New answers tagged

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"Fell through the cracks" https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/fall-through-the-cracks to not be noticed or dealt with: Little details often fall through the cracks. Too many young people slip through the cracks in the health system


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Phase 1: Close comparison of phrases of the form 'X [to] you some advice' As a narrow inquiry into the world of verb + pronoun + "some advice," I ran a Google Books search across the period 1800–2006 for the following phrases: "you some advice" (yellow line), give you some advice (blue line), "offer you some advice" (red line), "leave you some advice" (...


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I got it! "Sharpen the saw." That's the answer I've been looking for


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From the OP I googled “tell me some advice” which gave results of about 521,000 One of the problems with Googling English phrases, is the number of results that appear on the first page. In fact, "tell some some advice" does claim there are 531,000 results, which sounds incredibly impressive but the trick is to scroll to the bottom of the page… Note ...


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According to English Collocations, give advice, offer advice and provide advice are the correct collocations.


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Google ngrams found zero uses of "tell you some advice" and lots of uses of "give you some advice": While I wouldn't normally consider this definitive, in this case I think it can stand.


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Possibly from the Gaelic “sciodor” diarrhea. In Derry often pronounced “skitter” in English. Hence “scoots”, very frequently used to refer to diarrhea in Derry where Gaelic/Irish words are found hidden among the English. Another phrase similarly from Irish to be heard in Derry is, “See ye lamara” “ I’ll see you tomorrow”, it’s not just a lazy way of ...


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The OXFORD Collocation Dictionary suggests the following idiomatic usages. Advice: (VERB + ADVICE) give (sb), offer (sb), pass on, provide (sb with) I hope I can pass on some useful advice. So apparently tell advice, though understandable, is a non-idiomatic construction.


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Jaded resignation As in, "I used to explain the outcomes of alternative potential policies in the context of attempting to persuade others' toward my political views, but now I bite my lip in jaded resignation."


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A quotation sometimes attributed to Benjamin Franklin is An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.


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Depending on the context, this idiom might work One rotten apple spoils the barrel


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There is A stitch in time saves nine. and Don't spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar. and also For want of a nail, the shoe was lost; For want of the shoe, the horse was lost; For want of the horse, the rider was lost; For want of the rider, the battle was lost; For want of the battle, the kingdom was lost; And all from the want of a ...


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"leave of absence" is rarely used in current British and American English: simply "leave" is usually used because all leave involves an absence (from the workplace.) In current English "leave" is usually not qualified, (John is on leave") although it can be qualified if the speaker wishes to be specific: study leave; sick leave; maternity/paternity leave; ...


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To throw a fit is not particularly offensive so far as the choice of words is concerned. It is either not a dysphemism, or, at worst, is only a very mild one. On the other hand, the judgement that this phrase expresses is often offensive to the person whose behaviour is characterised by it. The offense cannot be reduced by expressing the judgement in ...


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1 and 2 mean pretty much the same thing - to invest a lot of effort into something. 3 is slightly different - it really just means you’ll inconvenience yourself to achieve a secondary goal. For example “he was in a hurry to get to work, but he went out of his way to help an old lady across the road” - it doesn’t necessarily have take a lot of effort, but it ...


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It might seem simplistic, but what about "Cheapskate" combined with employer/business/whatever terminology you're using? At least if you're trying to express the idea to others, I think that combination would be instantly recognizable to almost any English-speaking audience, especially if they're working class people.


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I agree with the comments that it comes from (at least the concept of) pinning it to a board/wall. Before the digital age, researching and investigating required more time and effort so you had to prioritize your ideas. If you had something like a story lead (needing to talk to someone or find the right person to talk with), topic to better understand (a ...


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GDoS has the following early usage examples: stick a pin (in) there! wait! hold it! 1718 [UK] C. Hitchin Regulator. (also stick a pin in that! stick a pin here!) note carefully! bear in mind! 1836 [US] Public Ledger (Phila.) 1 Nov. n.p.: Why does money become scarce? Because the bankers cannot discount, says the ...


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This sounds like wage fraud. It’s surprisingly common. This article in the Wikipedia is as good a starting place as any https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wage_theft


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In 1859, the book "Nature and Human Nature" by Thomas Chandler Haliburton included the phrase "Stick a pin in it", in a somewhat figurative manner that alludes to keeping something set apart to refer back to in the future. The Doctor has just said "God has made sunny spots in the heart; why should we exclude the light from them?" The narrator replies, "...


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That sounds like two bad things in one company policy. Poor paymaster: Tightwad employer settling for hands that come cheap. Hard Taskmaster: Tries to get the best/ most out of the employee, not necessarily by paying more, but mostly by coersion. Nick DePaul, … (Michael Bamberger on golf.com, Jan. 5, 2019) And he was a tightwad — a hard ...


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Omitting the obvious meaning, that is, if you were being served dinner, potatoes has a wide range of slang meanings, many of which the native speaker may have had in mind: Possible meaning in the context of "Do you like potatoes?" Money: "Do you like money?" Penis: Do you like penises? Menstruation (used to avoid the term "period" around those who might ...


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This kind of thing depends on what that situation is. Whether its that a loved one died or they have become broke etc. Saying "I'm here if you need me" is always great, but if they know that you are from Germany then you should be able to say "hats off" and it will mean the same.


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Someone like this can be described as a snake in the grass defined as A treacherous or untrustworthy person According to the Free Dictionary link above the idiom goes back to the Roman poet Virgil in 32 BC. The only difference between this and the Hindi idiom is that a snake in the grass can be merely neutral towards rather apparently supportive of ...


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Depends on the context, much like "kindered spirit," but: chip off the block great minds think alike cut from the same cloth These may work.


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One definition of increment is c: a minute increase in quantity (MW). So "increased in increments" or "increased incrementally." If you're trying to parallel the three-word phrase "leaps and bounds," these would be insufficient, but the meaning works.


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Dribs and drabs is an idiomatic way of expressing something that is doled out little by little over a period of time. It can be used as an antonym of leaps and bounds, which indicates swift, sudden, significant changes. Example: Attempting to learn programming by myself meant my skill was improving by dribs and drabs, but the crash course allowed me to ...


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