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1

Stereo in stereophonic refers to the three-dimensional sense: Stereophonic sound or, more commonly, stereo, is a method of sound reproduction that creates an illusion of multi-directional audible perspective. (Wikipedia) Stereo (etymology) before vowels stere-, word-forming element meaning "solid, firm; three-dimensional; stereophonic," from Greek ...


1

Early etymology of boy: Wikipedia has: Etymology: The word "boy" comes from Middle English boi, boye ("boy, servant"), related to other Germanic words for boy, namely East Frisian boi ("boy, young man") and West Frisian boai ("boy"). Although the exact etymology is obscure, the English and Frisian forms probably derive from an earlier ...


4

John Walker (1732 - 1807) has the following remark in his Critical Pronouncing Dictionary (London, 1791): There is a remarkable exception to the common sound of this letter [e] in the words clerk, serjeant, and a few others, where we find the e pronounced like the a in dark and margin. But this exception was, I imagine, till within these few years, ...


0

The Sherlock Holmes story in question is Silver Blaze, one of the stories in the collection The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Here's some of the context for the use of the word "consultant": Holmes shrugged his shoulders. "There are certainly grave difficulties in the way," said he. "[...] Might I ask for a photograph of Mr. John Straker?" The ...


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I think Etymonline description is quite clear. The fact that originally the term was applied to “person who consults an oracle“ may create confusion. Those who “consulted an oracle” were privileged people who had access to oracles whose opinions were often requested by ordinary people who wanted to know the views and suggestions of oracles. In that sense ...


2

It's a reference to a meme popular amongst Reddit users and other online forum users. From Knowyourmeme.com How Is Babby Formed refers to a popular question posed to the Yahoo! Answers forum about how humans reproduce. The question is known for its awkward phrasing and misspelling of the word "baby." The phrase became a popular source of YouTube remixes, ...


0

Strike me down swiftly but is it possible that the phrase came from a mishearing of 'struck accord'? A quick googley eyed look reckons the French 'acorde' meaning 'agreement' crossed over into English around 12c. People might have been first 'striking chords' in the diplomatical sense around then?


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No, it's just "what are you talking about". There could be a hint of droning, but there needn't be. In itself, it's a very neutral interrogative question when you want to know what's going on\what the other person means.


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Yes it is reasonable to apply 'rare' to one of a kind. For two reasons. First is that it is reasonable to consider that "unique" is just an extreme form of 'rare'. But being an extreme form of rare does not stop it being rare. If there were only three of something it would be rare, or if there were two - therefore it does not make sense to everybody that ...


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TLDR: the distinction actually exists in modern-day French, and this may be the source of the restriction of venom and venomous to injected toxic substances. Walker's pronouncing dictionary from 1828 has the definitions poison: that which destroys or injures life; venom. venom: poison. The 1892 Webster's High School Dictionary has the definitions ...


1

As explained by science.org the main difference between venom and poison is the way they are delivered to the victim. The terms are often used interchangeably, but ‘venom’ and ‘poison’ are not the same thing. True, they’re both a toxic substance that can potentially harm or kill you, but the main difference lies in the way they are delivered to the ...


0

You are ALL wrong...Nimrod was the world's first "Anti-Christ" figure. He appeared not long after the flood when the sons of Noah's sons had "multiplied upon the earth"-Genisis. God instructed the post flood humans to "spread out upon the face of the Earth" But Nimrod, who had conquered most peoples in existence at the time, did NOT want to divide his ...


4

Is rare an appropriate descriptor for something that is one-of-a-kind? No. Something that is one-of-a-kind is unique. Something that is uncommon but not unique is rare. The Mona Lisa is unique. Gold is rare on our planet. A custom-made guitar is unique, built to particular specifications and reflecting the capabilities of its maker. Guitars that have ...


-1

I think that the analogy being made is that when we choose bad over good, it gives Satan more power over us. If he gains enough power, we become like the chaff. We will have no self control but he will have total control over us and our destiny. That is comparable to the way that the chaff is totally controlled by the wind. It is erratic and has no ...


-1

I think it has a different meaning all together while used as a response when 2 people disagree to something and one says 'please chill'... I think this is a sort of 'I don't care'. Because if we take the meaning as 'calm down' it is a polite way to give a call to 'stay quiet' or 'skip'


17

As you surmise, dreadnought originates as a compound of dread and nought, and nought is a noun, so the original meaning was something like shies from nothing. But if you will forgive the use of that most tiresome favorite adverb of pretentious Internet commenters, actually, the first English Dreadnought was a Third Rate galleon commissioned during the reign ...


3

Apart from the use as a name for Martin Guitar, I've never seen it refer to anything but the ship. But the meaning is clearly fears nothing. As Edwin Ashworth points out, nothing is the direct object of fears. Etymonline tells us: Dreadnought literally "one who or that which fears nothing," from the verbal phrase (drede ich nawiht is attested from c. ...


