192

I am not aware of a suffix per se with that meaning, but I sometimes see the idea expressed by forming a pairing with the word agnostic. Although the first meaning of this word is specifically about religious belief, it can also be used in a more general sense: a person who is unwilling to commit to an opinion about something (Merriam-Webster) ...


155

As far as I know, no. We could make one up, here. "-phile" and "-phobe" are derived from the greek words "philia" (love) and "phobos" (fear), so we'd want to look for an greek word meaning "indifference", I think. "adiaphoria" looks like an early contender, being what Google translate comes back with for "indifference". There is already a philosophical ...


90

I propose '-meh' Arachnophobe Arachnophile Arachnomeh In the right tone of voice, I think that could work. Meh, Wikipedia Meh is an interjection used as an expression of indifference or boredom. It may also mean "be it as it may". It is often regarded as a verbal shrug of the shoulders


76

"Lemma" is from a Greek word that had t in some of its forms Etymologically, the t in lemmatize comes from the stem of the Greek word λῆμμα, which is the source of the English word lemma. Greek nouns have many inflected forms: the citation form λῆμμα is just the nominative (and accusative) singular form. Most other forms of a Greek noun are built on a stem ...


73

It appears that I probably draw a finer distinction here than others may, but the good thing is that for those that say the two are interchangeable, my usage will seem unremarkable, and for those that care, my usage will seem consistent. I use extendable in cases where it means the opposite of retractable. In other words, a telescoping wand is extendable, ...


59

Google Ngrams shows that updatable is currently much more prevalent:


54

I've always seen falsy and truthy. Falsey is a perfectly acceptable alternative and gives me just as many search results. The word is unfortunately too new to provide good sources. The ECMAScript Language Specification uses “⟦ToBoolean⟧” to refer to the interpretation of of non-Boolean values as Booleans, but makes no use of truthy or falsy. These terms are ...


54

It's an ordinal indicator: In written languages, an ordinal indicator is a letter, or group of letters, following a numeral denoting that it is an ordinal number, rather than a cardinal number. Historically these letters were "elevated terminals", that is to say the last few letters of the full word denoting the ordinal form of the number displayed as a ...


54

General principle: Latin plural forms go with Latin singular forms The plural of the Latin word matrix is matrices, and the plural of the Latin word index is indices. We took the singular forms of these words from Latin unchanged, and the same goes for the plural forms (unchanged in the spelling, anyway; the pronunciation has been anglicized). But prefix ...


51

I think you may be looking for protege: protege — a person who receives support and protection from an influential patron who furthers the protege's career


47

-ess is, in fact, a feminine suffix. The male or neuter form (English tends to conflate the two) would be tempter. As a note, the title The Tempter, with capital letters, is given to the Devil. A person who tempts in a sexual fashion might be called a seducer (seductress if female).


37

The root word drama fits: "This is due to the drama of the day." Drama 3 a : a state, situation, or series of events involving interesting or intense conflict of forces b : dramatic state, effect, or quality - the drama of the courtroom proceedings - M-W


37

Michael Quinion, Ologies and Isms: Word Beginnings and endings (2002) has this entry for the suffix -eroo: -eroo Also -aroo, -aroonie, and -eroonie. An informal and often humorous intensifier of nouns {A fanciful formation of uncertain origin} This ending is most common in North America, Australia, and New Zealand. It appeared in the U.S. in the ...


35

The key element of a phobia as a mental disorder is its irrationality. No one will claim that you're suffering from pyrophobia if you run out of a burning building. Calling a particular prejudice a phobia is an attempt to call out the irrational component of that prejudice. There is a parallel to "homophobia" in descriptions of prejudice against black ...


35

It seems you are looking for a concise, easily understandable term for someone who is neither a -phile nor a -phobe. I would suggest the suffix -neutral. It may be more of an adjective than a noun, but it can be pressed into service as a noun by ellipsis. Thus: Which of the following describes you best? I am a technophile I am a technophobe ...


