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1

Yes, it absolutely can. Of course, the nuance of the new version is slightly different - the first one seems to emphasise that, in other places, free speech is indeed still more of an idea (basically, it's a criticism), while the second is more assertive. It announces the fact that it is "here and only here that free speech truly prevails" It's a very fine ...


0

If you could not find much usage of "You could never tell me the odds..." then it is unlikely to be idiomatic (and it isn't). I suggest: What were the chances of there being a "Now Hiring" sign on the coffee shop window? Google Ngram viewer shows:


0

The sharks are circling If the sharks are circling, then something is in danger and its enemies are getting ready for the kill. UsingEnglish.com This fits very well for the situation of having multiple bosses waiting to tear you apart the moment they see an opportunity to strike. (Unlike vultures circling, which means waiting for something to die / ...


0

As a (wryly or darkly) humorous description of the situation, a pigeon among the cats would work just fine, and would be understood as an inversion of the common phrase: Man, working for those guys was the worst job I ever had. You could say they really set a pigeon among the cats when they placed me there! A web search shows that A Pigeon among the ...


0

If predators (toxic bosses, etc.) are waiting to swoop in, you could say that the vultures are circling: If the vultures are circling, then something is in danger and its enemies are getting ready for the kill.


0

There is also Throwing firecrackers This can be combined with various settings Throwing firecrackers in church Throwing firecrackers off an overpass Throwing firecrackers in the toilet etc.


3

According to the Phrase Finder, “get shut of” meaning get rid of is an obsolete expression: To get shut of something does seem to be a rather old expression, and more a dialectal than a mainstream one, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, which I quote with all its citations. From the OED: " 11. a. To set (a person) free from, relieve of (...


3

If you wish to escape the same idiomatic throwing a prey to a predator: Walking (or Forced to walk) through a minefield. Where any misstep would obviously result in your death (scolding, criticism, demotion, etc). Sally's new project was like walking through a minefield. Everywhere she turned, someone was waiting to revel in her mistakes. This might ...


16

The more modern version of this sentiment is to throw someone under the bus. As The Free Dictionary notes, it means To exploit someone's trust for one's own purpose, gain, or agenda; to harm someone through deceit or treachery. Senator Davis was supposed to be working with me to bridge the gap between Democrats and Republicans on the issue of gun ...


69

If someone is sacrificing the employee in order to satisfy the other tyrant bosses, then perhaps Throw someone to the wolves Fig. to sacrifice someone to save the rest; to abandon someone to harm. (Fig. on the image of giving one person to the wolves to eat so the rest can get away.) The Free Dictionary


42

Probably: Throw to the lions: Figuratively, to be thrown to the lions is to be placed in a difficult situation for which one is completely unprepared: “To put that new teacher in front of those unruly students is to throw her to the lions.” Origin: During Roman persecutions Christians were thrown to the lions in the Colosseum. (Dictionary.com)


-1

I like the old-fashioned but great: "Zounds!" Defined as interj. archaic, humorous expressing surprise or indignation ‘‘Zounds,’ said the Admiral, ‘it goes on for ever.’’ Not exactly informal, but not exclusively formal. A contraction of "God's wounds" (those of Christ on the Cross), it can be pronounced zuːndz (zoo-nds) or zaʊndz (...


-1

"Freudian slip" could also apply. Sigmund Freud argued that personality is formed through conflicts among three fundamental structures of the human mind: the id, ego, and superego. He thought that one's true suppressed [sexual] feelings can show themselves, slip out in error, when one is under stress and unable to maintain the facade constructed to hide ...


0

If selling to England I think you should use "Scrubbing" rather than "Scrubber". 'Scrubber' has a rather unfortunate connotation; it refers to an amateur 'lady of easy virtue', or a lady known to have a number of 'gentlemen friends'... "8 Scrubbing Brushes" would work. "8-piece" would imply you need to join them together to make them work. "8-pieces" is ...


0

The idiom: don't look at me TFD An exclamation of innocence from a general accusation or implication of wrongdoing, with the emphasis placed on "me." As in: Jane: "All right, which one of you kids broke the vase in the living room?" Tom: "Don't look at me! I've been playing outside all day!"


-1

https://dictionary.cambridge.org self-incrimination meaning: 1. saying or doing something that shows that you are guilty of a crime: "That's self-incrimination," said the officer. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-incrimination Self-incrimination can occur either directly or indirectly: directly, by means of interrogation where information of a self-...