3

Auspicial appears to be a less common variant of auspicious. origin of auspicial: 1605–15; < Latin auspici(um) auspice + -al


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The origin of the phrase appears to be Old English: OED to the bone or to the bare bone Phrases (a) to the bone (also to the bare bone). (i) Right through the flesh so as to reach the bone. Frequently hyperbolical, or in figurative contexts. Old English usage:(prior to ~ 1300) OE Ælfric Let. to Sigeweard (De Veteri et Novo Test.) (Laud)...


2

GDoS has early usages from mid-20th century: Nose-bleed: also nosebleeder, nosebleed seats [also used fig.; the nosebleeds that can accompany oxygen deprivation] (US) of seating, very high up, esp. in an auditorium or sports stadium; also as n. 1948 Post-Standard (Syracuse, NY) 25 Nov. 25/2: George Solotaire, the ticket broker [...] was ...


2

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) has this entry for nosebleed as an adjective: nosebleed adj (1978) extremely or excessively high {seats in the nosebleed section} {nosebleed stock prices}." The two earlier answers to the posted question make clear the physiological connection between nosebleeds and high altitude—and the ...


0

It appears it is probably derived from the much older version of “don’t say boo to a goose” where the idiomatic sense of boo is “nothing”. not say boo (US informal) to say nothing: You didn't say boo to me about going to your mother's this weekend. (also (US) be afraid to say boo); (UK not say boo to a goose) (Cambridge Dictionary) ...


7

Like the OP, I first discovered this unusual expression on Stack Exchange. Moderators on Stack Exchange are not employees, they are volunteers who have special privileges and powers that help them moderate a community. They are identifiable by the diamond ♦ next to their username, and they have either been appointed by the company or elected by their peers....


0

Assuming that your question is about the age and origin of the word nesh (as the tag "etymology" beneath your question implies), I can tell you that the term has been in use for many years and that opinions about where it came from differ. Here are some early entries for it in dictionries and regional glossaries. From Edward Phillips, The New World of ...


0

You might call this person Deadpan. Deadpan means "without emotion," but the most often-used context is "deadpan humor" which is humor delivered in a serious manner.


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Maybe here's what you are looking for - Facetious adjective : treating serious issues with deliberately inappropriate humor; flippant. "a facetious remark" For example - Jacky was being facetious when she said, "Yes, let's all go to Iraq for my birthday party!" Jacky is trying to sound serious while saying this, but it is not supposed ...


0

According to Oxford Dictionaries the origin of the word beach is: Mid 16th century (denoting shingle on the seashore): perhaps related to Old English bæce, bece ‘brook’ (an element that survives in place names such as Wisbech and Sandbach), assuming an intermediate sense ‘pebbly river valley’ However the same dictionary gives the definition of bleak as: ...


-1

likely to derive from disputes between sheep farmers and cattle ranchers from American west - relates to having a beef with someone. Think of the 50's movie Shane partly based on those wars


0

It's a crew (rowing, 2s, 4s, 8s) reference you guys, how does no one see that?? It's one or more crewman supporting other(s). Rowing at that time was fever pitch popularity and growing like mad. Rowing was like nation and region based sports mania culminating in the Olympics in Germany (think WWII) and only decreasing with the rise in Basketball, Baseball,...


0

According to GDpS the figurative usage of rope in(to) derives from a specific peasant activity: Schele de Vere, Georgia Scenes (1872): ‘Rope in, to, in the sense of gathering in, enlisting, is a bold metaphor derived from the common practice of gathering the cut hay of a meadow by means of a long rope, drawn by a horse’.(orig. US) to swindle or ...


2

rope Entymonline to rope (someone or something) in is from 1848. To rope in or into is to cause somebody to adopt a certain position, belief, or course of action, like twisting somebody's arm. And from the OED: to rope in originally U.S. transitive. To ensnare, to lure or decoy (a criminal's victim); to take (a person) into custody. Also ...


1

The complication in trying to identify the origin of "breaking bad" is that "break bad[ly]" has a number of figurative uses (not involving the physical splitting, sundering, or shattering of something) that antedate by many decades the probable slang that the TV show title Breaking Bad alludes to. 'Breaking bad' on the track One old figurative use relates ...


0

My mother grew up in Dawley,England beginning the mid 1920’s. She would fondly refer to me as a ‘funny onion” if I was doing something goofy or strange. She use to say it came from a humorous deviation of funny ‘un.


5

Was Gusto Popular? The NGram data on gusto is borne out by both the Corpus of Historical American English and the Hansard (British parliamentary) Corpus. For instance, here is the results for gusto in Hansard, divided by decade: Note the first instance after 1850, the growth in usage around 1920, and its resurgence after 1980. Here is COHA: So the corpus ...


