New answers tagged

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B would like to tell A: Don't talk about things you don't know anything about. B may think that A is an ultracrepidarian, a person expressing opinions on matters outside the scope of one’s knowledge or expertise (used as a noun or adjective). The site Wordhistories shows that: This word was specifically invented to qualify the English poet and critic ...


1

I suggest tone-deaf, which Merriam-Webster defines as: having or showing an obtuse insensitivity or lack of perception particularly in matters of public sentiment, opinion, or taste The White House long ago concluded that she is aloof and politically tone-deaf. — Michael Duffy Therefore, the dialogue could be rendered as: A: Your taste in movies sucks, ...


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Second source 1: Triangulation / Backchanneling What is Triangulation? We’ve all experienced this at some point: Instead of directly expressing an opposing view or objection to something you said or did, someone has gone to a third party to complain about you. Not only is this infuriating, it can create toxic dynamics in a team by rewarding passive-...


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From the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary intercession The action of interceding or pleading on behalf of another, esp. by prayer; a prayer on behalf of another; in pl., the part of a church service at which such prayers are said. Late Middle English Intercession is causing excessive work burnout, disgruntlement, disengagement …


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In British English, we use mediation mediation = the process of talking to two separate people or groups involved in a disagreement to try to help them to agree or find a solution to their problems: "Last-minute attempts at mediation failed." "In divorce cases where there are children, mediation is preferable to going to court." ...


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Mediation may be the word you are looking for. However, it implies that the third party is trying to end the existing disagreement. The mere act of coming between is intermediation. Another word that comes to mind is intervention. Check out the meaning of intervene. If you opt for this word, make sure the context is clear, as the word has a few meanings. ...


1

The road to hell is paved with good intentions? Is 'devil in diguise' too harsh? Neither of those are a great fit. Of course the Germans have a single word for it, but this is the 'English' stack exchange. Here it is in German, if that helps: Verschlimmbesserung. That which protects, sometimes infects.


2

in our (white) working class neighborhood we used this to imply that someone was being duped, or ignored, or deceived in some way. "He said he would, do it, but you know he's just shining us" "if you can't come and get me, just stop shining then, I'll find another ride" "I asked her to come, but I guess she said "shine on that!&...


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12th of never "the 12th of never" is used as the date of a future occurrence that will never come to pass. e.g. A: So... when can I buy you a drink? B: How about the 12th of never? (Urban) If this doesn't do, you can find plenty of other answers here.


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The OP was asking for an idiom which describes the current state of the sunglasses (from the example), not one that describes the initial purchase. So it's not so much that it was cheap to purchase, but that it would be relatively expensive to replace. To me, that speaks of an item which was once cheap and ubiquitous, but is now rare and hard to find, ...


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Another case in which the verb to be may be used to express the present or perfect tense is demonstrated in this question (now closed) Emily Dickinson poem A verse is bothering me:"Where is Jesus gone?" (From “Dying! Dying in the night!) Emily Dickinson poem Christians are brought up reading the Bible: often the King James Version. The King ...


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While Wikipedia has an interesting article about the corresponding 'cultural motif in European folklore', the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) lists the following as the first two recorded occurrences of the phrase in the English language: c1570  Buggbears v. ii, in R. W. Bond Early Plays from Italian (1911) 138 Tra. Loue youe money so well? Ame. What a ...


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I may call my brother an A-hole but that privilege is not open to others. To them I will take exception and, within limits, a violent correction. That "They may be terrible people but they are our terrible people" tells the same story. We excuse though denigrate our own in comparison to other families/groups that have other terrible people. Our ...


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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heller_(money) Article indicates that the German idiom referring to a coin of very little value, due to the inclusion of copper in the mixture of metal when minting silver coins, caused the coin to gain a red or copper color, and was seen as of very little worth (c. 12th century). There remains a German phrase/idiom: "...


