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7

I'm not sure why Wikipedia says that. Traditionally, a lock of hair refers to hair that hangs together. The word lock has been used this way since Old English ("lock, n.1," def. 1a in the Oxford English Dictionary). While locks can be cut and collected, and lock of hair most commonly specifies such severed clusters of hair, lock of hair can also ...


2

The Code Duello uses the word "Challenged", as a noun.


3

Disquisition - A long or elaborate essay or discussion on a particular subject https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/disquisition


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The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by H&P (Page 444) defines "attributive modifiers" as follows: Internal modifiers in pre-head position are realised by DPs, AdjPs, VPs with past participle or gerund-participle heads, and nominals in plain or genitive case: Among which let's focus on AdjPs and nominals: ii a. his wry attitude b. ...


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There is no "adverbial objective" In “He went home” “Home” is an uncountable noun acting as the adverbial complement of “went” (sometimes called a dative, as in “He went to home.") In “The proposal is worth considering”, “worth considering” is an adjectival phrase and a complement. Considering is a gerund, (“The proposal is worth your/his/our,...


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Worth is somewhat a controversial word, there is a dispute about it being an adjective or a preposition (especially in sentences like It is worth two dollars). McCawley, R. Hyddleston and G. Pullum call it an adjective. I don't see any NOUN in your sentence that functions as an adverb modifying a verb. In The proposal is worth considering. H&P say ...


1

Generally speaking, Chinese English tests' cloze texts are full passages. The student wouldn't be encountering this sentence in isolation. If it were, Lawrence is right that A, B, & D would all be acceptable words; A would be less good because is suits it less well; B would be less good because there's no base level mentioned for the bonus to be added to;...


4

It may not be possible to define a rule here. What matters is what is idiomatic. In English, to be sent to market means to be offered for sale on the market. This is an abstract concept. The market has no physical location. This may occur in multiple places. "Around 85% of ducklings would survive this eight-week rearing process to be sent to market.&...


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In the example, positive is correct and is not used as the converse of negative but is used in the sense of OED 2. Explicitly laid down; expressed without qualification; admitting no question; stated, express, definite, precise; emphatic;" 1867 E. A. Freeman Hist. Norman Conquest I. App. 637 A strong presumption, though it is by no means positive ...


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Is there a noun that can be used to described an object or idea's ability to evoke emotion? You've asked for a word that covers ability to evoke emotion, but then in your example you include the word emotion, so it sounds like you just need a word for the ability to evoke? In this case source would work pretty well: As a universal source of emotion, music ...


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valediction- N. an act of bidding farewell valedictory- Adj. of or relating to a valediction : expressing or containing a farewell N. an address or statement of farewell or leave-taking valedictorian- N. person who delivers the valediction


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4

A less common one is buttonholer. Merriam-Webster defines buttonhole as to detain in conversation by or as if by holding on to the outer garments of So, a buttonholder forces you to listen to them as if they’d hooked the buttonhole of your jacket with their finger.


1

oblivious “not aware of or not noticing something, esp. what is happening around you” Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/oblivious


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pest Nuance: As annoying as a fly in the summer (Spanish proverb). One definition of pest (M-W): one that pesters or annoys : NUISANCE Example sentence: This guy is really annoying—he's such a pest! Words to describe boring and/or annoying: nudtnik (informal noun): a boring pest basically. tiresome (adjective): tiring, annoying, or boring (Cambridge). ...


15

Bore one that causes weariness and restlessness through lack of interest : one that causes boredom: such as a dull or tiresome person [Merriam-Webster] Is the standard noun in such circumstances. It is not specific for the example given, but the English language doesn’t work like a scientific taxonomy.


3

A word which can be used with either a positive or a negative connotation is persistent. According to Oxford Languages, it is defined as continuing firmly or obstinately in an opinion or course of action in spite of difficulty or opposition An example of the word being used with a negative connotation, as is the case in the question here, can be found in ...


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Blind. "A blind speaker, he did not see her facial expression of impatient annoyance, her furtive watch-checks, and her tightly-crossed arms."


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Stalker can be a strong word, as it means a person who stalks : a person who pursues someone obsessively and aggressively to the point of harassment (M-W) but in informal speech it is used to express annoyance, or to describe someone or oneself as annoying: I often hear people say, “I don’t want to look like a stalker.” (linkedin) “Oh, hi there,” I say ...


6

Do you mean importunate? If you describe someone as importunate, you think they are annoying because they keep trying to get something from you. [formal, disapproval] His secretary shielded him from importunate visitors. [Collins]


0

Despite being constantly cautioned by Windows, I use offendedness, as there doesn't seem to be any exact synonym for the state. e.g.: "We live in a climate of perpetual offendedness, the society of the inherently aggrieved."


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I know this is an old post, but the Time article uses totem, as it refers to the customized stamp "Document Produced to Independent Counsel", to mean emblem (emblematic). The meaning is in the following paragraph: "Created to help track the untold number of documents produced for independent counsel Ken Starr's investigations of the Clintons, ...


2

An examination of early instances of the plural of zero in English suggests that the more common spelling has long been zeros, which also seems to have appeared in English writing somewhat earlier than zeroes. Here is an Ngram chart for zeros (blue line) versus zeroes (red line) for the period 1760–1880: I started at 1760 to avoid a number of results from ...


0

here are some ballpark nouns that came to mind: a stir/ a stirring a tickle a rise/ a rising none are as all-purpose as touch but I think rise/rising comes close—- a sensation coming to form. Ooh actually how about: a sensation an indefinite bodily feeling something (such as a physical stimulus, sense-datum, or afterimage) that causes or is the object of ...


6

The Venus flytrap gets the "Venus" part of its name because its flowers are really pretty (like the goddess Venus) and are white, like the planet Venus in the sky. The plant is not from Venus. The "Flytrap" part comes from its obvious bug-eating attributes. This is, however...what shall I call it? A "comfortable fallacy." You ...


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