contextually associated with An eagle is a bird that is contextually associated with prey.
Greybeard's user avatar
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Why do we call predator birds "birds of prey"?

Birds of prey simply refers to predatory birds. It's a confusing phrase that doesn't seem right when compared to other similar phrases but prey is related to the bird in the sense of what is hunts. It ...
Twelve Voltage's user avatar
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Etymology of "banged-up" = "imprisoned"?

What is the etymology of banged-up = "imprisoned"? (I'm guessing it came from the banging sound of the gate/door as one is locked up?) That is the general consensus. Pre-internet slang is ...
Greybeard's user avatar
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What's the origin of the idiom "miss the boat"?

There will be no use of the phrase before 1832 as this is when the word “bus” first entered English and all variants, of which "boat" is a later one, refer to some sort of public transport ...
Greybeard's user avatar
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What is the origin of “give it the beans!”?

The bottom pads of a cat's paws are often referred to as 'beans'. 'Give it the beans' might be similar to 'step on it'.
Chez Snailez's user avatar
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What is the origin of the phrase "grease the skids"?

The idiom emerged in British Columbia coastal oxen logging operations, late 19th century. Skids were logs placed perpendicular across the trail with enough gaps for oxen to find footing. The logging ...
James Glave's user avatar
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What is the origin of "Pipped at the post"?

"Pipped": Could it be shorthand for getting "Wally Pipped". Wally Pipp was the first baseman who supposedly wanted a day off for a headache on June 2, 1925. He was replaced by ...
Steve H's user avatar

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