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While not common in everyday conversation, this particular usage ("to B from A") is often used in journalism, especially where changes in numbers are concerned. In a news story, the "to" figure is often put first to clarify that this is the current state. The "from" figure is put after that to show the rate of increase/decrease ...


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"Concerning Hobbits", the first section of the prologue of The Fellowship of the Ring, from which the quotation in the question was taken, begins: This book is largely concerned with Hobbits, and from its pages a reader may discover much of their character and a little of their history. Further information will also be found in the selection from ...


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I don't have my Tolkein right in front of me, but I would interpret this to mean that Tolkein has already given a very brief description of the people of Middle Earth (or maybe just Hobbits) and postulates that many readers might want to know more right away rather than jumping right into the story narrative. I interpret "from the outset" to mean ...


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The phrase from the outset doesn't imply that the readers have no prior knowledge at all. In fact, the definiteness of the phrase this remarkable people shows that the people in question have already been mentioned, and so the reader does in fact know something about them (at least that they exist, if nothing else). The phrase from the outset refers to the ...


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After puzzling over this phrase for quite some time I came across the possible answers offered in this site. The one that seemed to show the most promising solution was the longest entry, which included the possibility of there being a verb “to lam” meaning “to run.” I found just such a verb in the English Dialect Dictionary, a somewhat now forgotten, yet ...


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I always interpreted it as a truncation of "Here goes nothing," in which context "nothing" is the thing that's going and "here" is where it's going. It's the same sort of syntactic inversion you see in contexts like "There goes ____" and "Here comes ____".


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All-inclusive, as in hotel Google, define all inclusive: including everything or everyone, i.e. "an all-inclusive holiday" Denoting or relating to a holiday in which all or most meals, drinks, and activities are included in the overall price The all-inclusive model originated in the French Club Med resorts, which were founded by the Belgian Gérard ...


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(Adjective) REBELLIOUS = showing a desire to resist authority, control and want to break rules. Ex. Some students become very rebellious and haven't follows the school rules


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It seems best not to think with air quotes when writing. Your statement "... since it could be considered a part of the current context" is good as is. "could be considered" seems equivalent to the proverbial air quotes.


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There were several prior uses of the phrase "by flood and by field" and "by flood and field". It means by water and by land. For example, The Enigmatical entertainer and mathematical associate for the year 1829, No. II at page 56 says: While he will his “ voyages and travels ” recount , “ By flood and by field " what he's had to ...


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I would go with "old school". Not exact. But fits the sentence without added complexity of determining if an idea is false. A colleague joked, at one point, that things would have gone better in the pandemic if we still believed in old school "get some fresh air".


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how could one family have two dynasty? You're misinterpreting the passage. The Kushans were a culture/society that formed an empire in India. It says that there were two families that formed two separate ruling dynasties. The first was the Kadphises and the second was the Kanishka. The Kanishka directly followed on from the Kadphises, therefore they are ...


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Looking at a couple of different sources, your phrase is completely acceptable. However, it would create a greater impact on the readers if you divided the above example into two sentences. "What happened, happened. The past cannot be changed." The fact that you're using a comma to separate the two "happened"'s, makes it all the more ...


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A recent coinage for the concept you raise is epistemic innocence. This term comes from the interdisciplinary Project PERFECT, which investigates whether false beliefs (especially delusions, distorted memories, and beliefs that don't reflect social realities) could have positive effects. When inaccurate beliefs do convey a benefit, they may possess epistemic ...


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Bumping this thread – it seems like there isn't a consensus on either being appropriate to describe going on a long side tangent. Is there another phrase besides rat holes and rabbit holes that would be accurate?


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My guess is that it is a nonsense word and it's origin has no meaning other than thought adequately silly by it's inventor.


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From time immemorial, all that has been endowed with life is as soon as its birth promised to death, never free from the menace of death until, always, a final decisive onslaught; there is no exception, and this inexorable action of death which is rendered by "grim", meaning "sternly serious", is figuratively seen as the inescapable ...


