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Self-Actualized If your subject is not strictly anti-social but tends to prefer solitude, they may fit the profile of one who is 'self-actualized.' From that page: Self-actualized individuals value their privacy and enjoy solitude. While they also love the company of others, taking time to themselves is essential for their personal discovery and ...


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You say "my condolences to you and your family" if someone died. You say "my heartfelt commiserations to you and your team", if someone lost a game or lost their job. The latter is USUALLY for losing something. The former should MOSTLY be for deaths.


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Choleric >> Choler Sanguine >> Sanguinity/Sanguineness Phlegmatic >> Phlegmaticness None of them is as cool as malancholia, but there you go.


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I am widowed, male, and gay. This thread is interesting, a bit painful, and confounding. Of course, collective, continuing use will prevail, but as a relatively new social development - to have legally married people whose same-sex partners have died - what becomes common will depend in part on what we claim. I submit this post to add resonance for making ...


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It is said that there is a small difference between a) I saw her go home... and b) I saw her going home..., in that the former reflects 'go' as a regular action, and in the latter 'going' was progressing exactly (ie only) at that time. This is not a universally accepted argument. Still, grammarians in general say that both are not much dissimilar. I ...


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My late ex-wife, from northwest North Carolina, used a word pronounced "sursee" to mean small gift. I never saw it written or spelled. I have occasionally tried to find the word over five decades, but was unsuccessful until today.


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I would phrase this as follows: Patients who, at 6 months, showed persistently low values of peptide A (and normal peptide B) ... You can further qualify this: ... after initially presenting with low peptide A (and low or normal peptide B) at time zero. The parenthetical statements are optional if you feel it adds clarity to your statement. But, it ...


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Cheeky Someone who pushes over boundaries, is disrespectful, usually by presuming more than is being offered. As in ‘ she’s a bit cheeky - always overstepping the mark, making assumptions’. Being ‘cheeky’ in the UK often means ‘overstepping the mark’ or ‘asking too much, or taking too much’. But dictionary definitions don’t seem to depict that. They talk ...


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Presumptive Someone who presumes things, takes things for granted, anticipates before the fact. Presumption: ‘an idea that is taken to be true, and often used as the basis for other ideas, although it is not known for certain.’ Etymology ‘presume’ - late Middle English: from Old French presumer, from Latin praesumere ‘anticipate’ (in late Latin ‘take for ...


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There is overlap between the terms when talking about devices Portable - capable of being [easily] transported or conveyed. E.g. a laptop computer is a portable device (compared to a desktop device which can be moved only with some difficulty). Mobile - capable of moving or being moved readily. Essentially a subset of portable, especially when designed to ...


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If you google “reverse orphan”, you get a huge amount of hits. Apparently, this is a common question in the English language. Interestingly, this same question was asked on ELL back in 2014, and here in 2012 (which is why I marked this question as a duplicate, but am going to posit an answer here). A number of neologisms have been suggested. For ...


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In a graph, you might call these terminal nodes, or leaves (see for instance this document on a proposed text-encoding standard for graphs https://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/GD.html).


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From the clarification of the question, the problem is to describe a group of patients typified by those satisfy columns 1, 3, and 4 in the first table below ------------------------------ Start 6 months A B A B ------------------------------ low normal low normal low low low normal --------------...


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From an English language perspective, there is nothing wrong with the word childless: [Lexico (Oxford Dictionaries)] Not having any children. ‘a childless couple’ ‘I am childless by choice’ ‘For them, a childless marriage is considered a great misfortune.’ ‘He left her a childless widow at the age of eighteen.’ However, the word orphan implies ...


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I just call it being single but that simply relates to having a significant other. I dont think there is a term for it.


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Misanthropic It means ‘generally hates people’ or judges everybody. https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/misanthropic


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a small sliver of moon rock I think the above is a noun phrase and small is an adjective qualifying sliver of moon rock..


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Finally, I believe that I find the one in this case: fellow student.


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"Given the right premises, any desired conclusion can be reached, automatic as addition. This is plain to most of mankind after a few years of experiment. Jumping to conclusions is an easy process, akin to cooking, which in fact it rivals in age. Pick your premises, follow the rules, and apple pie. "Jumping to conclusions is not without value. It is the ...


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Pretentious This adjective might be used if you are trying to bring out either the undeserved importance that the speaker places on himself or that his assumptions are incorrect. characterized by assumption of dignity or importance, especially when exaggerated or undeserved: a pretentious, self-important waiter. making an exaggerated outward show; ...


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Edit Delete - previous answer Edit Add: Know-It-All One who is obnoxiously self-assertive and arrogant: Person who acts as though he/she knows everything and overwrites (DISMISSES) the ideas, opinions, comments and/or suggestions of others. 2a. Usually, a know-it-all is so sure of their own knowledge that they tend to be condescending ...


