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You’ve already found your synonym (all at once), and the OED has your back. It even uses in one go to define it: all, adj., pron., and n., adv., and conj. PHRASES P18. a. all at once. (a) With everything happening in one go or simultaneously; at one and the same time; all together. Source: Oxford English Dictionary (login required) Here are some selected ...


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You could say 'at one fell swoop'. Bit of a cliché, though, and you should avoid clichés like the plague.


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You could use at a [single] stroke etc: at one stroke {also, at one blow; at a stroke or blow; in one stroke or blow} At the same time, with one forceful or quick action. [The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.] Although usually used metaphorically nowadays, literal examples do exist: Somerset is said to have gone straight up to ...


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I suggest (from Lexico) attempt NOUN An effort to achieve or complete a difficult task or action. The question mentions 'formal' and 'academia' so I presume it's not entirely about cookery, though I could offer Jan flipped the pancake at the first attempt.


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"with one whack" comes to mind. "I wanted to crush all the pepper with one whack, so I used a bigger tool." a smart or resounding blow MW a sharp, swift blow TFD ...tried to split the log with one whack. ...and killed the snake with one whack.


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I wanted to crush all the pepper in one batch, so I used a bigger tool and crushed all of it at once. batch (n.) The quantity of material prepared or required for one operation m-w I've changed them to it, since you refer to pepper. If you are talking about black pepper, you could also say: I wanted to crush all the pepper corns in one batch, so I used a ...


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Cambridge Dictionary [adjusted] first lists the default stipulative meaning of the word: absenteeism [noun] [non-count]: a situation in which people are not at school or work when they should be but then goes on (in the 'Cambridge Business English Dictionary' reference) to allow the logical, caveat-lacking definition as well as the default sense: ...


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In Southern Nigeria, the word 'palaver' is used quite often; although with a very distinct Nigerian pronunciation and in the context of local colloquialisms. In Nigeria (where many old english words float around as vestiges from the former British Empire), 'palaver' means an argument or a situational problem. It is often used in phrases such as, "what'...


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