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Othello being the much older "crocodile-tears" reference, which I thus conclude that it must have been regarded as having a "fox-like" cunningness to it, but would it have been considered in any way of "exotic horror" or "dread"? Crocodile-tears have nothing to do with "fox-like" cunning – they are a description of feigned sorrow at circumstances in which ...


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The sayings you are referring to appear to derive from the neurological sense of nerves: From the neurological sense come Nerves "condition of hysterical nervousness," attested by 1890, perhaps from 1792. to get on (someone's) nerves is from 1895. War of nerves "psychological warfare" is from 1915. The “audacity sense is attested from ...


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The answer lies in Genesis 18-20. God is going to destroy both Gomorrah and Sodom because of their wicked ways. Apparently, Abraham's brother, Lot allowed two angels (but beware, here because the Greek word angeloi to stay in his house for the night, but some of the Sodomites (which literally means 'citizens of Sodom') come round and hand over these ...


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As mentioned in the comments, Science Fiction writers, led by the mathematician Charles Howard Hinton, explored the consequences of the fact that the mathematical theory of space can be extended to dimensions of number greater than the 3 we see around us. If one could "access", "manipulate" or "travel" in a fourth dimension, i.e. one independent of the three ...


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There is something that has been bugging me about depiction of foreigners in various English media (that doesn't occur, say, in Polish media). The "foreigner" characters keep replacing common English words they clearly know with common words from their mother tongue in regular, relaxed, every day situations. This is relatively easily explained: ...


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