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2 votes

How to say "we put something under a square root"?

*The reason for putting the original distances under square root is discussed later. The reason for taking/using the square root of the original distances is discussed later.
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1 vote

Origin of “as all get out” meaning “to the utmost degree”

The following is pure speculation by me. I do not know that it is true, and I have no evidence to support anything that you are about to read. It’s referencing a situation where all the animals break ...
  • 11
0 votes

How do we express "hidden bad surprises" in correct English?

Kindly look at these 3 answered questions. Though not exact duplicates, you will find many useful words in the answers. Something appears valuable or precious but it isn't, symbolically equivalent ...
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1 vote

What do you call "testing if a probability will trigger or not"

In game development, this might be termed a proc, but this may not be a term of art in your field. Short for either "procedure" or "programmed random occurrence" (depending on who ...
  • 909
0 votes

"effective and efficient estimation" or "accurate and efficient estimation"?

None of the above. Just say it's an estimation technique. The summary should allow you to describe what you mean by efficient, accurate, and effective. Is it accurate in the root mean squares sense? ...
  • 8,654
0 votes

"effective and efficient estimation" or "accurate and efficient estimation"?

Both phrases are grammatically correct. Feel free to use either one. I reccomend that you spend less time agonizing over how to title your paper and you spend more time focusing the content. Below is ...
1 vote

What do you call "testing if a probability will trigger or not"

The condition was satisfied. There are a few things to parse here. Use words very carefully and things will be clear. First, the probability p is a number between 0 and 1 inclusive. It doesn't occur ...
  • 8,654
0 votes

What do you call "testing if a probability will trigger or not"

The word you are looking for is "event" For example, we might write, "with probability 0.5718 the event will occur. Probabilities are numeric quantities, such as 89.2% Events are things ...
0 votes

How to correct this sentence in more clear way?

Last part first "and we follow up their method" Do you want to say this in the present tense or in the past tense? And "author" is singular, therefore "their" needs to ...
  • 577
0 votes

How can I say in one word "number written in words"?

"Phobia" in one word. Jk. Reality is that since we don't write checks anymore and the symbols are already embedded into buttons. "Inscribe" is the word you maybe thinking of.
  • 1
1 vote

"power of persuasion" (singular) vs. "powers of persuasion" (plural)

They're probably interchangeable in general, but I think the singular form refers to a general ability to persuade, while the plural form refers to a number of different techniques (flattery, coercion,...
  • 17.6k
0 votes

What does the expression "as bad as it is" mean?

It's wrong. It's common parlance now, and has been for 20 or 30 years; but it's still wrong. These days we say As bad as it is, it could be a whole lot worse when we SHOULD say Bad as it is, it could ...
2 votes
Accepted

"The crowd chooses Barabbas" meaning?

I'm going to make the assumption that the statement you read is one of general principle, i.e. meaning "The crowd will always choose Barabbas". It's obviously metaphorical, since the literal ...
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2 votes

"The crowd chooses Barabbas" meaning?

Your interpretation is correct. There are many other ways to put it. I will try a few: Crowds make history but not always truth. Crowds can be manipulated: "But the chief priests and elders ...
  • 18.9k
1 vote

English phrase for "Don't try to solve too many problems at the same time or you will mess up and have no time for real work"

Your "naive/clueless new boss" is spreading himself/herself too thin." Spread yourself too thin to try to do a lot of different things at the same time, with the result that you cannot ...
  • 6,658
1 vote

Is ‘in/of the world’ required after ‘many/several/a lot of/some countries’?

You are right that of the world is, strictly speaking, redundant (setting aside some science-fiction scenarios). However, redundancy, as has been pointed out a number of times on this site, is not ...
  • 6,979
1 vote

Is 'Can you make sure...?' rude?

No matter how much you soften it, make sure is rude addressed to your boss. You could express it differently, I would be grateful if you could do this by the end of the week so that we can complete ...
  • 18.9k
1 vote

Is "in the briefest of moments" a good synonym for "in the twinkling of an eye"?

There's nothing wrong with "in the briefest of moments" - it's grammatical, and the meaning will certainly be understood. But I wouldn't say that it's particularly poetic; it's quite literal ...
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