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1 vote

Are there any idioms/expressions that communicate the idea of a sort of circular journey, as in this T.S. Eliot quote?

“To be whole is to be part. True voyage is return.” Ursula K. Leguin The words are attributed to Odo the Philosopher in The Dispossessed, part of Leguin’s Hainish Cycle. The second sentence captures ...
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0 votes

A word for a state that changes regularly and consistently

The system exhibits periodic behaviour. If you can edit your question to elaborate on the specific example you're trying to describe, you may get better answers.
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1 vote

A word for a state that changes regularly and consistently

"Like clockwork" seems like a good fit. According to Oxford Learner's, it's an idiom meaning: go/run like clockwork ​to happen according to plan; to happen without difficulties or problems ...
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1 vote

A word for a state that changes regularly and consistently

I would say that this behavior is "cyclic". In this case, the cycle only has 2 states - on, off, on, off, .... Other cyclic behaviors can have more states, such as the seasons (spring, ...
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5 votes

A word for a state that changes regularly and consistently

Intermittent is the usual word for a connection which is expected to be only available some of the time
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8 votes

A word for a state that changes regularly and consistently

If it was a continuous value I would suggest oscillate, but on and off seem discrete, so I might suggest switch but that has another meaning in networks. I considered fluctuate, but that connotes ...
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0 votes

A word for a state that changes regularly and consistently

The best term I can think of is "dynamic". a dynamic network connection (OALD) dynamic adjective 2 (of a process, relationship or system) always changing and making progress
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1 vote

What is the native word for describing an expression or gesture

The facial expression is a pout, and the verb for displaying this expression is to pout. Merriam-Webster: 1a: to show displeasure by thrusting out the lips or wearing a sullen expression a pouting ...
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2 votes

need a short idiom/phrase or word for two people/things that are complete opposites

Chalk and cheese. When using the idiom “chalk and cheese,” you’re referring to two items, tasks, people, or ideologies that are entirely different from one another. The phrase still has a use today, ...
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0 votes

need a short idiom/phrase or word for two people/things that are complete opposites

antipodal: The events of summer intertwine the stories of (two) antipodal drug dealers. MW: 1: of or relating to the antipodes specifically : situated at the opposite side of the earth or moon an ...
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1 vote

What is the phrase or expression which has the word ‘finger’ in it and means very easily or quickly

"like snapping your fingers" or "at the snap of a finger" or other constructions that refer to snapping fingers, also this. This conveys the idea that it is easy and basically ...
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11 votes

What is the phrase or expression which has the word ‘finger’ in it and means very easily or quickly

How about: Long ago the Internet was not at everybody’s fingertips. It’s slightly awkward in this example sentence — it works better when the active agent is more explicit (e.g. “When I was a kid, we ...
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7 votes

What is the phrase or expression which has the word ‘finger’ in it and means very easily or quickly

There is a possibility of using a fixed expression that has "fingers" in it, but it would probably be better to use it in the present case as introduced by another fixed expression ("...
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-1 votes

Is describing someone as “higher-educated” awkward?

I don't think you say this about yourself, but when you promote someone else.
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-2 votes

More concise word of phrase for "to turn into a process"

Processtize is a useful verb. To me, it’s more intuitive than Processize. If you rework the sentence, the suggestion above to “Routinize a an unstructured process” is a good one.
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1 vote

need an idiom or phrase that means that the same event resulted (or results) in contrasting outcomes for 2 different inividuals

With respect, you are making heavy weather of something that is simple in principle. The idea you wish to convey is that one event set the two lifeguards on different courses. It's a turning point ...
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1 vote

Looking for idiom or phrase similar to "for dummies"

for the layman / in layman's terms or break it down [for me] Examples: Who can explain [technical term] in layman's terms? Yes, that's the technical definition, good. Can you also break it down for ...
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0 votes

Looking for idiom or phrase similar to "for dummies"

English 101 could work: 101 is more common in AmE than BrE but it is understood in both. 101 (slang) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 101 (pronounced ONE-oh-ONE) is a slang term for the most ...
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0 votes

Looking for idiom or phrase similar to "for dummies"

You could say in words of one syllable from Farlex In simple terms that are easy to understand. (Usually implying that the listener is unintelligent.) I don't understand financial derivatives—can ...
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0 votes

Taking no action is easier than taking some action

At least five possibilities come to mind. Whether they fit your specification exactly or not depends on context or circumstance. If you do not wish to interfere with the course of events, you may ...
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1 vote

Taking no action is easier than taking some action

Take the path of least resistance. It even has its own Wikipedia page! The physical or metaphorical pathway that provides the least resistance to forward motion by a given object or entity, among a ...
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0 votes

need an idiom or phrase that means "you're up early"

I hereby submit four possible suggestions for an alternate wording. Note that the square brackets in the fourth suggestion means optional and the "<->" squiggle means choose either. I ...
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3 votes

need an idiom or phrase that means "you're up early"

up with the lark in British English up early in the morning Bright and early very early in the morning He was up bright and early, keen to get started.
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1 vote

What's it called when you lose contact with reality when watching a movie?

Transported [to another time / place] From Cambridge Dictionary: If something transports you to a different time or place, it makes you feel as if you were in it: The film transports you back to the ...
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3 votes

need an idiom or phrase that means "you're up early"

You could try "you're an early bird", which would be derived from the common aphorism "The early bird catches the worm".
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2 votes

What do you call a flat with a small yard with no roof?

