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This has a lot to do with the context in which the statement/observation is being made. In the example provided educate would be a good option. We could say that the HR Manager educated the said employee on how such behavior can be perceived as sexist or racist. to direct is also a good option. This is more high handed and assertive than to educate. This ...


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How about reprove (the verb form) and reproof (the noun form)? To reprove someone is to express disappointment, disapproval, and criticism. An even stronger word (but perhaps a little too assertive) is the word rebuke. a sharp, stern disapproval of; reprove; reprimand; censure; admonish; reproach: rebuke his bad behavior


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remind: Cause (someone) to fulfil an obligation or to take note of something. with object and clause ‘the barman reminded them that singing was not permitted’ with object and infinitive ‘she reminded me to be respectful’ lexico: https://www.lexico.com/definition/remind


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Though a non-English speaker, to me agenda driven means someone is bent on proving his idea no matter what it takes. He disregards objectivity and is not willing to determine the truth but only to think up whatever proofs he could that would make his idea look right and justified. The examples were Southern slave owners who claimed that their enslavement of ...


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Off the top of my head: grabfest.


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If you're willing to be obscure, "auroral" can mean "of or pertaining to the dawn" (from the Roman goddess of the dawn), though this usage is swamped by the atmospheric phenomenon. The variant "aurorean" is more restricted to the dawn meaning, but is also even more obscure. (The Cambridge dictionary doesn't have the dawn meaning nor "aurorean"; Merriam-...


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Referring someone is simply directing a person's attention to another person without mentioning any qualifications. Recommending someone is saying that the person has a good rating.


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I think I would use matinal, which the OED holds to have the same meaning as matutinal. However the latter they designate as now chiefly literary. The examples they provide, for matinal across three main senses, are as follows: = matutinal adj. 1. 1803 M. Charlton Wife & Mistress (ed. 2) II. i. 11 To attend the matinal déjeuné's of ...


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matutinal adjective [formal] happening in the morning: We chatted over our matutinal coffee. [Cambridge Dictionary] Though normal people have morning coffee.


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Why not use "matin", as in "matins" (morning devotions)? I would even use "matinal", though it might not be in every dictionary. "My usual matinal activities always include breakfast and prayers."


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A badge is originally, and still is; in heraldic terms, any emblem used by an armiger (a person with an achievement of arms) on his standard (a type of flag which is not a banner) and used by his followers. For instance, the three feathers in a crown, with the text "Ich dien" (I serve) under, is the badge of the prince of Wales. And as a badge, it is not ...


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Neither is used in the US. I just heard a judge on a British TV drama say "I am minded to agree...." I've never heard that phrase before. "I have a mind to" is the American version, but it's obscure/old fashioned. Also, "I am inclined to" is used currently in America.


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There's nothing rude about the word "leave". What might be impolite about saying I'm leaving now, is not the word "leave", but the fact that you're leaving abruptly in the middle of something without apologizing for it. You could say I'm really sorry, but I need to leave now, or I wish I could stick around, but I have to go, or something ...


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(1) An offer is open-ended; it puts something in front of another person leaving that person free to accept or reject the offer. E.g. "We offer several afternoon activities for you to consider." "Please offer a cold drink to our guests." (2) A suggestion is a soft way of presenting an idea for something to happen; you may hear people say, "Never mind, it ...


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No they aren't synonyms and yes there is a difference (do try to phrase the question in the heading in the same way as in the body of the text). Blackmail means attempting to make someone do (or not do) something by threatening to reveal certain information. This information need not be true but will cause damage. Extortion means attempting to make ...


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Phoneticians are mostly interested in the articulation and physical nature of the sounds of a language, while phonologists try to construct entire sound systems for languages, including their acquisition and development over time. Often, linguists have interests in both areas.


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Obtuse may work, as it can refer to insensitivity as well as the lack of wit or smarts of someone who demonstrates such insensitivity. Merriam-Webster: 2a : lacking sharpness or quickness of sensibility or intellect : insensitive, stupid He is too obtuse to take a hint. So to include that in your present example, obtuse would describe ...


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Tactless also is from music but doesn't carry an offensive overtone. having no tact; unaware or intentionally inconsiderate of someone else's feelings


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I would say anachronism: someone or something placed in the wrong period in history, or something that belongs to the past rather than the present Cambridge


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Consider holdover. Although primarily used to refer to people from a previous administration, it can be used for anything that continues to persist beyond its usefulness. A person or thing surviving from an earlier time, especially someone surviving in office or remaining on a sports team. ‘But in reality, Daylight Savings Time is an archaic holdover ...


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I don’t know about its currency in discourse outside the field of Information Technology, but it’s quite common within the field to refer to code or programs that fit your definition as “legacy” code. If someone were to refer to “hands” (as used for measuring the height of a horse) as a “legacy unit”, I would ...


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Not sure what the context is or which words would fit best, but here are a few which come to mind: Tradition Practice Etiquette Custom Precedented Convention Mores (pronounced more-ays)


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Vestigial seems to be precisely the concept you are going for. The noun form of vestigial is vestige, but it accentuates the meaning you impute worse than vestigal does and it does not fit your example sentence's phrasing. We have many measurements of elbow diameter not because it is particularly useful, but for historical reasons. The measurements are a ...


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A google search for Photoshop synonyms yields photo-edit. It's a verb.


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Depending on what you did, you can use retouch. retouch (Cambridge) verb [ T ] to make small changes to a picture, photograph, etc., especially in order to improve it:


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You can talk about manipulating an image, and Adobe will thank you for doing so,


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Etymonline has this for the word yes: yes (adv.) Old English gise, gese "so be it!," probably from gea, ge "so" (see yea) + si "be it!," from Proto-Germanic *sijai-, from PIE *si-, optative stem of root *es- "to be." Originally stronger than simple yea. Used in Shakespeare mainly as an answer to negative questions.... For what it's worth, yea is ...


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"Presential" if it means that happen in the presence of or it is an actual presence. You can have a face-to-face interview on video, or a presential interview. We work with presential or remote clients.


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