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Pea-stick a long stake or branch upon which garden peas are trained https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pea-stick


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None of the given statements correspond rightly to the crux of the matter to be articulated. You could simply say: I no longer use that number.


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You can also say; "I'm not using that number anymore" ----it is active but in the present tense or "I changed number" ----it is active but in past tense or "I changed my telecom service"


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I have often found myself in situations where I've felt the dire need of a word that describes this leaf-like motion. The words sway and oscillate are synonymous to words which describe a motion which can be predefined, or carries itself in a steady, predictive way. A typical example of sway that many poets use is for branches, which sway back and forth ...


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In that sentence, they are pretty much interchangeable. They're both short and colloquial and immediately ignorable. That's what such verbs are for. The reasons why they both work are different, though, and are limited to this sentence. That's what's the problem with asking about individual sentences; the answers don't generalize, even though everybody wants ...


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The difference is slight and mainly in register, with put slightly more specific and formal. Both meanings are well-documented in the Merriam-Webster dictionary. Put means to place something (Merriam-Webster, meaning 1) and get means to cause to be in that place (Merriam-Webster, meaning 5c). Put feels more direct than get. Imagine someone reading the ...


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Language isn't math. A words meaning doesn't start from someone deciding on a meaning out of thin air and assigning a word to it that must always exactly and without exception be followed or things break. Dictionary entries are -attempts- at capturing what a word means. There's no standard All that said, some dictionaries are more respected than others. ...


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Out of the three, I usually refer MW, as it's been around since 1828. But that's not to mean that using other dictionaries is inutile. Vocabulary.com has one of the best ways of defining words, but for some words, it can stray away from the acceptation. In a nutshell, to completely understand a word, its synonyms, and usage, I'd recommend using MW, ...


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"versatile" seems like what you're looking for. from Collins, adjective, definition 2 "A tool, machine, or material that is versatile can be used for many different purposes. e.g. Never before has computing been so versatile."


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I think the word you may be looking for is intuitive. From Oxford: Using or based on what one feels to be true even without conscious reasoning; instinctive. I had an intuitive conviction that there was something unsound in him


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To be a shell is to have no soul, no character, and to live only for the approval of others. You "Keep burning bridges while you're buying your new friends" Breaking real friendships, and buying popularity, but there is no substance. "A day of reflection hits, you're a shell" Is all the fame and popularity... "Is it worth your soul?"


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Mistake is fine, but typographical error. might be better: a mistake (such as a misspelled word) in typed or printed text This makes it clear that it's likely a mistake as a result of writing the information down, rather than with methodology, or logic, or something else.


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Based on the popular "you are my sunshine" to mean "you light up my life/make me feel happy and warm," by extension I guess it means "My environment is based on your demeanor." Compare: "Happy wife, happy life."


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You should use the past simple here, 'who wrote this and put it into my locker!' because it's a completed action in the past, and it's happening in sequence. Like: 'I went to the shops and then I returned to the party and I danced all night...' Lots of people struggle with the difference between the past simple and the past perfect. You can find a really ...


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