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The adjective "grim" was a later, emphatic addition: OED P8(b)b. colloquial. Also like grim death. Frequently with to hold on, to hang on, etc.: with great determination or tenacity. Originally with allusion to death personified; cf. sense 1c (below). 1786 R. Burns Poems 25 Then Burnewin comes on like Death, At ev'ry chap. 1804 Lit. Mag. &...


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A 'Quick fix' solution comes to mind. There is anther one related to plasters/band-aids but I can't remember it. Quick fix: : an expedient usually temporary or inadequate solution to a problem. www.merriam-webster.com › dictionary › quick fix 'When it comes to correcting a problem in your organization, you should make sure you are, in fact, fixing the ...


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There is always the colourful expression When you are up to your ass in alligators it's difficult to remind yourself that your objective was to drain the swamp and its variations. This carries the same connotation of being too busy dealing with a host of urgent problems to get on with the main task. It's fairly obviously American in origin (we don't get many ...


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The English equivalent is almost identical to the Greek one. It is If Muhammed won't go to the mountain then the mountain must go to Muhammed". I've known that for seventy years and I've never heard the reversed one that you claim is the English version. However I'm British, perhaps the reversed one is American.


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Consider this a partial answer, since it fits your example but is less versatile than the original expression. I have heard this cliche used multiple times, and the full version goes something like this: If you can't come to the party, we'll bring the party to you. This basically means that if someone can't go out, nonetheless the event can be brought to ...


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one way or the other has a neutral sense: which of two possibilities will be chosen: They've had two weeks to think about it, and now they have to decide one way or the other. As for your intended use in “Since you couldn’t come over, I came instead.” That is, one way or the other, we were able to meet.


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The super-standard expression is exponential in n, provided you understand that in many contexts, it includes a broader range of functions than just the one you've written. Basically, exponential in n means that the 'dominant scaling' with n is exponential. For example, for every one of the following functions, there are fields where it would be described as ...


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It's not an exponentional function. Using normal variable attributes, x is a real variable and n is an integer variable. So x^n is a monomial of x raised to n, or more formally, x^n is a monomial of x of degree n. Wikipedia: monomial <Can we please get mathjax support here on EL&U!!!> A monomial, also called power product, is a product of powers ...


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"Function f is exponential [OPTION] n". Function f is exponential base x, exponent n. or just Function f is exponential with exponent n. Note: You cannot simply state "wrt n" because that would be ambiguous for a two argument function.


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The word "trope" has two meanings. I think Lexico's examples are attached to the wrong definitions! The second definition is: A significant or recurrent theme; a motif. So your quote says, "Both clothes and illness became significant or recurrent themes for new attitudes toward the self." Without the context it's hard to explain any ...


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I have always seen a plaster statue of a saint as an object of veneration and respect, Unfortunately, the rest of UK had not had the same experience: Some background… up until the late 18th century, “Plaster saints” were associated with Catholics who were seen as dangerous, weird, and enemies of civilisation as their allegiance was to the Pope and not the ...


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To "answer the call," it means to metaphorically look within, and follow, what you refer to as "your gut" "your soul" or "your heart" is willing you to do. Take a chance, and lean into what you understand not.


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To expand a little on Dale M's answer and answer the questions in your comment on that answer: "Get the train" is similar to "take the train" in that it refers to the concept of travelling by train to a specific destination rather than the physical action of boarding it. Having said that it refers more to arriving at the station in time ...


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Take "Take the train" is a reference to the entire journey by train. For example: "How will you get to London?" "I will take the train/bus/plane." Get on/off, Get in/out These are largely interchangeable. On and off have the general connotation that one is on top of something while in and out have the connotation of being within ...


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Both forms reference concurrent actions. That is person A is doing one thing at the same time as person B is doing something else. However "You do A while I do B" suggests that the two actions are to be started simultaneously and completed in a similar time frame. In fact the suggestion is that A should be completed either at the same time as or, ...


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It seems to me that in option 1 neither event has happened as yet. But in option 2 you could be in the process of actually polishing the car while instructing the others. Option 1 (imo) sounds way more natural but both 1 and 2 are OK. Also in option 2 both the polishing and the drying can be done at some other time in the future, i.e, the drying can be done ...


