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In this part of the world (just across the ditch!) we would call that person a "tidy Kiwi". As you can guess, it refers to someone who is conscientious about the state they leave places in and makes efforts to minimise their impact. In fact, it's even been used in government-sponsored campaigns on the issue of conservation.


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One phrase is combing an area, from the verb to comb (Merriam-Webster): 3a : to eliminate (as with a comb) by a thorough going-over b : to search or examine systematically // police are combing the city This produces a lot of related terms and phrases. For example, beachcombers are people who comb the beaches looking for specific items, such as ...


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Not completely equivalent as there is no specificity for objects being sought, but there's beachcombing: searching along a shore for objects for resale. Similarly, mudlarking, used in the context of scavenging along a river (e.g. the Thames).


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In AmE, we have the FOD Walk: foreign object damage (redirected from FOD Walk) TFD Rags, pieces of paper, line, articles of clothing, nuts, bolts, or tools that, when misplaced or caught by air currents normally found around aircraft operations (jet blast, rotor or prop wash, engine intake), cause damage to aircraft systems or weapons or injury ...


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Per Wikipedia on Vietnamese Names there is a convention for this. Vietnamese personal names generally consist of three parts: one patrilineal family name, one or more middle name(s) (one of which may be taken from the mother's family name), and one given name, used in that order. The "family name first" order follows the system of Chinese names and is ...


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@Nancy: Interesting, but the correct way to write that Italian word is "paesani", and it doesn't have negative connotations generally. The Italian word for "peasants" is probably "villani", which does have negative connotations. (I'm Italian and Italian is my mother tongue; I know I'm not answering the original question--if not indirectly--but I wanted to ...


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There are many. Not yet mentioned: Wiped him out Cleaned him out Him can be replaced by any object pronoun (her, them, us, you).


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They'd take the shirt of your back. From the free dictionary the shirt off (one's) back Anything or everything one owns or has to offer. Those contractors will take the shirt off your back if you hire them. I mean, I paid them an exorbitant amount of money, and look at the shoddy work they did! I'm not surprised that Tammy loaned you money—she ...


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Cleaned to the bone is one option. Pacific hurricanes usually breakup over the southern Baja California peninsula and then head north up to Phoenix where they have their annual 'monsoon season.' But that year, the hurricane remnants were following the coast of Baja California and ending up in San Diego. The portable AC shelves in both Costco and Home ...


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That phrase reminds me of this one ... bleed (someone or something) dry. To take all of the resources that another person or thing has available. This phrase is often applied to money. Paying for my kids' education is just bleeding me dry. I hope I'll still be able to retire one day! Overhead costs are bleeding our business dry. We need to come ...


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I know I'm answering a question 6 years later. In addition to many of the excellent suggestions above, I'd add: Tunnel vision It means extreme focus on one subject or item to the exclusion of all others.


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I would probably translate it to: Telling it like it is. This is an expression that means being upfront without any pretense. It could also be translated to: Offering my two cents. This means sharing my opinion in a plain manner. I like this as a translation because it retains the sense of words for the money.


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'Calling a spade a spade' already exists in English and appears to have a similar meaning. – Edwin Ashworth


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