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Fortunate (Oxford Languages) favored by or involving good luck or fortune; lucky. Privileged (Oxford Languages) having special rights, advantages, or immunities. having the rare opportunity to do something that brings particular pleasure.


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Although I would personally use built, if you want something closer to blessed, the most practical word I can think of that still has some of that meaning is favoured (or favored, depending on the regional spelling): 1 : having an appearance or features of a particular kind 2 : endowed with special advantages or gifts Its use in the example sentences ...


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The problem of the word blessedis that it is often used sarcastic for bad behavior in non-religious context: https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=blessed The word "Devices of this type are often blessed with more reliability" sounds contradictory, when you dont give numbers or the relation in what they are reliable. The pun here is also that a non-...


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My question is how natural does that sound to you? It sounds perfectly natural to me. It sounds horribly wrong to my dad. This is a change in English grammar that has been in progress for a while, but is not yet 100% complete. The issue is whether or not conjunctions are transparent to case assignment. If they are, then yeah, a personal pronouns occurring ...


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I think the reason this causes confusion is that children are often corrected without explaining why. For example: a child says “Me and Pete are going to play a game.”  This is wrong, so they they're told to say ‘Pete and I’ instead of ‘Me and Pete’.  However, the child hears that ‘Me and Pete’ is always wrong, and then either overcorrects to “The teacher ...


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I may be in a minority, but when I read "and/or" in an article, even a technical one, I just become suspicious of the logical and verbal abilities of the author.


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'Correct', and 'wrong' are words used to describe speech taught by language teachers and by newspaper copy editors, but they are not very useful for describing how people actually speak and write. Native English speakers and non-native alike are taught things like "Use the nominative 'I' in subject position (and at the end if in a conjunction)." in ...


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Using "me" (or indeed other object pronouns) like this is grammatically incorrect, because a subject pronoun ("I") should be used as subject of the verb. In formal (and probably everyday middle-of-the-road) language, this misuse of object pronouns is to be avoided. You should use "Adam and I", with "I" after the "...


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When speaking, we sometimes say things that aren't grammatically correct, such as the example you shared above. However, in writing, we (at least, those who care about grammar) tend to sound as grammatically correct as possible. So, no, "Me and Adam" in that instance is definitely inaccurate, therefore it sounds unnatural. If you omit "and ...


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As I understand the sentence quoted, I disagree with the author. All the versions are valid and have different meanings. Examples I would have liked to see Australia. When I was younger, to see Australia is what I would have liked. Now that I'm older, it isn't what I would like because I don't like long plane journeys. I would like to have seen Australia. ...


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"To pull in" is an intransitive phrasal verb. You can just say "Pull in!" "To pull into" is transitive, you cannot just say "Pull into!", you must pull into something, e.g. "Pull into that car park!"


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As with most things, it's complex and depends on context and you just don't say it the way you'd expect. If you're asking for pizza at a pizza restaurant (we'll get to tea later), you say: I'd like some pizza to go please. 'To go' is a modifier not exactly of the pizza itself but the order. 'To go' means to package it all up so it is easy to carry to my ...


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There are two separate questions here. The first is whether it is better to ask for 'a takeout tea' or 'a tea to take out'. The answer is that for most ends and and purposes it doesn't really matter; either will be readily understood, and neither will sound strange. If one is in the mood for nitpicking, however, one may argue that a takeout tea is more apt ...


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Do you want to come with Lucy and me? because Lucy and me are the object(s) of the sentence.


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"This is the people" might be appropriate when "people" is referring to a particular ethnic group, religion, etc. (A lot depends on context and the nature of the group.) "These are the people" is generally more idiomatic and would be used to refer to any designated group of people. In your example "people" is not ...


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"This is the people" is very unusual although it appears in the King James version of Bible. EDIT - see comment by @Greybeard Jeremiah 52:28 KJV This is the people whom Nebuchadnezzar carried away captive: in the seventh year three thousand Jews and three and twenty KJV: King James Version In every other circumstance, including your example, you ...


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In school, you refer to your peers by their surnames. You address masters, heads, and such with honorifics. But when they aren't standing right there, you tend to use just the last name for them as well. They properly address you by your last name. Sometimes they might say Miss or Mister or use initials like Weasley,F. Harry addressing Snape as Snape to ...


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If GK Chesterton can do it, you can do it. Yet at the time of Dickens's birth and childhood this weakness in their worldly destiny was in no way apparent; especially it was not apparent to the little Charles himself. He was born and grew up in a paradise of small prosperity. He fell into the family, so to speak, during one of its comfortable periods, and he ...


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"No way" has a long tradition of formality that is recognised as being distinct from current "street talk". The skull shows good development and is in no way artificially deformed from Skeletal Remains Suggesting Or Attributed to Early Man in North America. By Aleš Hrdlička (1907) That was in no way connected with your duty as ...


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Well, "This is in no way representative of ..." probably should merely be "This is not representative of ... " If so, then "in no way" is useless here. For emphasis you could say "This is certainly not representative of ... " Unless there are multiple different possible ways in which "it" could be "...


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