New answers tagged

0

Language use changes according to context. In English, when you are in familiar or relaxed contexts the vocabulary and grammar often become more informal, and more informal sentence structures often results in less words being used to convey the meaning. If words can be left out, but inferred from the context, then that often happens in informal settings. ...


0

I remember “ information made him fat”


-1

Until one gets used to associating a tragic horrible scene with the word 'heart-rending'one may be permitted to use the more sonically appropriate 'heart-rendering' until we are about to start a robot English language, which might be soon, say a twenty or hundred years.


1

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/if-the-cap-fits-wear-it I've always thought of this as meaning "If you think a criticism was aimed at you, then it probably was", though this isn't exactly how the dictionaries define it.


0

The idea is rather subtle and probably deserves to go by a term simple enough, but I think there are none. It is clearly identified in modern Anglo-Saxon culture, to wit the words of this famous song. It can be said of such persons that they are self-centered, which is not too far removed from the word "vain" that we find in the song quoted just. ...


1

This is, how I see it, a combination of words used outside any commonplace English use. For situations like these, I going back to the basics and look at a dictionary definition of all the words, and attempt to draw a meaning. (I am using Merriam Webster.) Here is "for" that could apply: Used as a function word to indicate purpose. Used as a ...


13

You're thinking of "turn him on to," as in "My friend turned me on to DJing." turn (someone) on to (something) (MWD) to cause (someone) to use or become interested in (something) for the first time


4

On the horns of a dilemma This emphasizes the difficulty of a choice. To my mind it suggests that the decision will have negative consequences in one, but not both directions. This point of view may seem at first sight difficult to reconcile with the common dictionary definition: "to choose between two things, both of which are unpleasant or difficult&...


1

How about lose-lose situation? From Cambridge: lose-lose: A lose-lose situation or result is one that is bad for everyone who is involved: He said that going ahead with the strike would be a lose-lose situation for all concerned. One could also call this a no-win situation, a situation that has no ideal solution.


0

I would consider it so. Just because the phrase, “But then...” can be used as a stand alone statement following other declarative statements as a counterpoint to those statements. Usually, it is used as an abbreviated statement when the entire statement is implied. For example, “I thought he was smart. But, then...”


-1

I am an amateur mushroom enthusiast and there is a mushroom that is called the "green spored parasol mushroom." It is one of the most common mushrooms mistakenly eaten that are poisonous. It causes severe vomiting. The gills are green during the more advanced stage of the mushroom. I wouldn't be surprised if this is where "green around the ...


1

'John is quite heroic' is a rather subdued statement, implying he could be (and perhaps should be) more so. But the use of an adjective only refers John to the quality of heroism. 'John is quite a hero' is stronger, but still does not suggest that John is altogether heroic. But a progression is seen in that the noun 'hero' is used rather than the descriptive ...


0

The verb for this, which doesn't specify the part of the utensil used, is actually spoon: [Merriam-Webster] transitive : to take up and usually transfer in a spoon Used in your example: I spooned peanut butter out of the jar. What's good about this verb is that it doesn't matter how you used the spoon, only that you did. However, if you do want to ...


0

You could say the contractor's recommendations are pulled from a hat, like how a raffle winner might be selected - the recommendation has no rational basis or support, and is seemingly random. One could also say the contractor is talking out of their ass, which occurs when a person expounds upon a subject with seeming authority, although they don't actually ...


4

Nevermind. Skimmed the book for an occurrence and it was actually “A man came in and stood up at the bar and ordered a Martini, just to pay his rent.” So he ordered a cocktail he didn’t intend to drink as “rent” for his seat at the bar.


0

Imagine you are a world-class tennis player and you find yourself playing a ten-year-old who is about as good as you expect. You don't even lose a single point, of course. Wouldn't you be embarrassed? Embarrassingly parallel problems are like that. You don't have to use any clever techniques, you just divide up the work and rake in the time savings.


0

In some contexts, "obviously". A computer salesman to an elderly gentleman who was asking a lot of "dumb" questions. Salesman: Are you new to computers? Gentleman: Obviously.


0

1/8th imperial pint of booze was called a "jack" or "noggin"(attested since the 1600s). 1/4 pint, whoa! That was called a "gill". (pronounced Jill) Have a couple gills (= 1 US cup) and you are done, alright. You've had it to the gills. Later, in the 1800s (as noted above) the term morphed into the multi-colored fish organ as ...


0

It is used to express a quick, often obvious answer, answer on a postcard: A brief, concise answer, reply, or opinion, especially one meant as a quick response to a general question. I'd like to get people's opinions on where to go for a summer vacation. Answers on a postcard, please! An answer that is considered obvious or self-evident. We'd like to get ...


0

“In full swing” is defined here: https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/in+full+swing This includes etymology—supposedly Used about an English barrister about his career being at its peak. To me it’s a sports analogy (golf).


2

It is absolutely valid, yes, for exactly the reasons you say. "The key" refers to a specific thing, "a key" means one of many such things. Although we often read "the key to success is (whatever)", obviously there are many important things that lead to success, so I look on such statements as dubious. That said, in your example ...


-1

Sorry to say but the assumption you make in the title and first paragraphs of your question (which BTW doesn't come across as a question, just saying) may very well be just falling for a case of less perfect English. No offense to the writer you linked to, but casual usage of English on this network by a multi-national community does not sufficiently show ...


0

For me, the critical verb is "bring" (by the way I don't agree with Lexico in @GEdgar's answer) If you send something or push/put something, you move it further away. Let's push that meeting forward a couple of weeks. If you bring something or pull something, you move it nearer. Let's bring that meeting forward. Can you manage tomorrow?


0

Yes, sometimes it is used this way. But sometimes not. forward (also forwards) ADVERB 3 Toward the future; ahead in time. ‘from that day forward, the assembly was at odds with us’ 3.1 To an earlier time. ‘the special issue has been moved forward to winter’ Lexico


0

In reference to this episode of Skins, I believe it's actually an insult to someone being insulting and acting superior. She was laughing at the guy like he was below her, so Effy said what she said to put her in her place.


1

How about never or rarely on the same page? From The Free Dictionary: on the same page: Of two or more people, thinking in the same manner; having the same general outlook or position. The two people who are at odds with one another are never or rarely on the same page. You could also consider these two people to be polar opposites. From the Urban ...


2

In terms of actual idioms, I will present two that show opposite sides of the spectrum—the second is what you're looking for. Always agree People who normally agree over most things get on like a house on fire: [Collins Dictionary] If two people get on like a house on fire, they quickly become close friends, for example because they have many interests in ...


1

At odds is commonly used to describe two parties who are in conflict with each other. Especially when it comes to people, incompatible can be used to describe two people who cannot get along with each other. This doesn't mean that the two people don't have a relationship with each other; couples (boyfriend/girlfriend) are commonly referred to as incompatible ...


2

I think a suitable synonymous phrase is to be 'at loggerheads'. Meaning - In dispute with. The origin of the phrase 'At loggerheads' ......'At loggerheads' is of UK origin. The singular 'loggerhead' occurs as a name in several contexts - as a species of turtle, a bird and as a place name. Originally, a loggerhead was none of these but was used with the ...


0

Due to how long the expression has been around (as early as 1913), I suspect the phrase "Where do you get off...?" is connected to a blue-collar, or lower-class point of view, associated with commuting home from work on trolley cars, and then later, buses, trains and subways. The implication might be, an offended person is suggesting someone else ...


Top 50 recent answers are included