New answers tagged

-1

The "proper" phrasing, is more lax than most. Just as you don't have to say "I" at the beginning of sentences that imply the word. The plural 'pants' is already the plural of pant. Pairs is the word which becomes plural when referring to multiple pairs of pants. Merely we lazy so grammar has to make an exception for English being a living ...


2

My dictionary (Chambers, 13edn) provides the definition (n sing) the science and technology of the conduction of electricity in a vacuum, a gas or a semi-conductor but it also provides (n pl) the electronic parts of a machine or system and it's that second definition which you are using in your example sentence so are is correct.


0

Only a plural is possible, this being so because if you are going to make a comparison you have to begin with at least two elements. Economists want to compare the effects of the two policies.


1

I think "many" and "much" have a similar relationship in terms of countable and uncountable and they have a relatively strong connection to the idea of more of something or a lot of something.


1

Whenever you use "all", the associated noun is treated as a plural, even if there's only have one. You can't say "all my sister", even if you only have one sister; you have to say "all my sisters". Of course, you wouldn't normally use "all" in the first place in this case. If you're using a conjunction after "all&...


-1

As a question of actual practice, it depends how it is pronounced. If it adds a pronounced s or z, then write it as ~s's You have a boss, and he has a car. It is: Your boss's car If the the possessive doesn't add a pronounced s or z, then write it as ~s' You have several bosses, and they share a company car. It is: Your bosses' car These are pronounced ...


3

Can I add two points to what has been said above? While there is only one Sicily today, there was a Kingdom of the Two Sicilies (actually Sicily + Naples) from 1816-1860. So Sicily has a perfectly good plural. Moreover, we currently have two Koreas, as well as an ongoing dispute about whether there are one or two Chinas. IMHO the point about Hail Mary's, ...


3

Because Garner is writing about English, the use of the Latin source word is irrelevant. I’m not sure whether Garner is correct, or what the basis of his statement is (the entry does not tell us), but determining the accuracy of the statement requires research into actual English usage. The Oxford English Dictionary indicates that Garner's statement has not ...


3

For most speakers, metaphorical There are two Frances (two versions of the country called France) is probably indistinguishable from There are two Franceses (two people called Frances), but in context it's unlikely there would ever be any confusion. And the links into Google Books show that both versions are in use. But there's another rather less contrived ...


13

In addition to the "two Frances" use, the use of plurals for synecdoche, representing ad-hoc groups of countries by referring to some of their members, is not uncommon. "As we look to the world reopening and travel resuming, the Italies and Frances are a little behind Israel in terms of when we anticipate travel will reopen. And that's due to ...


42

Can't we always form a plural for a place/country that isn't already a plural, like The Bahamas or the Netherlands? Suppose I want to say There are really two Xs: the one the tourists see and the one I will tell you about. Note that two plural spellings appear to be in use for some countries ending in y. I have sometimes been tempted to think that, as the ...


1

There are several issues here. (1) Which sense of 'class' is intended here? (a) a group of students who are taught together at school, college, or university: ... She gave the whole class extra homework for a week. [John is not in my maths class.] [John and Jill are in different classes.] or (b) a period of time in which students are taught something: .....


-1

Which are important to an individual is an adjective clause. The Subordinating linker WHICH- American preference for THAT conceded, refers to the antecedent, Goals and hence requires a plural verb. Of course as suggested by you the noun phrase, Achievement of life goals can as well be the subject of the adjective clause and in that case a singular verb can ...


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