New answers tagged

1

I think you are looking for Chauvinism: a form of extreme patriotism and nationalism, a fervent faith in national excellence and glory. It is an irrational belief in the superiority or dominance of one's own group or people, who are seen as strong and virtuous, while others are considered weak or unworthy. A less strong but still apt term is Nationalism ...


1

There is no word or a short phrase that satisfies all the requirements of this question, that is, that it stand for (1) acting against one's considered, rational judgement about what one ought to do, (2) but in a way that does not affect others. (It is unclear whether it is also required that the term be a single word: the question is tagged as a single-word-...


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My answer: propensity [S] Why I recommend this word: Propensity describes the tendency a person has, which often involves bad behavior. Use cases: I have a propensity to indulge in watching online videos.


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in which they use the word "resiliency", rather than "resilience". The -cy suffix had several functions depending upon the root word. The examples in question are perhaps clearer than most in their original meanings (Quotes from OED): "resiliency" -> a tendency towards resilience †1. Tendency to rebound or recoil. [...] ...


0

I agree with commentators that context is desirable but in some contexts you may use “rubric”, which in general refers to a set of evaluative criteria, quality definitions, and authoritative rules.


3

First, I will answer your original question. Below the answer, you will find all of the information I have found about other usages for "hundreds" (there are probably some that I missed). They won hundreds of dollars; five hundreds to be precise! As the sources below state, the author—technically—should use "hundred" in this case. ...


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From the use in one of the examples at the entry for "hundred" (OALD) you can see that an s is probably not used. From this ngram and this one you have the confirmation that an s is never found after a number; it must be exceptional to find one.


1

While it may be O.K., "five hundreds" is not usual. The place of a digit in the number is called "units", "tens", "hundreds", and so on; but when talking about quantities, the only one to become plural is the unit: 1 unit, two or more units. The author you quote mentions "grammar books" recommending not to ...


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The answer would really depend on the authorizing organization’s perspective on their authority. Based on what has been said so far, I would prefer the word ”certificant” or to use the word ”certificated” as a descriptive adjective before the title of the person being certificated. As pointed out by other posters, certified, even when not being used to mean ...


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Yes Swaddle is also a noun, as seen in the third definition on Collins Dictionary: a cloth, bandage, etc. used for swaddling And also the fourth definition from the same page under British English: mainly US swaddling clothes In a search on Google Books for “in swaddles”, you can see many examples of its usage. Such as this one from In the Heart of the ...


0

Plastic or Malleable or Inchoate or similar words indicating something with substance that may lack a fixed form.


4

As others have said, English has no specific (single) words for different-looking owls. However, we use compound names for different-looking owls. According to The Spruce, there are more than 225 owl species in the world, divided into two families. Barn owls with their distinct heart-shaped facial disks make up the Tytonidae family, while all other owl ...


2

There are two types of owl. Wikipedia: Owls are divided into two families: the true (or typical) owl family, Strigidae, and the barn-owl family, Tytonidae. but there is no common distinction. The situation in French, German, Spanish, etc is similar to the English names for the members of the bird family of thrushes: there is a blackbird, a robin, a ...


4

No, English has no specific word for owls based on this characteristic. Terms for this feature in owls: Ear tuft [wikipedia], most widely-used Plumicorns [Merriam Webster Dictionary], in zoology Egret [Oxford English Dictionary], although this term more commonly refers to the species Egrets A tuft of feathers such as that borne by the Egret and some other ...


1

Short answer, no, In English an owl is an owl, there are no other pronunciation for it. Here is a bit more detail. Referenced from owl pages The word owl originated in early European languages. In old Norse, an Owl was known as "ugla", and in old German, it was "uwila". Both of these words may have been created as sounds that described ...


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Detractor would come close. Lexico detractor NOUN A person who disparages someone or something. There is no excuse, however, for a man in this enlightened age, who professes to be a spiritual leader of the people, to remain ignorant of an important fact, or to continue to see that fact through a false medium, when he has the opportunity of coming into Wall ...


0

The word that captures that attitude is Schadenfreude, and it is used often in English. Schadenfreude (/ˈʃɑːdənfrɔɪdə/; German: [ˈʃaːdn̩ˌfʁɔʏ̯də] 'harm-joy') is the experience of pleasure, joy, or self-satisfaction that comes from learning of or witnessing the troubles, failures, or humiliation of another. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schadenfreude


2

One word that may work for you is adversary. It has a considerably higher register than hater. one that contends with, opposes, or resists: an enemy or opponent — MW Also consider the adjective adversarial or perhaps a synonym of it such as hostile.


1

Velour, made hydrophobic… The other examples are grammatically correct in the example sentence, but linguistic monstrosities that as a biochemist I have never encountered and which I would never tolerate from any student of mine or in any journal article I should ever referee. But then, not everyone who has to publish in English actually speaks the language....


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The question is based on the incorrect assumption that beneficiary applies only to people or to legal inheritance as a result of death. The following is one of the senses used by Merriam-Webster to define beneficiary: 1 : a person or thing that receives help or an advantage from something : one that benefits from something     // The college was a ...


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