34

I think both can be used interchangeably, although the context sometimes determines which word you are more likely to use. For example, in linguistics, an affix after the stem of the word is called a suffix. In computer programming, when an operator appears after the operand, it is known as a postfix operator. As far as a file extension goes, my intuition ...


33

It is a perfectly idiomatic (natural) and productive pattern used in informal English but not common in formal writing. The parachute deployed at the last moment, a successful trial drama-wise. 'X-wise' acts like an adverb, where X is a noun. It can be translated to 'with respect to X'. The suffix '-wise' It is being used more and more lately. It can ...


32

Some businesses provide less experienced staff with mentors. I have heard the mentors refer to their "mentees". Wikipedia says this is a recent term.


32

It is unfortunately common for writers to attempt dialogue in Early Modern English, even though they do not know this language. This typically results in a panoply of howlers: -th and -st added randomly to verbs, thee used as the subject of sentences and thou as the object, mine used before consonants, and vocabulary used in anachronistic senses. There's ...


31

From the quoted definitions at etymonline, I would suspect that you may be asking the wrong question :) If I look at the related words in other languages (dag, Tag) for day, it seems the final g has changed into a [j]. The same seems to have happened with (Dutch) leggen -> English lay. As it is normally pronunciation that defines spelling, and not the ...


30

Voicing Assimilation is the technical term for what happened here. In English (and Latin, and most Indo-European languages, among many others), /b/ and /p/ are identical in pronunciation (both are bilabial stops), differing only in their Voice parameter; /b/ is Voiced, while /p/ is Voiceless. It is a fact about the human vocal tract that consonant ...


30

There is already a word for converting something to English: Anglicization /Anglicisation (AmE/BrE) 1 : to make English in quality or characteristics 2 : to adapt (a foreign word, name, or phrase) to English usage: as a : to alter to a characteristic English form, sound, or spelling b : to convert (a name) to its English equivalent <anglicize Juan ...


29

The question should be: where did that i come from. If we look at etymonline we find the following: (emphasis mine) explain (v.) early 15c., from Latin explanare "to make level, smooth out;" also "to explain, make clear" Originally explane, spelling altered by influence of plain. Also see plane (v.2). In 17c., occasionally used more literally, of ...


28

All these formations are modeled after the Watergate scandal which you mentioned. That scandal, in turn, took its name from the very innocently named Watergate Complex, a group of buildings in Washington DC which happened to house the office which housed the documents that were stolen as part of the Watergate Burglaries, and thus ended up giving its name (or ...


28

There is no universal affix in English equivalent to the German suffix behaftet. Instead, there are two different ways to form this kind of adjective in English. The suffix -ful suggests that the noun modified has the quality in question in abundance. It is a limited suffix that can be used only with certain words: hopeful, but not hungerful. The past ...


28

If a word ends in -exia, such as dyslexia, anorexia and pyrexia does this imply anything about the word itself? It doesn't necessarily imply something about the word. Josh61's answer (which you should read, and which I won't copy here) gives an excellent explanation of the suffix "-exia," used in the word "pyrexia" and also for some other medical ...


27

A mythological creature called succubus is described as the ultimate temptress, using sexual seduction to lure its prey. The male counterpart, incubus, similarly uses sexual seduction to lure in prey. These terms can be used to describe seductive people whose ultimate goal is self-serving or else makes no consideration for the wellbeing of the person being ...


25

The suffix -eroo appears to be an analoguous post-formation derived, in the view of many, from the Spanish vaquero - a cowboy. Julian Mason (in American Speech, Feb. 1960, pp. 51-55 - available through Duke University Press, albeit behind the pay-wall of JSTOR) cites a novel by one Owen Wister, Jimmyjohn Boss (1900): "Yep. Cow-punchers. Vaqueros. ...


24

The Online Etymology Dictionary explains the unusual spelling: late 13c., from Middle English fier “fire” (see fire (n.)) + -y (2). The spelling is a relic of one of the attempts to render Old English “y” in fyr in a changing system of vowel sounds. Words like miry (late 14c.) and wiry (1580s) have later origins and different etymology, so they don’t ...


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