Are you looking for a garden flat? From Lexico: garden flat noun A basement or ground floor flat which opens on to a garden. Examples of a garden flat: (Source) (Source) The flat opens to or has ...
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0 votes

Is there a term for computer users who prefer keyboard shortcuts over a mouse?

I know not an exact match but perhaps you could say “command-line user” as opposed to “GUI user”. I know that the OP is asking about hot keys etc, but the people who use them are same people who are ...
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0 votes

Idiom for gift or gesture that isn't good enough

pandering often has a connotation that what is given is woefully short of that which is necessary. One would, in a lazy attempt to placate others, pander to their constituents by providing or ...
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0 votes

Idiom for gift or gesture that isn't good enough

Smoke and mirrors Merriam-Webster: Something intended to disguise or draw attention away from an often embarrassing or unpleasant issue Example: The recent school budget increase is just smoke and ...
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0 votes

Requesting someone to perform a task without sounding pushy

The key is to use "I-messages." This means that you talk about you. You explain what you need and why. Example, taken from a portal message I sent to my primary today: Drug X has been ...
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2 votes

Idiom for gift or gesture that isn't good enough

Token. Tokenism. If you refer to an action as tokenism, you disapprove of it because you think it is just done for effect, in order to show a particular intention or to impress a particular type of ...
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0 votes

Idiom for gift or gesture that isn't good enough

throw (someone) a bone (idiom) Informal To offer (someone) something that is not very important or valuable especially to stop complaints or protests The boss would not let his workers out early for ...
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1 vote

Idiom for gift or gesture that isn't good enough

The expression window dressing may fit in the context you are describing: things that are of no real importance and are said or done in order to make an attractive effect: How many of the candidate'...
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2 votes
Accepted

Is there an equivalent to the assertive/polite expression "je me permets de ..." in English?

Je me permets de vous rappeler que la date limite est le 19 novembre. This carries the assertive strength of If I may/could/might (in order of assertiveness) remind you that … (I assume the ...
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1 vote

Is there an equivalent to the assertive/polite expression "je me permets de ..." in English?

The French represents a kind of understatement. It sounds polite, but is really there to convey the speaker's sense of superiority. The nearest English equivalent is I take the liberty of... The ...
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0 votes

Is there an equivalent to the assertive/polite expression "je me permets de ..." in English?

If we take a typical use of this expression, it appears that there are three main renderings. I would like to May I Let me Je me permet de (vous faire remarquer que …) [I would like to]/[May I]/[Let ...
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-1 votes

A word or phrase for a non-military attack on a country's home soil

GUERILLA WARFARE is usually what asymmetric war refers to. Usually a smaller force that is not a military, sometimes a revolutionary or terrorist force. As such they use ambushes, hiding, often ...
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1 vote

I need a word whose meaning is somewhere on the spectrum between 'too scared' and 'too dumb'. Or a phrase/idiom

"Bart, we’re literally here buying you drugs cus you’re too chicken to buy your own high" From Urban Dictionary, which for once, provides a decent definition too chicken When someone is ...
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0 votes

I need a word whose meaning is somewhere on the spectrum between 'too scared' and 'too dumb'. Or a phrase/idiom

pathetic (Lexico.com) Arousing pity, especially through vulnerability or sadness Miserably inadequate; of very low standard ...where in practice, that "vulnerability" is often fearfulness, ...
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0 votes

I need a word whose meaning is somewhere on the spectrum between 'too scared' and 'too dumb'. Or a phrase/idiom

"panicky" may fit the bill, as it implies unreasoning and overpowering fear, making one unable to act astutely in an emergency. panicky - "thrown into a state of intense fear or ...
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0 votes

Formal salutation of a servant to a child?

They say it is minor as 'Minor will you please' as (sir your power are)? but most refences are tender and the control of a union or marriage. The minor power of the world. It is where the WILL, WANT ...
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0 votes

Formal salutation of a servant to a child?

Master was a jest to display parenthood and abuse the child in plain sight because tender and being able defeated the elderly but the need to be cared for was evident if you research common scenes you ...
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3 votes
Accepted

What is the proper term for a "physical event"?

The expression is in person: by meeting with someone rather than talking on the phone, e-mailing, or writing to the person. You must apply for the license in person. in-person (adjective) ...
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1 vote

What is the expression for stating that it isn't for us to say something?

Whatever its formulation, it's a common expression. Is it for us to say . . .? Nor is it for us to say . . . These are the results from Google NGram "not for * to say" not for me to say ...
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3 votes
Accepted

What would you call a specialised object unique to a person?

TV tropes calls it an Iconic Item. Within the text they also use "signature item", which I feel may be an even better fit: Early in [The Fourth Doctor's] run the production team had ...
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0 votes

What is a literal rephrasing of "that builds on our foundation of"?

There's a classic mixed metaphor: [a new journey] [building on a foundation]. Separately, each metaphor works very well, but they clash when placed together. But I'm not sure that rendering one ...
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-1 votes
Accepted

What is a literal rephrasing of "that builds on our foundation of"?

IMO it does not sound good, but is intended to sound important; "relentless innovation" isn't "foundation" to me, but suggests shifting sand. I would prefer tradition to '...
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