-1

If it is in formal english, it use "eight pieces of scrubber brushes". For advertising, it often use numeral value "Package of 8" or "Package of eight pieces" on "eight pieces" on the first line and "Scrubber brush"(not plural) to describe the item that are selling.


2

I have checked the compound preposition(double preposition) list in the Internet and I can't find "with of" is in the list. There is 'with use of something', 'with help of something', etc. I think with of isn't grammatically correct anyway.


2

I believe the phrase you're looking for is, "unprovoked denial." I was trying to remember it too so I did a quick search and came across your question. When I found it in my notes, I came back to your post to let you know.


1

The problem you are facing is not truly one of grammaticality. Rather, you are trying to state a ratio without making the formula incorrect. Both of your sentences, while clunky, are grammatical. Translation is the art of making something understandable. As long as you are not changing the underlying scientific point, you can take a bit of license in the ...


0

Your sentences are grammatically correct. However, they aren't just awkward; they border on unintelligible. It's also not clear to me why you are looking for an alternative to percent to express the mass of some mixture component relative to the mass of the mixture. However, you could use any of: ...10% sugar by weight (in water) ...10% sugar in ...


-3

I would say that this is the right way to use it in the middle of a word; however, I don't encourage its use in public. The best way to use it is somewhere in a sentence, because it makes more sense.


0

It appears it is probably derived from the much older version of “don’t say boo to a goose” where the idiomatic sense of boo is “nothing”. not say boo (US informal) to say nothing: You didn't say boo to me about going to your mother's this weekend. (also (US) be afraid to say boo); (UK not say boo to a goose) (Cambridge Dictionary) ...


7

Like the OP, I first discovered this unusual expression on Stack Exchange. Moderators on Stack Exchange are not employees, they are volunteers who have special privileges and powers that help them moderate a community. They are identifiable by the diamond ♦ next to their username, and they have either been appointed by the company or elected by their peers....


6

Wally, the engineer who is going "write a mini-van", is going to intentionally abuse the incentive system by intentionally creating bugs, then claiming the ten-dollar bonus for fixing each bug. That can be done much faster than finding and fixing existing bugs, so it's a quick way to "earn" enough money to buy a minivan. The larger point of the comic is ...


0

Isn't Polish your mother tongue by chance? ;) A different situation to consider. You're driving to work in the morning, you're thinking about different things and then, bam!, you realize you'd left the iron on. You couldn't say then, "I reminded myself I'd left the iron on." You say, "I remembered I'd left the iron on."


0

Using the whole Buffalo in cooking terms would be nose to tail. From "What is nose to tail?" at Organic and Quality Foods: Recently there’s been a movement towards nose to tail eating. That is, consuming many different parts of an animal, so it doesn’t go to waste. … Here in Australia, the nose to tail movement is picking up momentum with farms such ...


0

A variant of you're your own worst enemy can be bent to fill almost any sentence structure, such as Person 2 says, "You're being your own worst enemy". If you say that someone is their own worst enemy, you mean that their own behaviour causes most of their problems. TFD


1

Zero waste seems to be a standard term. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_waste http://zwia.org says : “Zero Waste: The conservation of all resources by means of responsible production, consumption, reuse, and recovery of products, packaging, and materials without burning and with no discharges to land, water, or air that threaten the environment or ...


0

I would have picked the correct answer, 'everywhere and nowhere' because the other options are all wrong. I came here because I was using this exact expression to describe the bitcoin network, I'm not exactly sure if it's the correct use so I searched the internet for an answer. The way I have always understood this expression (as a native English, English ...


0

As in: not one iota TFD an idiom The plant wasted not one iota of raw materials in its production of X. not a single, tiny bit; not at all. An iota is something very small like a dot, a mote, something miniscule.


2

Well the phrase- 'Denial ain't just a river in Egypt' comes into my mind. This phrase is often used as a humorous and witty response to a person who is in denial i.e, in short, is protesting too much about something which he/she may subconsciously know what's correct. I think it resonates with the phrase- 'The lady doth protest too much' reasonably well ...


2

Pity, Craig Philips answer has been deleted. It was he who mentioned that the British English expression was featured in the popular BBC quiz show, QI. The QI episode, which mentions knobstick weddings is to be found in Series K, episode 4, Knits & Knots, broadcast in 2013, and hosted by Stephen Fry. Stephen Fry: If you want to tie the knot at a ...


