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2

There are several terms for this: attributive noun, qualifying noun, noun adjunct, noun modifier. ("Adjectival noun" is an older term for it as well.) It is still a noun—not an adjective or adverb—but it's used to modify another noun an way similar to what adjectives do. An adjective can be used after the noun: The large station / the station is large ...


0

The nouns in your examples are not really used as an adjectives; they are used as nominal modifiers, and those can either be adjectives or nouns. In the latter case there is a grey area with compound nouns. In some grammatical approaches there is a distinction between form (adjective) and function (modifier); different forms can fulfill a particular ...


2

The edge of a hollow container or an opening. Common example: A cup has a lip and it is often also referred to as a rim. In your case, it is the protruding side that moves away from the mesh; so, yes, the mesh side would go up and the side with a void would go down.


2

I THINK it means that the lip (as seen in the second picture)is at the bottom and the clear view of the mesh (third picture) should be at the top. I say this as the membrane filter will need the support of the mesh as seen in the third picture.


0

I think "confectionist" has a nice sound to it! Hopefully, this isn't a word already and just dessert makers have their right to use it! Great question, I was thinking the same thing! Good luck on future questions and endeavors, Another Confectionist.


2

The CGEL introduction to transitivity of verbs begins on p 216 with: Transitivity The default type of internal core complement is an object (O). Whereas all canonical clauses contain an S, they may or may not contain an O, depending on the nature of the verb. This yields the important contrast referred to as transitivity - a transitive clause ...


4

I'm not sure if there's a word describing the physical action of walking over your own footprints to obfuscate them, however, to fill in the blank in your quote: “The boy took a strange path through the trees, circling back to the same spot every so often. I couldn’t tell if it was intentional, an effort to ___________ his tracks, or if he was truly lost” ...


0

First word that came to me was disinterested: I wish I could be more disinterested with materialism ... It is more idiomatic to use disinterested in, but it seems to work well in your context. 2 Having or feeling no interest in something. ‘her father was so disinterested in her progress that he only visited the school once’ Lexico


0

Someone who is highly self-disciplined and avoids all forms of indulgence can be described as (an) ascetic. An ascetic resists desire in all its forms - it effectively describes an existence that is free from acting on want.


0

The control of one's actions suggested by willing oneself to not want is restraint. Accordingly, someone who consistently refused desire would be restrained. Oxford English Dictionary, "restrained, adj.": Kept under control; characterized by reserve or moderation. Merriam-Webster, "Restrained": : marked by restraint : not excessive or extravagant ...


0

The word apathetic, already suggested in a comment, can be traced back to the Greek word for the Stoic ideal that incorporates what you have in mind. It can be used in the present-day English for those who pursue similar ideals, but only if the context prepares the readers/listeners to take it that way, for example, by explicitly referring to Stoicism. ...


0

When I was in high school and worked at a small newspaper distributor, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch indicated editions with star (asterisks). The final edition of the night was the five star "*****".


0

I think the difficulty you have with the given translation is caused more by the translation of 'pflicht' rather than the translation of 'kür'. The Collins Dictionary gives two translations for 'pflicht', the first is duty As you have seen but the second relates specifically to sport and is given as compulsory section Using the second translation '...


1

Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms, revised edition (1984) offers an extended discussion of the similar word pair retrogressive and regressive, both of which it treats as members of a group of synonyms that also includes retrograde and backward. Here is the relevant coverage: backward, retrograde, retrogressive, regressive all involve the idea of ...


0

If I hav really grasped the meaning of the prefixes; re and retro, I will say and use regress to mean moving in the same circular path instead of fresh new path, whereas retrogress would mean moving backwards to a lower or less developed or less efficacious path / state.


-2

I learned that they might be called "states"


7

As Hot Licks says "Edition" is used for this. Here, in today's New York Times see "Late Edition" in the upper right.


