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6

Going into detail on other languages is beyond the scope of this site, but, it's not just English. You can use the term "lexical stress" to look up examples of languages where two words can differ in stress and nothing else: many languages with lexical stress have stress patterns based on how a word is put together. Other examples are Russian, ...


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Note the capitalisation of God/god. I'm neither a man nor a god- man is a countable common noun; god is a countable common noun. I'm neither man nor God - man is an uncountable common noun designating a class of object; God is an uncountable proper noun, i.e. a name. I'm neither a man nor God - man is a countable common noun; God is an uncountable proper ...


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Lawyers generally call this sort of judging result-oriented or result-driven. More cynical lawyers call it judging.


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let's say I say, "we should probably take a more holistic approach, I think it'll give us a lot of new ideas." A statement that describes an excellent proposition but is flawed only on the grounds of practicality is often known as “a counsel of perfection”. A counsel of perfection is an ironic adaptation of a mediaeval theological idea of some ...


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In some circumstances we would say that mention was made merely for completeness or for the sake of completeness Completeness = the quality of being whole or perfect and having nothing missing: ”For the sake of completeness, I should also mention two other minor developments.” Cambridge This Cambridge dictionary entry has relevant definition and example. ...


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As a native English speaker of Polynesian heritage, I definitely understand how the confusion arises, and I still choose to use the word “stay” instead of “live.” In my case, the Samoan “nofo” is the catalyst for my choice, because “ola” or “live,” for me, means exactly that: “to exist.” So I am forcing a distinction into English conversation, which ...


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Ring-a-ding originated as onomatopoeia mimicking the sound of bells 1740 Gypsy Laddie in F. J. Child Engish & Scottish Popular Ballads (1890) vii Ring a ding a ding go ding go da, Ring a ding a ding go da dy. It was first recorded as an adjective by the OED in 1960 ring-a-ding C. adj. Excellent, remarkable. Also: mad, frenetic. 1960 Times 11 Nov. ...


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While this isn't an origin answer, it is a variation that I haven't seen anywhere else (yet). My grandparents (from the Chicago area) used to say that someone was "talking through their hat to hear their hair whistle". The basic meaning was the same: the individual didn't know what they were talking about and/or liked to hear the sound of their ...


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Ok, prepare to be dazzled: When there's a single link, it's better to use "at the link above" because, exactly there, you'll find what you are looking for. When there are multiple links and some might contain what you are looking for, maybe using "(with)in the links above" is a better choice. It's less specific than the previous case. ...


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Frank Sinatra recorded a song called Ring-A-Ding-Ding in 1961. (It was also the title of the album on which it appeared.) But Sinatra appears to have used the term several years earlier in the 1956 movie The Tender Trap. According to an article in the Cedar Rapids Gazette (October 10, 1956, p15) the comedian Jack E. Leonard "has been saying 'ring-a-d-...


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I'm from California and how I personally say the words is can is pronounced the same as the name Ken whereas can't is pronounced like how most people say can and the "t" isn't pronounced.


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Is it correct to say What makes her flatmate happy? or What did make her flatmate happy?


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As a kid I would use the word mad when I was disturbed. As an adult I've moved towards using it more for mental state; insane.


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Lived is just fine. Lived out is used more appropriately when the end of a person's life is in view. He lived out (the final years of) his life in quiet retirement. Lived out could also be used in place of to do or to experience, as in He has finally had the chance to live out his dreams/fantasies.


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In much of the U.S., /u:/ and /ju:/ have merged after /t/, /d/, and /n/. That means if you pronounce noon as /nju:n/, people will still understand you, and probably won't even notice you're pronouncing it differently than they do. I don't know if I've heard people use /ju:/ after /n/, but I've definitely heard it after /d/ and /t/. This is generally called ...


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I was taught to pronounce the oo in either afternoon or noon as the oo in nook That was poor teaching - it is wrong. Standard pronunciation: noon, n.Brit. /nuːn/; U.S. /nun/; moon, n.Brit. /muːn/; U.S. /mun/ nook, n. Brit. /nʊk/, U.S. /nʊk/ (some dialects pronounce as /nuːk/ particularly parts of Scotland - but this is non-standard.) until I found native ...


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To add to Xanne's answer, sometimes it is simply called "security": Do not take a pair of millstones or even an upper millstone as security for a debt, because that would be taking one's livelihood as security. (Bible, Deuteronomy, laws of social responsibility, CSB) Or "a pledge": If you ever take your neighbor's cloak as a pledge, ...


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A security deposit. https://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/security-deposit.asp A security deposit for renting an apartment is returned if the apartment is in good condition when you vacate it. A security deposit for renting a bike or a boat ensures that you’ll return the rented item to get the deposit back. Sometimes a credit card is used with the agreement ...


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Collateral (n) property (such as securities) pledged by a borrower to protect the interests of the lender


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The proper expression would be „buttock enhancement“, as in „Have you ever undergone buttock enhancement?“, or „have you had buttock enhancement lately?“


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Did you mean: A) will have been B) will be In this case the correct answer is B. "Will have been" is used when the instance occurs before a certain date in the future. For example: "By 2050, our cars will have been replaced with spaceships." "Will be" is used when the instance occurs at an exact date in the future. For example: "Our cars will be replaced ...


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