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0 votes

Is the use of the singular “they” formal English or not?

Discretion is the better part of valor. Someone forgot a hat. Make sure to find the owner.
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-2 votes

Is the use of the singular “they” formal English or not?

The following is the best choice: Someone forgot their hat. Use of the possesive pronoun "his" in "someone forgot his hat" is archaic. If the person under discussion question ...
1 vote

What is a formal way to write takes money away from consumers?

This in turn reduces the purchasing power of consumers, therefore forcing them to demand less from businesses.
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0 votes

Usage of "is when"

Bernstein's notion (noted above) that "is when" and "is where" qualify as "juvenile" constructions to be avoided by careful writers and another person's answer pointing ...
4 votes

Why do we take things personally with an adverb but take them easy with an adjective? How can this be justified?

They seem to me to be different constructions. Take it easy is a fixed phrase, an imperative meaning "Relax!" The verb take is required, and the it is required; you hafta have an object, and ...
2 votes

Can I use "to propel sb towards their demise" as a synonym of " to kill"?

The meaning of demise is wider than mere death: Merriam Webster demise: 1a: DEATH b: a cessation of existence or activity c: a loss of position or status 2: the conveyance of an estate 3: transfer of ...
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1 vote

Can I use "to propel sb towards their demise" as a synonym of " to kill"?

Your expression looks far-fetched and awkward. I would recommend the expression cause death, or the adjective fatal: ... therefore even the most minor ailment can easily cause their death/be fatal ...
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