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The expression seems to come from the late 19th/early 19th century when it was "to sing from the same hymnal" The idea was that if two people had different hymnals then they would be of different religions/sects and thus disagree on fundamental [religious] issues. I found this snippet (in a business context) from 1922 in Google Books: Reclamation ...


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I suspect that the term "on the same page" is more Jewish in origin and refers to discussion of the Torah in their religious schools. This is to ensure that their commentaries are referring to the same topis as all Torahs have the same page in any version.


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The whirling vortex (visible because of the dust raised) is sometimes called a dust devil A small whirlwind or air vortex over land, visible as a column of dust and debris. the wind kicked up dust devils in the street From Lexico


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Dictionary.com has the idiom "shoot oneself in the foot" which they define as: Foolishly harm one's own cause, as in He really shot himself in the foot, telling the interviewer all about the others who were applying for the job he wanted. This colloquial term alludes to an accidental shooting as opposed to a deliberate one done so as to avoid ...


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I would suggest the phrase "gild the lily." Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary, as cited by idioms.thefreedictionary.com, offers this definition: Try to improve something which is already perfect, and so spoil it: The dress is perfect. Don’t add anything to it at all. It would just be gilding the lily. This comes from Shakespeare’s play King John. ...


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One phrase (which doesn't really fit the potential duplicate question) is unintended consequences. There are three types of unintended consequences listed in Wikipedia: Unexpected benefit: A positive unexpected benefit (also referred to as luck, serendipity or a windfall). Unexpected drawback: An unexpected detriment occurring in addition to the desired ...


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I'm not sure where the quote came from - it may be Afghan, it may just be the latest group to have it attributed to (see Sven Yargs's reference to South Africa in a book from 2000). For what it's worth, I just read Paul Theroux's 2002 article called The Seizures in Zimbabwe where a white Zimbabwean farmer says: "We have the watches, but Africans have ...


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As in my place in Kuala Lumpur, we understand it this way: Be My Guest related to something that we try to challenge someone to do it with circumstances and difficulty until it's merely seems like will never done or succeed at all. eg: I'm the one who recovered from nightmares, you wanna get into my life? Be My Guest...


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I am not sure it fits exactly what you have in mind, but the story of the Pied Piper is often used as a metaphor for leading people to harm themselves. The story is summarized as follows by Wikipedia: The legend dates back to the Middle Ages, the earliest references describing a piper, dressed in multicolored ("pied") clothing, who was a rat-...


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It's probably a misremembered / simplified version of... The road goes on forever [but the party never ends] ...which has been used as a (primarily, US "country music") album and song title (more than one of each, I think). My above link is to a Reddit discussion about the "meaning", where I'd say this guy has nailed it... ...meaning ...


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The usage comes from rural dairy farmers of UK and Ireland making cheese for themselves from semi-skimmed milk because they sold the cream/butter off to wealthier people to make a living. the semi-skimmed milk cheese was of poorer taste and much harder – therefore, hard cheese! It essentially means something unpleasant or not as lucky as those with money who ...


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Egging someone on addresses the situation where verbal persuasion is used. egg [someone] on [phrasal verb]: to urge or encourage (someone) to do something that is usually foolish or dangerous He continued to take off his clothes while the crowd egged him on. [Merriam-Webster] The girl walked along the top of a narrow uneven wall, seemingly not worried ...


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I'm not sure that there is an established idiom as such. Given the lack of an established form you might need to include a clarification that the hand one has in the act is at at least one remove, so perhaps using a form of He didn't x, he just did Y Where X is the act of self harm and Y is the literal or metaphorical 'assist' so perhaps, riffing off your ...


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An idiom might be to Fall on one's sword fall on (one's) sword To accept the responsibility or blame for a problem or mistake. Likened to the former practice of a soldier using his sword to take his own life for such a misdeed. The CEO fell on his sword when widespread corruption in the company was exposed. Source: TFD While the notion is more at taking ...


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From these definitions and my own sense, test out implies practical testing along the lines of trying out, exploring, or putting something to the test. Testing out may also imply something less formal or rigorous than testing. You might test cameras for a magazine review (with your qualitative and quantitative results) and cursorily test out models at the ...


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One person is putting another between the devil and the deep blue sea (idiom) In a difficult situation where there are two equally unpleasant choices. Once again the affable Scot, who had already suspended the institutions twice in four months, was on the cusp of another deadline and between the devil and the deep blue sea. Lexico 'Between the Devil and ...


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My own interpretation was that "beg" must have been a (poor) synonym choice in translating "to plead", when it should have translated as "to put forth as argument", and that "question" had the meaning of "the thing in question". I'm very disappointed to find out that how I made sense of the phrase is not how ...