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Physicality might fit the bill here. The physical attributes of a person, especially when overdeveloped or overemphasized. Otherwise, I'd elect to use the global term fitness. Someone who is fit is a good combination of strong and dextrous.


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I think the word ‘fitness’ might be what you’re looking for. Definition of ‘fit’ from Lexico: In good health, especially because of regular physical exercise The word ‘fitness’ brings athletes to mind and athletes make me think of training that focuses on both strength and agility (think football, soccer, gymnastics, etc.). I believe the word ‘fitness’ ...


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You need to conjugate based on all the subjects of the sentence, you can't pick one and ignore the rest. Simply replace all the nouns with a single pronoun, and that will make it clear which conjugation you should use. James and his family know - > They know He and I are going -> We are going


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In terms of objects and people, something that is in the so-called real world is corporeal: [Merriam-Webster] 1 : having, consisting of, or relating to a physical material body: such as a : not spiritual // … some few traces of a diviner nature which look out through his corporeal baseness … — Robert Browning b : not immaterial or ...


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Yes, it does [form another noun phrase]. You can tell that easily by using it in a sentence with a main verb: The road to hell is paved with good intentions. The same can be done with any noun phrase. The road of power is all in the mind.


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A general term opposed to digital is analog. analog ADJECTIVE 1.2 Not involving or relating to the use of computer technology, as a contrast to a digital counterpart. Lexico But it would be interesting to find a term opposed to virtual Thesaurus.com has this: Antonyms for virtual actual authentic real There is a considerable body of ...


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Informally, purple prose. Purple prose is characterized by the excessive use of adjectives, adverbs, and metaphors. Formally, euphuism. Euphuism is a peculiar mannered style of English prose. It consists of a preciously ornate and sophisticated style, employing a deliberate excess of literary devices such as antitheses, alliterations, repetitions and ...


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I'd also suggest Excessive going beyond a normal or acceptable limit in degree or amount and Overkill the state or an instance of going beyond what is usual, proper, or needed but you could also use Superfluous: 1a : exceeding what is sufficient or necessary : EXTRA b : not needed : UNNECESSARY 2 obsolete : marked by wastefulness : EXTRAVAGANT


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and now from the OED: a noun! TMI n. colloquial (originally in the language of electronic communications) too much information; usually implying disgust or disapproval in response to a disclosure of an excessively personal or graphic nature. As in: 1996 Lemonade & Pizza in alt.cosuard (Usenet newsgroup) 25 Mar. All the underwear in ...


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As usual, Grammerly can not think beyond the literal. Your sentence: 'We now have license to move beyond [an idea]. is correct. From the OED: license liberty (to do something), leave, permission. Now somewhat rare. †Also occasionally exemption from (something). †Formerly often in licence and leave; by, with, without (a person's) licence; to get, ...


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No. The noun form is "intrigue". I find it hard to believe that several writers use "intriguity"... unless you include the copywriters for the advertising material of the Indian IT company of that name: http://www.intriguity.com/


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It is not formally recognized (yet) by any dictionary of which I am aware, which is the usual metric for "real" English words. The closest words I can think of that conveys the same meaning might be fascination or interest.


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It is a "real word" in the sense that it is something that is attributed a colloquial, informal definition. It is not a "real word" in the sense that it is in the dictionary. If the word catches on, it could possibly earn an entry.


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I made a call to my friend I got or received a call from my friend These are idiomatic I had a call with my my friend is possible I had a talk with my friend is idiomatic


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If you want to express that you experienced a phone conversation with somebody, yes, it is correct to say "I had a call with..." in the same way you could say "I had a chat with..." when you don't want to specify how or if you met face to face for a few drinks "I had some drinks with..." That happens because the construction actually comes from the verb to ...


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Besides "indexes" sounding maybe a little more academic than "indicators," I don't see any difference between them in your example sentence. dictionary.com defines an index as "a pointer or indicator," so I think either is fine.


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As you've described, "authority", as used in that sentence, is a countable singular noun, so a determiner, such as an article, is missing. According to Quick and Dirty Tips: When to Use Articles Before Nouns: Nouns That Need Determiners Countable Singular Nouns Nouns That Don't Need Determiners Proper Nouns Plural Nouns Mass Nouns (Uncountable) Nouns ...


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There is another way. In your particular situation, you are giving a presentation to representatives from the offices of several attorneys general. That means that you are meeting with several state attorneys general (if you're meeting with the big cheeses themselves) or, if each one sends an associate, you are meeting with state attorney general ...


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The plural form of 'attorney general' The plural form of "attorney general" is less settled than fans of Eggs McMuffin might suppose. Here is the treatment of the plural issue in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary, eleventh edition (2003): attorney general n, pl attorneys general or attorney generals ... And here is the corresponding ...


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