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2

"Move to the front burner" is actually an expression too, understood to be the opposite of putting something on the "back burner." Other possibilities: Move to the front of the line or top of the list Make it a priority Take up from the table (an actual parliamentary procedure, after something has been "tabled") Make Job 1 (assign top importance to) ...


3

One word that fits well in that sentence would be invaluable. "The one trait that makes him invaluable is his tenacity..." Its literal meaning is that something is so good that it is impossible to place a value upon it.


0

Excel? "The one trait that makes him excel is tenacity; he never gives up on a problem, and employs all his resources to solve it." Dictionary.com: to surpass others or be superior in some respect or area This not only emphasises the singularity of the trait, it also makes that person stand out from the throng.


1

Telemetry is remote measurement. It's opposite is direct measurement. For example, in medicine a telemetry floor is where patients are placed on a remote cardiac monitor. They can wander freely around without wires. In a directly measured setting, they'd be wired to the cardiac monitor.


2

I don't think there's an antonym. In the contexts where you would use "telemetry", any measurement that isn't specifically indicated to be remote would be assumed to be local, so you'd just say "measurement" or "metric". For example, if an astronaut's spacesuit has a readout of their vital statistics, when the astronaut looks at it, it would be his metrics, ...


0

I think this is a very pertinent question since telemetry is such a buzzword these days in the telecommunications industry. I think the opposite has to indicate measurements are taken locally ... e.g. "local measurements" but it really depends what local vs remote means in your context . I guess often it is whether done on same or different computer, but ...


1

Normal color vision is the term generally used. I have deuteranopia, a common type of red-green color blindness. As such, I've done a fair bit of reading on the subject and that's the term used. If you're interested, here's some samples showing how I see the world.


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If I understand what you're saying, the person you're describing is a dispassionate atheist. You cannot truly call this person neutral or ambivalent. They have an opinion, they just lack the ardor of a zealot on the subject. They're not burdened with strong emotions on the subject and therefore are able to have calm rational discussions about it. In ...


0

A fence-sitter or to be on the fence perhaps. Disinterested ( not 'uninterested', I know the difference)


1

Ambivalent seems to fit your requirement. It's not a religion-specific word, but so much the better for that; it's important to get as much mileage out of every word as possible.


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