1

We'll start off with considering your possible suggestion of alignment. Lexico (from Oxford dictionaries) gives: 1 [mass noun] Arrangement in a straight line or in correct relative positions. ‘the tiles had slipped out of alignment’ 1.1 [count noun] The route or course of a railway or road. ‘four railways, all on different alignments’ ...


2

I have found This book on the net having seen a reference to the term "Contact Patch" in one or two other searches. It seems to me that "contact patch" might be the technical term you are looking for.


10

The most idiomatic and common term would probably be patient. Or if you need something more specific, rehab patient. For example: “In the Wii system, because it's kind of a game format, it does create this kind of inner competitiveness. Even though you may be boxing or playing tennis against some figure on the screen, it's amazing how many of our patients ...


3

How about 'convalescent'? someone who is getting better after a serious illness or injury (source: Cambridge) Or used adjectivally: "For some months I had been ill in health, but was now convalescent, and, with returning strength, found myself in one of those happy moods [..]" E. A. Poe, The Man of the Crowd


-3

Since the government issues the currency, paying some of it back to the issuer in the form of taxes is a return of the money.


-1

Depends on the context, much like "kindered spirit," but: chip off the block great minds think alike cut from the same cloth These may work.


0

Nominals are also called substantives: In English grammar, the term nominal is a category that describes the usage of parts of speech in a sentence. Specifically, the nominal definition is a noun, noun phrase, or any word or word group that functions as a noun. It is also known as a substantive. The term comes from the Latin, meaning "name." ...


1

The most generic term available for this is undefined or not defined, depending on which flows better in speech. Because a definition for undefined gives you something along the lines of not defined, here is the definition for define. I'll be going with the sense in #3 on Merriam-Webster: define verb Characterize; Distinguish you define ...


0

Perhaps, you are looking for unbelonging or unbelongingness. It is the opposite of belongingness defined as: The state or feeling of belonging to a particular group. - Lexico. Here is a relevant excerpt from the book Interrogating Belonging for Young People in Schools (edited by Christine Halse - 2018): Unbelonging can be imposed, for example ...


0

A word which perhaps fits is unclubbable - but unfortunately it does carry a negative sense. Its OED entry reads as follows: Not clubbable; (of a person) not suitable for membership of a club owing to lack of sociability or desire to conform; (of a characteristic) that does not inspire friendly relations; unsociable. ?1764 F. Burney Early ...


0

The concept of a general non-believing group had some light traction as atheism plus. In August 2012, Jennifer McCreight founded a movement known as Atheism Plus that "applies skepticism to everything, including social issues like sexism, racism, politics, poverty, and crime." (The internal quote above is referenced in the above link, but that reference ...


-1

They are technically called onomatopoeia's, see here for a list of examples.


-1

I would like to say that they are not even words, and the more accurate way to represent them would be to call them as "sounds". Because each of these can be classified into one or more categories of the English language. I would also like to agree with Hobbs, who said that they can be called as vocables. However here the thing is vocables are for one ...


0

Onomatopoeia from merriam-webster Definition of onomatopoeia 1: the naming of a thing or action by a vocal imitation of the sound associated with it (such as buzz, hiss)


10

Aren't they interjections? According to the Wikipedia article, this category includes exclamations and hesitation markers as well.


5

filler from Lexico 1.4 A word or sound filling a pause in an utterance or conversation (e.g. er, well, you know) “English speakers tend to fill pauses in our speech with ‘um’ and ‘er,’ but speakers of other languages use different filler sounds.”


8

Linguistically, they can be called vocables: a sound that is used in a particular language, especially one that is not considered a word, for example a sound such as "la" used in music or an exclamation such as "huh" (Cambridge Dictionary). Another word which may be a little bit more recognizable outside of a linguistics context is vocalization/...


10

They are exclamations. Exclamation: a word that expresses sudden pain, surprise, anger, excitement, happiness, or other emotion: "Ouch," "hey," and "wow" are exclamations. (Cambridge Dictionary) Usage: Exclamations (also called interjections) often stand on their own, and in writing they are usually followed by an exclamation mark rather than ...


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