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I have heard what I take to be archaic English expressions in the rural South USA. One example is "get shed of" , which I first heard in rural Alabama circa 1974 (having just moved there). This sort of preservation of archaic or dialectal forms in "outlying" areas is well attested. I recently heard "get shut of" on some ...


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This question was asked on this forum. Here is a brief summary of the thread which answers your question: "I stand corrected" is usually the more common expression. "I stand to be corrected." means this according to a person on this forum: It's a quick way of saying 'I might be wrong about that statement I have just made and feel sure ...


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I think "spaghetti code" implies ineptitude, but it might also implies several developers and something that grew out of control over time. "Legacy code" is another excuse I hear for crap code. When a developer is speaking of their own garbage code they call it "quick and dirty" implying they just didn't have time to do a good ...


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It's more that it's for formal circumstances (I often use quite "formal" English with one particular friend, but this is not the sort of thing we say). I can't really offer a specific alternative without knowing what you're trying to tell your friend, but a couple of slightly more relaxed examples: Before we go, I need to [tell, warn, ...] you ...


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I remember “ information made him fat”


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There is a line in Madame Bovary (published in 1856): “Il ne faut pas toucher aux idoles: la dorure en reste aux mains.” Basically, "You should never touch your idols: a little of the gold always rubs off." I don't know if that's the oldest version, but it certainly seems to be the same meaning.


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Growing up in Wisconsin, a rather cold state located in the region referred to as the Midwest of the United States, we said, "It's colder than a witch's tit in a brass bra in the middle of February!"


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The same expression is used in English: Covid-19 Cases In India Cross 1 Million Mark, Deaths 25,000 Trudging through 50 miles of wind, rain worth it: I crossed the 30-mile mark around five hours into the day. A funny thing happened on the way to the scale: 50 pound mark Notably, this is about weight loss, just for an example of how the expression also ...


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I can't find anything shorter than a long phrase: smoke stream/ing/ed/ in through the chinks of the door where it meets the frame.


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Door gap is the general name for all of the gaps around the door. The best method for measuring door gap dimensions is to use a tool of the appropriate thickness that can be inserted between the door frame and door, the door and the floor, and between opposing vertical edges (aka, meeting stiles) of paired doors. (Doorgapgauge.com, emphasis added) ...


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None of the suggested translations work. Relancer has the TLFi I. B.- 3. acception, especially the third example: 3. Au fig. Poursuivre quelqu'un avec obstination pour en obtenir quelque chose. [Lisbeth] relança les deux tourtereaux jusque dans leur nid au Gros-Caillou (Balzac, Cous. Bette, 1846, p. 231). Testenel était taillé comme un taureau, mais lent et ...


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The most neutral term would be "follow (something) up with a customer", or you could say "chase a customer" if it is not the first time you are reminding them or they are late. Relancer can also imply harrassment (for example, if the client owes you money), in which case "pester a customer" or "badger a customer" would ...


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If K is doing this because 1 that is the way the rules say it should be done, and for no other reason, then he is being bureaucratic or a bureaucrat. 2 he simply does not want A to have the space, then he is being obstructive. 3 he hates A, then he is being spiteful or malicious. In BE, there is also K is “being a job’s-worth”(pejorative) – refusal to use ...


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David Pearce is absolutely correct. In fact, “That said”, “That having been said”, and “Having said that” are all equivalent and have been around for centuries. “That being said” is a monstrosity that incorrectly shortens “That having been said” and arose out of the blue in the last couple of decades. Of course, like a lot of linguistic monstrosities, it has ...


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The whole portion you have emphasized is an adjective phrase, an adjective clause with the subject pronoun and verb omitted; here's the full sentence as context for other readers: Eyes watering, they saw, flat on the floor in front of them, a troll even larger than the one they had tackled, out cold with a bloody lump on its head. You can parse this as &...


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You could use midwinter This is probably most famously used in the Christmas hymn "In the bleak midwinter". It's not a phrase you meet very often, but it's something which anyone hearing/reading it would immediately understand.


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Also, "depths of winter": the middle of winter : the coldest part of winter. (Merrian-Webster)


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A common expression for the coldest days in British English is brass monkey weather. Brass monkey weather: Extremely cold weather. [Cambridge English dictionary] Or it's cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey. Ice-cold, stone-cold,bone-chilling cold could also be used.


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hold up to continue in the same condition without failing or losing effectiveness or force She's holding up well under the pressure. Similar to stand up


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You can use the expression: dead of winter the middle of winter, when it is very cold: It was the dead of winter and the ground was covered in deep snow. (Cambridge Dictionary) The expression dead of is used to refer to: The period of greatest intensity of something, such as darkness or cold. For example, I love looking at seed catalogs in the dead of ...


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Although dawn is definitely used to refer to the onset or start of something, "the dawn of the twentieth century," I have never come across dusk being used in this way, despite "dawn to dusk" being a set phrase of opposites. Google Books does contain a few examples, but they seem to be translations from German. My preference would be for ...


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There are many words and expressions that you could use here. A single word would be pester. If the children are making noise and annoying you, you could say the children are setting my teeth on the edge. If something, especially a noise, sets your teeth on edge, it annoys you very much. [Cambridge English Dictionary] You could also say the children are ...


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It's not an expression I'm familiar with, and it sounds a little odd to me, but in context it's fairly clear what she means. Without the context provided in your sentence I would not have guessed the meaning. A more common English idiom would be to say that the children are "in your hair", which means "Irritating one, especially by impeding or ...