21

Nowadays, British English speakers may also use "shotgun wedding." The British National Corpus has a large number of samples of British English through the mid-1990s. Here are the three results that come up for shotgun wedding. . Of course somebody, Who Shall Be Nameless, would bring up the subject of Burns-And-You-Know-What, and how many of his ...


20

Historically, the term knobstick wedding was used in British English, though the term is now obsolete. From Wikipedia: A knobstick wedding is the forced marriage of a pregnant single woman with the man known or believed to be the father. It derives its name from the staves of office carried by the church wardens whose presence was intended to ensure ...


3

Green’s Dictionary of Slang shows jiminy! as an exclamation used also in oaths from late 17th century: (also jeemeny! jemeny! jeminy! jemminy! jimmini! jimminy! jimmy!) a euph. for Jesus! and used as such in oaths. 1686 [UK] D’Urfey Commonwealth of Women Epilogue: Oh jemminy! what is the cause of that? 1694 [UK] D’Urfey Comical ...


9

And from Etymonline an interjection: Jiminy (interj.) exclamation of surprise, 1803, colloquial form of Gemini, a disguised oath, perhaps Jesu Domine "Jesus Lord." Extended form jiminy cricket is attested from 1848, according to OED, and suggests Jesus Christ (compare also Jiminy Christmas, 1890). It was in popular use in print from c. 1901 and ...


31

From Hugh Rawson, A Dictionary of Euphemisms and Other Doubletalk (1981): Jiminy Cricket. The cute Walt Disney character notwithstanding, this is a euphemism for "Jesus Christ," on a par with Judas Christopher, Judas Priest, cripes, and jingo. The "Jiminy" comes from "Gemini," which goes back to at least 1664, and which may derive from the Latin Jesu ...


0

I would call this a propaganda facade. Propaganda is the spreading of ideas, information, or rumor for the purpose of helping or injuring an institution, a cause, or a person. A facade is a false or superficial appearance. North Korea has long been famous for this. In 2012, a wrong turn by a press bus allowed a glimpse behind the facade. The Kim family's ...


0

Yes, most grammars consider this 'be' a subjunctive. But since 'be that as it may' could be literally interpreted as 'though it may be that', in all likelihood, I think that 'be' is better analyzed as a bare infinitive rather than an imperative form. Note also that the imperative form is always used as a main clause in Present-day English, but that 'be ...


1

It appears to be an archaic form that has persisted as a colloquialism in modern English. "Be" is the verb "to be", connected to "that"; so the phrase essentially means "That is as it may [be]...". To address your comparison to "Let that be as it may...", you could reasonably understand it as an equivalent to "For the sake of this discussion, let's say ...


0

It comes from the old telegraph signals. If you were grounded then you were not able to send or receive telegraph signals because your wire was connected to a ground stopping transmissions which was long before any kind of aeroplane was invented.


1

In 2017 Alternative Facts became an ironic term for official positions without hard factual basis, based on an interview response given by US counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway, though granted this term is not very applicable outside of American discourse.


2

"Talk is about what is lacking" suggests "empty vessels make the most noise", but again this is mostly aimed at an individual - and also carries implications of foolishness and ignorance. The Glorious Leader sounds like they're practising doublespeak (from Orwell's doublethink). Something along the lines of “The past was alterable. The past never had been ...


2

The have to meaning, especially when got is not preceded by have, is typically used in spoken speech in very informal contexts (if it appears in writing, it is normally just a transcription of something spoken). In such spoken contexts, this got to is typically pronounced as gotta, and in writing it is often transcribed as such (see e.g. here). Thus, in ...


0

To leave the mining metaphors behind, we could use a more broad idiom: Clear road: Item 3 Free of any obstructions or unwanted objects. ‘with a clear road ahead he shifted into high gear’ (The above clear road/high gear can be figurative or not) When you are able to use your knowledge to transform your feelings into a positive and productive force, you ...


0

I believe it addresses different options. It's about people refusing to agree on something. So the solution is to call things off


2

The example in the title of the question is quite different from the example in the body of the question. It's not possible to answer both in the same way. Therefore, two different words are required: 1. "Oh, that's just old Aunt Kathy." This is an example of dismissiveness. From the definition of dismissive: : serving to dismiss or reject someone or ...


1

hackney TFD v To cause to become banal and trite through overuse. adj Banal; trite. As in a hackneyed (hackney) phrase: hackneyed as an adjective - repeated too often; over-familiar through overuse; "bromidic sermons"; "his remarks were trite and commonplace"; "hackneyed phrases"; "a stock answer"; "repeating threadbare jokes"; "...


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