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The term here "clearly cut" simply means clearly displayed. The background being the moving sea or a windy cornfield does not matter so much. The story is that he had a strong reaction to seeing a man naked from the waist up in an ordinary working situation. This was not what he was used to seeing and it deserved special mention in the story, like ...


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After some research, I firmly believe that the term 'to be at loggerheads' has its origins in the Welsh language and it came about during the peace that prevailed after the battle of Shrewsbury in 1403. Up until then there had been centuries of conflict between Wales (Cymru) and England (Lloegr). The emblem of Shrewsbury is colloquially named the Loggerheads ...


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The stereotype of the passionate 'Latin' An editorial titled "Things That San Francisco Has," in the San Francisco [California] Call (November 17, 1912) describes what its author takes to be the characteristics of the "Latin" spirit: And another thing is the spirit of San Francisco. This does not mean that spirit of "gay courage&...


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By definition, an idiom's meaning cannot be found by literally interpreting every word: [countable] a group of words whose meaning is different from the meanings of the individual words So while these idioms are pretty close to their literal meanings, trying to understand the difference by pinning down the "correct" definition of day is not going ...


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I believe the word was used as congruent to 'passionate' and was(possibly is) still used to describe gypsies and such folk who are usually seen as making merry, being drunk, causing a general ruckus by being 'in the heat of the moment' and not strictly following all the rules of said society. I have not come across this particular phrasing (as in kill) but I ...


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The technical term in rhetoric is a false equivalence. Apples and oranges cannot be compared because it is a logical fallacy to presume that they are equivalent. The rhetorical argument your opponent used on you is an argument that turns on the definition of apples and oranges, saying they are all fruit. If I were on my game I might retort: that’s a ...


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OED has this for Latin under "Draft Additions 1997": Designating the characteristics of temperament or behaviour popularly attributed to European or American peoples speaking languages developed from Latin: proud, passionate, impetuous, showy in appearance, etc. Sometimes somewhat dismissive. Its first citation for that meaning is from 1914.


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There's the stereotype of Latin to mean hot-blooded Latin: Folks in colder climes can view those in hotter climes as more emotional, passionate, temperamental. Picture the Desi Arnaz character in I Love Lucy when he got angry and thought Lucy had some explaining to do. Consider that Denmark is the most southern of the Scandinavian countries. Scandinavians (...


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The phrase "dot-and-carry-one" is used by Mary Stewart in Chapter 6 of her novel The Gabriel Hounds, published in 1967. She wrote, Then I recklessly dragged the bed away from the wall. It came across the cracked marble with a dot-and-carry-one screech of broken castors. I take the "dot-and-carry-one" to mean that the bed moved in a ...


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I suggest that the person is dissimulating. The word may be applied to the hiding of many things including ignorance so is not unique to ignorance. However, if applied to ignorance, it is reasonable to suppose that the motive is for gain such as extracting knowledge or eliciting an admission. dissimulate = to hide under a false appearance "She smiled ...


3

That's called bluffing Cambridge defines it as: to deceive someone by making them think either that you are going to do something when you really have no intention of doing it, or that you have knowledge that you do not really have, or that you are someone else e.g. Is he going to jump or is he only bluffing? Tony seems to know a lot about music, but ...


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can we simply say "walk on foot" to mean go somewhere on foot? This is a useful word: OED: tautology, n. 1. Unnecessary repetition, usually in close proximity, of the same word, phrase, idea, argument, etc. Now typically: the saying of the same thing twice in different words (e.g. ‘they arrived one after the other in succession’), generally ...


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Yes, "he walked on foot" is good usage. It isn't redundant. "On foot" tells us how he walked, and what he was aware of. He could "walk with his head in the clouds", or "walked through the meadow, his thoughts soaring with the birds". To my ear, "he walked on foot" shows a lesson who is aware of each ...