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"The degrees to which an individual..." means To What Extent or How far will they go to achieve their goal. I can see how your context mashes this phrase together with others until you are ready to break out the protractor, but neither Degrees nor Radians are used here. The degrees or extent to which a provider can work, is the meaningful part.


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Before we decipher “promote points of commonality,” let’s understand what the rest of the text means. Essentially, the author is writing about what to do when a young/developing industry becomes too competitive or the members’ interests differ. Now, we can start to decipher “points of commonality.” By looking at the antithesis of this phrase, we can ...


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More context is required to understand the full situation at hand, but I'd say with high probability that it means, "one vision after another", or "multiple visions in succession". Since you're talking about a "vision" (which isn't something physically tangible), it wouldn't make sense to interpret the phrase as "a vision ...


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Here's a context to anchor the differences between the two questions. In the game of baseball, occasionally the coach of the defensive team walks out to the pitcher's mound to consult with the pitcher. Perhaps the pitcher needs a little encouragement, or perhaps the coach feels he should be pulled out of the game and replaced with a relief pitcher. The ...


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I believe that both are correct. They are both understandable and unambiguous. To me, “resume normal operations” implies that it will resume its normal tasks. And “resume its normal operation” implies that it will operate in its normal manner. These implications are both clear and mean the same thing.


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I believe the word you're looking for is: licentious adjective formal disapproving US /laɪˈsen.ʃəs/ UK /laɪˈsen.ʃəs/ (especially of a person or their behavior) sexual in an uncontrolled and socially unacceptable way licentious. 2020. In dictionary.cambridge.com Retrieved on 25 July 2020 from https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/...


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Taking a sledgehammer to crack a nut would seem appropriate. See Collins for explanation.


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'Theory X is flooded with math jargon' might be the sort of informal phrase you're looking for.


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You could say that that person has belabored the mathematics in the description. belabor vt to explain, worry about, or work at unduly: belaboring an obvious point TFD Online


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How about over the top? From Lexico: over the top: To an excessive or exaggerated degree. Your example: S/he was over the top in her use of mathematics to describe X. For extra emphasis, you could say s/he was way over the top.


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In both business and sociology, a particular word used for this is demographic: [Merriam-Webster] 1 demographics plural : the statistical characteristics of human populations (such as age or income) used especially to identify markets    // a change in the state's demographics 2 business : a market or segment of the population identified by demographics    /...


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I do not think those phrases are related at all, neither in etymology nor in meaning. Grammatically, those two phrases use entirely different predicates - in "to stare down defeat", the predicate is the transitive "stare down", while in "to stare down the barrel of a gun", the predicate is the ambitransitive "stare". ...


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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precision_and_recall has Suppose a computer program for recognizing dogs in photographs identifies 8 dogs in a picture containing 12 dogs and some cats. Of the 8 identified as dogs, 5 actually are dogs (true positives), while the rest are cats (false positives). The program's precision is 5/8 while its recall is 5/12. In this ...


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Acidic is the correct translation when dealing with wine. Grapes contain malic acid, which gives them a “sour” or “tart” taste until they ripen. The wikipedia has an article on malic acid that’s quite informative: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malic_acid There’s a Japanese entry for malic acid: リンゴ酸 Malum is the Latin word for apple, so it looks like a ...


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OED: to stare down transitive. To stare at (someone) without being first to blink or lower one's gaze, usually as an expression of resistance or hostility; to outstare. Also figurative and in extended use. 1946 T. H. White Mistress Masham's Repose xiv. 115 Miss Brown searched out her pupil's eyes and fixed them with her own. She had a..trick of staring ...


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Lexico defines it as Devoted to a task or purpose. It gives the example ‘a team of dedicated doctors.’ So no, it's not a general trait of the person.


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"No-show," as that is common usage. Here is an easily looked-up Lexico definition: "A person who has made a reservation, booking, or appointment but neither keeps nor cancels it."


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Longman Dictionary of English Idioms (1979) offers this straightforward and intuitively reasonable explanation of "hedge one's bets": hedge one's bets coll[oquial] to try to make oneself safe against possible loss, esp. by putting money in other businesses: it is very important to hedge your bets in any business, but putting on plays in theatres ...


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'Hedge your bets' - meaning and origin. What's the origin of the phrase 'Hedge your bets'? Hedge has been used as a verb in English since at least the 16th century, with the meaning of 'equivocate; avoid commitment'. An example of this comes in Shakespeare's Merry Wives of Windsor, 1600: I, I, I myself sometimes, leaving the fear of God on the left hand ...


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In this case it means that individuals are adding the potential profit from renting out the new property to the change in their wealth by acquiring the property. (This is clearly speculative as the property may fail to rent, or may fail to rent for the expected value, or may be even accrue costs from rental not covered by it). For example: if the property ...


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This is really about law, not English, but easy enough. In US law, not only is a defendant allowed to remain silent, but the fact that he/she remained silent cannot be used against them at a trial. For example, at the time of trial, if the defendant claims they were with someone when the crime happened, the prosecution is not allowed to say "well why ...


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In this case you would have to search for the word "pivot" as opposed to "risks pivot upon" as the author is trying to bring attention to the three factors which are central to the "risks" of the tailored agile implementation. You could say the three factors are connected to the risks of the implementation as a pivot (the three ...


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I read it, as you say, as "depends upon". It seems like a variant of "hinge upon", a hinge being a thing that pivots.


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