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I first heard the expression in the film "Dead Man Walking". It was called out loudly as the guards were walking the condemned man from his holding cell to the place of execution. In the film, the act of announcing "dead man walking" came across as a sort of cold-blooded taunt, without any actual purpose other than as a a macabre ritual ...


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Your question asks about the following forms: You do this while I do that. You do this while I’m doing that. It’s arguable that the continuous form can apply to the situation where “that” is currently being performed whereas the base form can’t carry that sense. But both sentences can also idiomatically convey the same sense - an apportionment of roles ...


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You go while I polish the car. You dry yourselves while I'm polishing the car. Does that help?


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“Dodged the bullet” is a phrase used in this context. dodge a bullet or less commonly dodge the bullet to narrowly avoid an unwelcome, harmful, or disastrous outcome or occurrence coastal towns dodged a bullet when the hurricane veered out to sea https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dodge%20the%20bullet The 20th century geopolitical example is ...


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This doesn't answer your question directly, but the concept you described seems related to "survivorship bias." Survivorship bias or survival bias is the logical error of concentrating on the people or things that made it past some selection process and overlooking those that did not, typically because of their lack of visibility. This can lead to ...


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My grandmother, who grew up in Iowa and whose grandparents immigrated from Germany, described her cousins as “dutchy.” When I asked her to clarify what she meant, she said they were not popular or stylish.


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I was told in the 80's by a Vietnam Veteran that the definition was derived from the American Helicopter crews greasing the skids of helicopters to prevent people, (AVRN Forces and civilians) from trying to hitch rides. This can be confirmed in the book, The Vietnam War: The History of America's Conflict in Southeast Asia By General William C. Westmoreland. ...


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In modern usage pray means ask a deity, and by extension hope strongly. "Pray, no" would mean "I really hope I didn't", and "Just pray no" would mean "Just hope/pray that the answer is no".


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Pray in this since is used in place of "please". It is from a Shakespearean usage, if I'm correct. 'I pray you' = 'I am asking you, please' Also, prithee = 'I pray thee'. Pray basically means to ask. To super-politely ask would be to ask, and add, if it pleases you.


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Chambers, after listing definitions of the intransitive use of "protest", defines the transitive use thus: "to make a solemn declaration of; to declare; to declare the non-acceptance or non-payment of (a bill of exchange)". It then lists two definitions tagged (Shakesp) and one tagged (Milton), and, lastly, "to make a protest against&...


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Hard to say. It could mean: If you think I love you, you've caught the wrong idea and should keep trying for a better thought. If you think I love you, keep trying and I might come around. If you think I love you, try if you want to but it's hopeless (delivered with sarcasm). I'd probably go for the first one.


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The first use in Merriam-Webster online is "to make solemn declaration or affirmation of" (e.g. protest my innocence). So I agree that you most often hear protest as being against something but the word can also be used to affirm. Dictionary Reference


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The expression is "(to be) at a loss for words". https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/at%20a%20loss%20for%20words#:~:text=chiefly%20US,at%20a%20loss%20for%20words.


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Browsing through auctions, I came across a postcard album from 1910, and one of the postcards had the phrase "Ich ka bibble" written on it. Handwritten, as part of the letter. It was an online auction, so I couldn't see the postmark, but the postcards where it was visible were dated 1910, as was the inscription in the album itself.


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We have a bengali saying to describe such a person. When translated to English it goes something like this: When you drop a fish from the small pond into the big pond, it dances around in wild excitement.


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The only senses in which I can imagine the phrase "come true" being used when discussing anything other than predictions or dreams is in relation to A: Breeding plants and animals and B: In the discussion of materials which distort under some conditions but return to a straight shape when the conditions change. For example I can imagine A: That ...


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You can use single source. In the documentation world, it means that one source file can generate every needed output format. Single-sourcing is the use of a single document to produce other forms of documents, such as manuals and online help. It allows one document to be used in different kinds of formats, thereby increasing the usability of the ...


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