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"Early doors" in British English has a rather different meaning from "early days" in the linked question. Lexico has early doors informal British Early on, especially in a game or contest. you should try to wind up their star player early doors Origin Apparently originally with reference to admission to a music hall some time before the ...


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An almost-winner might receive an honorable mention NOUN a commendation given to a candidate in an examination or competition who is not awarded a prize From Oxford Languages One might consider that honorable mentions would have won the award, or placed in the top three, if the eventual winner had not entered. Therefore an honorable mention would equate to ...


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Why would anyone pluralize a word that is sufficient to complete a thought in the singular? Also, the pluralization of the word HOPE transforms it to indicate that there is more than one when there is truly only one HOPE that is being conveyed. My belief is that to pluralize the word hope is truly poor grammar!


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Wooden Spoon A wooden spoon is an award that is given to an individual or team that has come last in a competition. It was presented originally at the University of Cambridge as a kind of booby prize (see other answer) awarded by the students to the person who achieved the lowest exam marks but still earned a third-class degree in the Mathematical Tripos. ...


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Bauble An award that is given which is nevertheless lacking in real weight and significance is sometimes referred to as a 'Bauble'. For example, in this news article Dominic Raab was reported to be appointed to the constitutionally almost meaningless role of 'Deputy Prime Minister' of the UK. His new role is described thusly: But even with the bauble of ...


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Runner Up Prize Runner Up Award https://boardgamestips.com/popular/what-is-runner-up-prize/ What is runner up prize? English Language Learners Definition of runner-up : a person or team that does not win first place in a competition but that does well enough to get a prize especially : a person or team that finishes in second place. See the full definition ...


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Depends on the award. I'd start with calling it a substitute, anything else is more denigrating variants of it really. E.g. I know of people who got awarded the second highest military honours during the Vietnam war because the people writing the citations were aware that because of the political situation and/or rank of the soldier involved they'd not pass ...


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Weather Vane’s answer, consolation prize, is what first came to my mind. You could also say that the judges made it up to the recipient for not giving her the award she truly deserved. A consolation prize is always of lower value, but we make up for not giving someone a prize he deserved by giving him another of equal value. An award for the second-best ...


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Complicit. Helping to commit a crime or do wrong in some way. Describes individuals who are “folded together” metaphorically.


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Howzzabout "equally culpable"? Culpability [Middle English coupable, from Old French, from Latin culpābilis, from culpāre, to blame, from culpa, fault.] The mediator found both parties to be equally culpable.


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A non-winner might be awarded a consolation prize NOUN A prize given to a competitor who just fails to win or who has come last. A two-week holiday in Cape Town was the consolation prize. From Lexico. The word consolation itself means The comfort received by a person after a loss or disappointment.


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This is a participation award/trophy/ribbon. According to Wikipedia: A participation trophy is a trophy given to children (usually) who participate in a sporting event but do not finish in first, second or third place, and so would not normally be eligible for a trophy. It is frequently associated with millennials, those of Generation Y. When it's not an ...


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No no no! The word harumph was commonly spoken by actors forming "crowds" or "gatherings" in old movies to make it sound like there was background conversation happening. When spoken by many people at random, it sounded just like many persons conversing or mumuring. And that, my friends, is the joke.


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Missed in this context roughly means yearning for the presence of the object being missed. While this is inherently a non-positive feeling, it doesn’t have to be especially negative. It can include almost as much anticipation of reunion as it does yearning for presence, making it very nearly a positive feeling. This is unlikely to be the case when the ...


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The use of "sadly" was not intended as limiting, but rather descriptive of ONE way to describe the feeling of 'missing' someone or something. Missing in English, referring to the loss of a person, animal, event, etc. simply means to long for them or it. Sadness typically accompanies this longing when dealing with people, pets, but not always ...


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I What is exactly expressed is rather on the border of linguistics and in an area that is connected to psychology. The all-encompassing definitions of the dictionaries, in spite of the scarcity of the detail they provide is all that one can hope for, unless inclined to do much research that, I am afraid, is not what linguists are much interested in usually. ...


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To me they mean something slightly different. If there is a rule, human or physical, that defines an upper limit then I would say maximum £500, for exmple. If I were making an estimate I might say it will take me three hours max., but this doesn't imply there is any restriction, it is just my current belief that it will take me 3 hours or less. If your table ...


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Max. with the period at the end would indicate that you are shortening the word for convenience. The word max is an informal [Lexico; Collins for the 'British usage'] or slang [AHD; Collins for the 'American usage'] word that is a whole word in itself. It could mean maximum (n. and adv.), maximal (adj.), or maximally (adv.). When you say "5000 max"...


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