New answers tagged

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This is a saying that I have met earlier in my life but now rarely. I can find no authority for my answer but here it is anyway. When embarking on some risky activity, one might say “The top won’t come off”, making the metaphor of driving a soft-top convertible car fast. There is some recognised risk, but it is not great, and even if the event happens it ...


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a rented house a confused/bored child Your mistake is in assuming that "rented" is an adjective here. It isn't; it's a verb. Compare "rented" to "confused" and "bored" [1] "Rented" can't be modified by "very", but "confused/bored" can: we can say "a very confused/bored child", ...


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I'd suggest Zeitgeist, a German word, meaning spirit of the age. the defining spirit or mood of a particular period of history as shown by the ideas and beliefs of the time. "the story captured the zeitgeist of the late 1960s" M-W . Here's a more extensive treatment from Wikipedia: The zeitgeist (German pronunciation /ˈtsaɪtɡaɪst/ ) is a ...


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According to the opening of the guidelines, you should use COVID-19 to refer to the disease, and SARS-CoV-2 to refer to the virus. In a formal paper I would establish these terms at the beginning. I would not expect readers of a formal paper to be confused between the 2003 SARS and the new disease.


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I think that the answer to this has to do with what the abbreviations stand for. Covid-19 means corona + virus + disease + 2019.


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In seeking to identify the original perceived need for the word coequal in English, I decided to focus on the context in which it tended to appear in its early days of written usage. That context was primarily religious discussion. Early print instances of 'coequal' or 'coequall' Searches for coequal and coequall in the Early English Books Online database ...


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When I was a teenager, I fell head over heels with/for this Italian guy. I was so in love that I spent all my money on a ticket to Rome To fall head over heels (in love) with or for someone is a common-day English expression which Merriam-Webster says is also an adverb. It means to be so much in love that you are prepared to do crazy things such as spending ...


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What is probably asked is a collocative combination. "to fall madly for" is a common one. (ref)


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It's my understanding that edible = of a type suitable for eating. Eatable = in a state fit for eating.


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Buzzword = a word or expression from a particular subject area that has become fashionable by being used a lot, especially on television and in the newspapers: Cambridge Dictionary Hip = fashionable Buzzword came into use from 1960 onwards. Hip came into use as trendy (fashionable) word for fashionable about the same time. Both words seem a little stale now, ...


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It's from Copy here are some definitions To make a copy or copies of; to write; print, engrave, or paint after an original; to duplicate; to reproduce; to transcribe; as, to copy a manuscript, inscription, design, painting, etc.; -- often with out, sometimes with off. To imitate; to attempt to resemble, as in manners or course of life. Source : Copying ...


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Goldbricking the practice of doing less work than one is able to, while maintaining the appearance of working It refers to a con of putting a layer of gold on a brick. The person himself is a goldbricker as a consequence.


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They may be "swinging the lead". The phrase probably derives from a past past technique of lowering a lead weight on a line from a ship to determine the depth of water. Some lazy sailors would do it slowly, badly or for too long so as to appear busy without actually doing very much.


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Prudential is more often used to refer to what people do rather than people themselves: "A person is prudent if he has prudential motives." These words are derived from a Latin term meaning "to look after," "to provide for." Prudent is employed to mean "wise," "cautious," "practical," "careful ...


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