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1

As people have said in the comments, your question is probably linked to the development of do-support in English. The topic is complicated and is still being researched. Here is an example of what people have said about its development in Middle English: We show that the patterns in the development of do-support in imperatives as well as in questions ...


8

This seems to be an American English vs British English issue. Here are the results of searching for these phrases in the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA, 560 million words) and the British National Corpus (BNC, 100 million words). The percentages are the out of the total number of hits for all three phrasings in that corpus, i.e. 193/(193+840+...


0

Another difference between "no kidding" and "not kidding" is that "no kidding" can be used as an interrogative. Speaker A I just won a million dollars! Speaker B No kidding? Speaker A I'm not kidding!


-1

If we see both phrases one by one ``No kidding '' >like a teachers is teaching in a class, and ordering the student. That no kidding in a class. . While in the second situation 'Not kidding'' Ram explained to Rama that is not kidding. (means he just explaining the situation,)


-2

There are three forms of the present tense: simple (I support), emphatic (I do support), progressive (I am supporting). The very definition of emphatic present tense is that it has three uses: 1. For emphasis 2. For negatives 3. For questions. Look up "emphatic present tense" and you can read about this. This is one such webpage: http://englishplus.com/...


0

If you do put a non- in front of a compound adjective, you should use two hyphens (or more, if needed): in your example, it should be non-finitely-generated groups. But should you put non- in front of a compound adjective in the first place? This really depends on the example. Adding non- in front of a compound adjective can make it ambiguous; I would ...


-1

Agree can be either used as an intransitive or transitive verb, so adverb comes after the verb. I fought bravely I ran quickly For transitive verb, it comes after the indirect object. I do not agree with him totally.


2

The habitual use of ain't no longer occurs in standard Englishes and its use in other varieties is stigmatised by some [misguided souls] as being indicative of lower social status and a lack of education. The history of ain't is interesting as the proscription against it appears, much like the proscription against the perceived phenomenon of so-called h-...


-2

I think Mr Ashworth above has just answered your question. And yes, it is compulsory to add "no" to "ain't". This is called a double negative (as mentioned above as well). Don't use this phrase in polite company. It's substandard. Use it with your friends only.


0

John is more mad than Bob is. It would be difficult to find a man more brave than he is. Why do we have the sentence terminating with an is? As I learned in school, we would put the is before the noun, or omit it completely John is more mad than is Bob. or John is more mad than Bob. It would be difficult to find a man more brave than he.


0

Oversleeping is no more healthy than overeating. . This camera is no more big than my hands. In native English, these two sentences are incredibly uncomfortable, in a word they are wrong. (The fact that they may or may not be grammatically correct is a naive path of enquiry. This sentence not not the other not not sentence is 'grammatically correct', ...


6

Ain't and "double negatives" (using no, none, nowhere etc with not) are both features of many non-standard varieties of English, all over the world. Neither of them is used in any standard English; in the non-standard Englishes where they are used, they are often used together, but they can be used separately, as Michael Harvey says in a comment.


1

I think the construction "X is no more A than Y" normally functions idiomatically to express "X is not A." You are saying some predicate does not apply in this case, just as it doesn't apply in this other case. The tacit part of the expression is "...Y is A." See below: "Oversleeping is no more healthy than overeating (is healthy)." "This camera is ...


20

Quirk, Greenbaum, Leech and Svartvik have the following in their A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (pp. 462-463): Most adjectives that are inflected for their comparison can also take the periphrastic forms with more and most. With more, they seem to do so more easily when they are predicative and are followed by a than-clause: John ...


14

Instead of using more to form comparatives, notice what happens when you use inflection for the comparative degree: Oversleeping is no healthier than overeating. The camera is no bigger than my hands. More big is always wrong to form the comparative degree, which is always bigger . More healthy could also be healthier but it does not necessarily need ...


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