2

Ok I just looked it up in the OED, which is what I should have done yesterday. The first recorded usage of crib to mean "food" or "a light meal" predates James Cook, i.e. the first European contact with Australia. dialect, Australian, and New Zealand. Food, provisions; a light meal or snack; a piece of bread, cake, etc. Frequently attributive. ...


2

Lavender, an adjective used to refer to homosexuals is from late 19th century according GDoS (orig. US) a euph. for homosexual and anything referring to homosexuality; also as n., homosexuality. [1870 [UK] ‘The Ninety-Ninth Hussars’ in Songs for the Army 46: Sir Lavender Silk was a pretty young man, [...] / His men, though respectful, had ...


0

Here is a usage of "net-surfing" from 1991 by Brendan Kehoe of the Widener CS Dept: Here's a question: how do other people deal with users that they think are doing no-nos around the net? One of our users had the habit of occasionally going net-surfing and doing the hit-and-run type of attempts (trying 'guest' usually), but I didn't have any real ...


4

Probably, as suggested by GDoS, from the following sense of crib: crib n.2 (SE crib, a container for animal fodder) (Aus./N.Z.) a snack, a light meal, a piece of bread, cake etc; thus crib bag, crib break, crib room, cribtime. 1870 [UK] Old Hunks in Darkey Drama 5 53: harry: I’m witness that you promised to give Tommy something better ...


0

My thoughts and research on this: My first thought is it originated with the corporate advertising world. Then i thought, what’s old with an o in the middle. Gramophone! So I looked it up. American Heritage says it was originally a trademark for a Phonograph. Both words have an o in the middle and date to the late 1800s. The OED provided an interesting ...


0

"STEVEN" is the canon pronunciation because Old English make-shift gender phonetics are applied to the E-PH. However in common rumor, a user of the name may be required to know the two pronunciations presented by text key models in probable instances rendering it differently pronounced than that of the "V" spelling. http://babynames.net/names/stephen


0

I always thought this is a variation of Turkish "ebil" if it's really latin derivative then this is a huge coincidence. Because the meaning is exactly the same in Turkish and ebil is not coming from latin. It's a very old Turkish word.


1

It cannot be that "wake" refers to the noun we today define as "a gathering of people to pay respects to a dead person who is laid out in their presence." Why? Because it would make nonsense, then, of the word "sleep." Why would someone necessarily have to be waked here (as in the noun sense I have just offered)? If Edmund wants his father Gloucester dead, ...


2

Pity, Craig Philips answer has been deleted. It was he who mentioned that the British English expression was featured in the popular BBC quiz show, QI. The QI episode, which mentions knobstick weddings is to be found in Series K, episode 4, Knits & Knots, broadcast in 2013, and hosted by Stephen Fry. Stephen Fry: If you want to tie the knot at a ...


3

Twain's 1873 use of "hot air" in the relevant sense does not involve the longer idiomatic phrase "full of hot air." J.E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1997) has this entry for "hot air": hot air n. empty, exaggerated, or boastful talk; in phr. hot-air artist one given to such talk. Also (rare) hot wind. {Despite its ...


-1

I would guess this comes from I Dream of Jeannie where it was common for her to invoke her powers by crossing her arms and blinking while nodding her head. Most common usage was probably teleportation.


12

I don’t know if this is the earliest example but Advanced Dungeons and Dragons (Players Handbook, 1978) has the Blink spell, a 2’ teleportation spell described as: By means of this spell, the magic-user causes his or her material form to "blink" out and back to this plane once again in random period and direction during the duration of each minute the ...


0

'Charmed' appears to be the first mainstream usage of it, and it just made its way into the culture from there. According to the Charmed wiki, the term references the phrase "blink of an eye", as it's the fastest form of teleportation, and usually doesn't involve any flashy magic effects. In WoW, for example, a mage's Blink is instant, but teleporting long ...


21

Nowadays, British English speakers may also use "shotgun wedding." The British National Corpus has a large number of samples of British English through the mid-1990s. Here are the three results that come up for shotgun wedding. . Of course somebody, Who Shall Be Nameless, would bring up the subject of Burns-And-You-Know-What, and how many of his ...


2

How ‘master’ became ‘mister’ Grammarphobia In late Middle English, people began using “Mr.,” an abbreviated version of “master,” as a title “prefixed to the surname or first name of a man without a higher, honorific, or professional title,” according to the OED. When people began speaking it, “Mr.” was pronounced like “master,” ...


20

Historically, the term knobstick wedding was used in British English, though the term is now obsolete. From Wikipedia: A knobstick wedding is the forced marriage of a pregnant single woman with the man known or believed to be the father. It derives its name from the staves of office carried by the church wardens whose presence was intended to ensure ...


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