Skip to main content

New answers tagged

0 votes

Word or idiom to describe clothes colours that don't match

Depending on the colour scheme, you could say "Um, no sorry, it looks very gaudy, and so does your house paintjob, incidentally" You wouldn't use gaudy for mismatched outfits that don't work ...
Tracy Smith's user avatar
4 votes

Word or idiom to describe clothes colours that don't match

Anglophones say the colours clash if they're not compatible. And if someone says, for example... "Your shirt clashes with your jacket" ...that almost always specifically means the colours ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
0 votes

Word or idiom to describe clothes colours that don't match

jar (with something) comes to mind. Per OLD: to be different from something in a strange or unpleasant way Her brown shoes jarred with the rest of the outfit.
user405662's user avatar
  • 10.3k
2 votes
Accepted

Word or idiom to describe clothes colours that don't match

There is a hypernym (and it is, like the Arabic term, a rhyme-based irreversible binomial†) that would fit: hotch-potch [singular noun] [British]; in US use 'hodgepodge' A hotch-potch is an untidy ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
1 vote

Synonym for "of my production"

There are many ways as suggested in the comments. I thought of "Home-produced honey" and searching Google images with that phrase yields Home-produced honey Home-grown honey (not sure about ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
  • 103k
3 votes

Is there a similar expression to "pearl clutching" without the gender implications

Hand-wringing is what you are probably looking for! Merriam Webster hand-wringing noun and adjective - : an overwrought expression of concern or guilt Please, no more contrived hand-wringing and ...
Alex's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes

Is there a better word for 'anonymity' here?

The idea of a city as providing anonymity is a common one, so that's probably as good a word as any. Some examples follow. In 2017, the BBC quoted Peter Swire, professor of law and ethics at Georgia ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 10.5k
0 votes

Is there a better word for 'anonymity' here?

You could say The Festival was the reason he had chosen this place to enter the country, the safety and blending in it provided would make his further travels much smoother. Blend in means to look ...
fev's user avatar
  • 34.5k
0 votes

Is there a better word for 'anonymity' here?

Now that the poster has made allowance for phrases as well (previously it's only SWR), I propose lost in the shuffle. Failing to stand out among others. This metaphoric term alludes to mixing playing ...
user405662's user avatar
  • 10.3k
0 votes

Is there a better word for 'anonymity' here?

Untraceability or untrackability seems appropriate, but it unwieldy. Rewording slightly: The Festival was the reason he had chosen this place to enter the country, the increased number of foreigners ...
import random's user avatar
1 vote

Is there a better word for 'anonymity' here?

Hospitality may be the word you’re looking for. The natives or locals welcome outsiders, whom they recognize. Thus, outsiders are not in fact anonymous. See https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenia_(...
Xanne's user avatar
  • 15.5k
6 votes

Idiomatic expressions for making sarcastic comparisons with other person: translations for ‘otra que’ or ‘ser un poroto’

In addition to the constructions offered in the comments, we can use move over in the imperative in a similar jocular or ironic way. move over (v.) To make room, give way; (colloquial) to yield to ...
DjinTonic's user avatar
  • 22.1k
0 votes

What is an idiom for overcoming a life obstacle?

Be like a river and find your path over, under, around, or through; to always keep trying and never stop flowing.
fern's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
Accepted

A word or phrase that means "picky about something they can't have"

The classic sour grapes fits the bill. disparagement of something that has proven unattainable His criticisms are just sour grapes. [Merriam-Webster] So you could say Mikes's criticisms/nitpicks are ...
user405662's user avatar
  • 10.3k
2 votes

What do you call a moderate victory?

A modest victory. modest [adjective]: ... [2: of an amount, rate, or level] relatively moderate, limited, or small. [ODE, courtesy of Google] modest [adjective] [1: as in average] being about ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
2 votes

What do you call a moderate victory?

An unconvincing victory - a victory that is unsatisfactory in that it does not persuade anyone that the winner deserved that victory.
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 43.4k
1 vote

Is there a idiom/phrase to describe addressing a problem that doesn't actually occur or exist?

Another term is Borrowing trouble that is, to worry about or work on solutions for problems that are not yet yours.
Elliot's user avatar
  • 5,482
1 vote

Is there a idiom/phrase to describe addressing a problem that doesn't actually occur or exist?

Tilting at windmills, reference from Don Quixote. Wikipedia gives this explanation of the idiomatic expression from the literature: Tilting at windmills is an English idiom that means "attacking ...
Moo's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes

Idiom for a situation where a problem has two simultaneous but unrelated causes?

Specifically for engineering I might describe this as a corner case: a corner case ... involves a problem or situation that occurs only outside normal operating parameters — specifically one that ...
detly's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote

Idiom for a situation where a problem has two simultaneous but unrelated causes?

There are a handful of programming jargon terms for various bug situations, and the one you describe nearly fits under the definition of a mandelbug. From Wikipedia: A mandelbug (named after Benoît ...
Ben Jensen's user avatar
2 votes

Idiom for a situation where a problem has two simultaneous but unrelated causes?

In engineering, the standard terminology for this (which is called out in the ISO-26262 standard) is Multiple-point fault A multiple-point fault can then, under the right (or wrong!) circumstances, ...
Graham's user avatar
  • 1,666
0 votes

I'm looking for a term, word or phase used to describe the important, but minute, details. Something along the lines of, "it's the little things"

The cherry on top is a colloquial way of referring to some small thing that brings a sense of completion or flourish to a larger item, making something good even better (like the cherry on top of an ...
Nuclear Hoagie's user avatar
0 votes

I'm looking for a term, word or phase used to describe the important, but minute, details. Something along the lines of, "it's the little things"

In this unique case, I'm struggling to scrounge up an existing adjective that feels well-suited to your notion of a seemingly trivial detail that serves as a conversely vital factor as part a wider ...
Patches Tagoo's user avatar
3 votes

Idiom for a situation where a problem has two simultaneous but unrelated causes?

Maybe a layered problem In this video, the narrator presents the various issues of the Mark 14 torpedo, which was designed in 1931 and by the end of the war became a reliable weapon. In the meantime ...
Dohn Joe's user avatar
  • 948
4 votes

Idiom for a situation where a problem has two simultaneous but unrelated causes?

You could perhaps call this a perfect storm, which describes a combination of bad events that produces something worse than any one individually. The term describes an unusual meteorological event ...
Nuclear Hoagie's user avatar
1 vote

Idiom for a situation where a problem has two simultaneous but unrelated causes?

If there was one true issue and multiple things you thought could be the issue but weren't, then you have one root cause... The fundamental reason for the occurrence of a problem ...and one (or more)...
Wolfie's user avatar
  • 141
20 votes

Idiom for a situation where a problem has two simultaneous but unrelated causes?

Not an idiom, but more generally it's accurate to say that in this case the buggy behavior is overdetermined. According to Oxford: An event is overdetermined if there exist more than one antecedent ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 424
-4 votes

Idiom for a situation where a problem has two simultaneous but unrelated causes?

It seems to me that you ran an uncontrolled experiment (or maybe an out-of-control experiment). A controlled experiment is one in which everything is held constant except for one variable. —ThoughtCo ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 18.1k
11 votes

Idiom for a situation where a problem has two simultaneous but unrelated causes?

I propose that it is a double whammy a situation when two unpleasant things happen at almost the same time Farmers have faced the double whammy of a rising dollar and falling agricultural prices. ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 21.5k

Top 50 recent answers are included