2

In my townland in Ireland to be put up for the night meant to be accommodated in the loft in an improvised bed: The saying was: She put him up (accommodated him in the loft of a thatched cottage accessed by ladder) on a shakedown (an improvised bed) in the hurl (the loft space over the kitchen)


1

We are looking for / believe we have come up with a magic bullet. magic bullet [compound] noun something that cures or remedies without causing harmful side effects: So far there is no magic bullet for economic woes. [Dictionary.com]


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I think “grasping at straws” could work well here, it means trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work and trying to find a reason to feel hopeful in a bad situation: While neither of these quite captures “desperately” from you question, it depends on where you get the explanation from as dictionary.com does actually use ...


-1

One idiom is about a silver lining in a cloud. Such as: "Every Cloud has a Silver Lining." or "I'm just looking for the Silver Lining." EDIT Based on OPs comment: "Can I use this in a criticizing way?" You can use it for criticism, but it has a different form, which varies based upon emotional state. Such as: Polite: "You ...


0

I had always heard the line as “to see life as fodder”, which I thought was exquisitely poetic, and I was disappointed to learn that it is supposedly “to see life as fun”. I still hear it as “fodder”.


0

I am from the mid-western United States. To convey this meaning, we would say (Phonetically): "TOE May Toe, Tah MAH Toe" Or, if we thought the whole thig was rediculous, we'd change our town to "Pleasantly Dismissive" and say: "Aaaah, Toe May Toe, Tah Mah too; Puh Tay Toe, Puh Taa Toe." Usually followed by a hand gesture meaning ...


0

The short answer is 'No'. This saying, which I first heard from a Swedish friend some years ago, refers to the 'pet names' that parents and other family members give to their children. It does not mean 'alternative formal callings' but affectionate diminutives: nick-names, bynames. Each of these aliases usually reflects some aspect of the child's personality ...


1

"I hope it's nothing" sounds perfectly fine to my AE ears, and indeed implies nothing serious, although I'd agree with a previous commenter that "I hope it's nothing serious" sounds more natural in this particular context. "It's nothing" as a complete statement is more often heard in response to an expression of gratitude or, ...


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Is one usage more common than the other? No. Few will argue that "Few will argue" is a mere rhetorical device encouraging the listener to accept what the speaker is saying by virtue of the ad populum fallacy


0

I think the standard BE version is threshold As I stand on/at the threshold of a new chapter." OED: 1.a. The piece of timber or stone which lies below the bottom of a door, and has to be crossed in entering a house; the sill of a doorway; hence, the entrance to a house or building. 2. transferred and figurative. b. In reference to entrance, the ...


0

I'd say precipice. Standing on the precipice of a new chapter/era/etc., is a phrase often found in writings in books, newspapers, and so on. For example: Alan Wolfe, "Are you better off now?", in the New York Times, Yet maybe we do not, as he says we do, ''stand at the precipice of a new era.'' Jesse Lawrence, "David Beckham’s Final Game ...


0

I believe you are mixing metaphors. The common phrasing "stand on the ..." ends with precipice. But that is for a situation that could become very bad very quickly. A precipice is a sharp cliff, where one wrong move could be fatal but the right moves could leave to safety. A new chapter of ones life implies change, transition, or new opportunities. ...


0

Further context could be of relevance here. Do you mean a metaphorical chapter, like perhaps, a new chapter of your life? I suggest the following idiom, which you could use depending on how you want the sentence interpreted: on the cusp On the threshold or verge of a development or an action [American Heritage Dictionary] Thus, you could say— As I stand on ...


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You probably meant to say "guys let me know" which is reasonably common. Just mixed up the words.


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Take into account can also mean to "note" something such as to physically write something down. But I would not say the same for "consider", which is more about mentally accounting for something.


3

Your point is well illustrated by the Cambridge dictionary . Others are similar. to take into account = to consider or remember something when judging a situation Cambridge dictionary consider = spend time thinking about possibility or making decision; think carefully about something Cambridge dictionary But there are hints of difference. Merriam ...


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