New answers tagged

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You can survive without fulfilling your necessity but can’t survive if your needs are not fulfilled.


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I read that each word originates from a different language. Suds comes from Dutch. Foam comes from Latin.


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In most cases: Affect is usually a verb, and it means to impact or change something. Effect is usually a noun, and is the result of a change. Its the thing the affect changes... So, if A affects B, B experiences the effect of A’s action. However, an exception: Effect as a verb means to bring about. It is usually used with nouns like “change” or “...


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categorial: of, dealing with, or involving a category I think this is more common in US English, it's not common in British English. categorical: without any doubt or possibility of being changed Is not really applicable to data - its more about being emphatic in your opinion or statement... Its dealing with a different thing.


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From the standpoint of general usage, as reflected in the dictionaries (and I checked the OED, Merriam-Webster, Lexico, Collins, and Wiktionary), there is no difference in meaning. However, it is always possible that in a particular field, a word might have a much more specific technical meaning. For example, as FumbleFingers said in the comments, in ...


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In actual use, the intended meaning of these two phrases overlaps to the extent that you can't always tell the two apart. However, "side effect" has a broader meaning. A "side effect" is just any effect that isn't the principal intended one. For example, pharmaceuticals have "side effects" beyond the treatment of a patient's illness. Pharmaceutical ...


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Seems the perfect word for it, as it is a combination of 'Web Designing' and 'Web Developing' while also including other things related to it. I see it used often as a way to describe doing both. If you're specifically talking about code (markup and and programming), you might as well use 'Coding a website' as building a website may also mean using a drag-...


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There is no rule for "by" and "with". The dictionary defines "by" and "with" and demonstrates how they are used. by: to show purpose or method (by walking, by explaining) by: to show proximity (The post office is by the gas station.) by: to show agent (It was picked up by Pete.) with: = accompanying or staying together (I am with him. I have two ...


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Here is an example using frequently: I have dentist appointments frequently. And here is an example using often: I go to the bathroom often.


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The expression Butler English is confined to Indian English. I searched through many of the BYU corpora including COCA, BNC, NOW, and GloWbE. The American English (COCA) and British English (BNC) corpora returned no results. Among the other corpora, I only found about 10 results, all of which were from India, such as this news article. This book from 1943 ...


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To know is when the knowing is of the person talking. To know about is external; it has happened to someone/thing else.


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I know about electrical engineering -- I've read about it a few times and know more or less what it is. I know electrical engineering -- I have a degree in the subject and know how to do engineering stuff. I know about his pain -- I've seen him limp and I've heard him complain. I know his pain -- I have similar pains myself and know what he's going ...


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Although "by" could potentially mean "next to" as used in your examples, used as you describe it is almost always acting as shorthand for "going by". The full unabbreviated sentence would be: "A file going by the same name as the original file." This is why you don't see "by" used as in your second example. "A man going by the same type of hat." makes no ...


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Without additional context, all that can be assumed from this construction is that some reading occurred. There is not enough information to infer how much was read, and the construction does not imply completion of anything beyond "the act of reading".


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English got the word park from French parc and in Middle English it was spelled as both park and parc. Then English spelling standardized to only use park. After spelling was standardized, oyster park/oyster parc, was imported from the French parc à huîtres/parc aux huîtres. So sometimes this very specific use of the word is spelled with a c. The OED ...


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When the speaker wants to softening or downvoting the effect of adjective or an adverb, double negation is used. Though double negation makes the sentence affirmative, the double negation talks about the caughtiousness of the speaker.Double negation is commonly used in a formal way of writing. He is healthy ( less formal) ...


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It's an example of litotes, an understatement, although the precise interpretation may depend on content. See the definition of litotes. a figure of speech and form of verbal irony in which understatement is used to emphasize a point by stating a negative to further affirm a positive, often incorporating double negatives for effect [Wikipedia]


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