32 votes

Is post-hyphenation necessary in "I am a child and adult psychologist..."?

The best way to do it, I think, would be to forgo the hyphens completely and go with: I am a psychologist who works with children and adults. Anything else is awkward, ambiguous, or both. If it's ...
Heartspring's user avatar
  • 8,592
27 votes
Accepted

Non-existing or nonexisting

Short answer: neither. The word you want is nonexistent. Longer answer: You can actually add a "non" prefix to any word to make up something new, even if it's not in the dictionary. (If you ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
22 votes

When someone spells out letters in dialogue, should they be capitalized? "P-L-E-A-S-E" vs. "p-l-e-a-s-e"

Whether in dialogue or not, proper naming of a single letter of the alphabet varies by style guide. Options include uppercase, lowercase, in quotes, bold, or italics: Chicago Manual of Style (CMOS) ...
Ellie Kesselman's user avatar
20 votes
Accepted

Is it 'medium-to-long term' or 'medium to long-term'?

Many writers would use a suspended hyphen. Medium- to long-term. You're allowed some discretion on this matter, as reputable writers are not entirely homogenous in their hyphen usage. Between the ...
RaceYouAnytime's user avatar
19 votes
Accepted

How should a multiple-word noun be punctuated within a compound adjective?

Bryan Garner, Garner's Modern American Usage (2003) has a useful discussion of this problem in his lengthy coverage of phrasal adjectives: E. The Compound Conundrum. When the first or last element ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
17 votes
Accepted

Which spelling is correct: "Re-order" or "Reorder"

Reorder. With re- words, you should use ‘re-’ (with a hyphen) if the next word begins with an ‘e’ or a ‘u’ (when not pronounced like ‘you’). Otherwise, don’t hyphenate. It’s therefore re-...
Michael's user avatar
  • 1,797
15 votes

Is post-hyphenation necessary in "I am a child and adult psychologist..."?

Another easy solution: I am a pediatric and adult psychologist. Since "pediatric" is an adjective, this eliminates the ambiguity.
alphabet's user avatar
  • 17.5k
13 votes
Accepted

"Opt Out" or "Opt-Out"

"Opt out" without the hyphen would be taken as a verb--that is, to opt out or remove oneself from something. I've opted out of attending the conference. "Opt-out" with the hyphen may be used as a ...
Aleksandr Hovhannisyan's user avatar
11 votes

dog-leg, dogleg, or dog leg?

If you look closely at the ODO (Oxford Dictionary Online), they claim that dogleg is American English, while dog-leg is British English. They could have made this clearer, but if you're maintaining an ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
11 votes

How old is the practice of hyphenating compound adjectives?

To identify a “no later than” date for the use in English publishing of hyphens in compound modifiers that appear immediately before nouns, I ran Google Books searches for the words booke and boke for ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
10 votes

Differences between "machine learning" and "machine-learning"

The hyphen shows you mean {machne learning} methods, that is: methods for machine learning, and not machine {learning methods}, that is, learning methods for machines.
GEdgar's user avatar
  • 25.1k
10 votes

Is post-hyphenation necessary in "I am a child and adult psychologist..."?

Is it something like: "I am a child- and adult psychologist? To use that format you would have to be consistent: "I am a child- and adult-psychologist." Note I have just found this ...
chasly - supports Monica's user avatar
9 votes

What should one use when introducing dialogue, hyphens, en-dashes or em-dashes?

If you must use something other than quotation marks for dialog, here is The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.) 6.91: Em dashes are occasionally used instead of quotation marks to set off dialogue (à ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
9 votes

Hyphenation of "second most northerly"

I'd be inclined to write this as "the second most northerly coffee shop in Seattle", with no hyphens. But hyphenation is far from a definite area of English punctuation. I don't think any of the ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 81.7k
8 votes

How do you spell wifi / Wi-Fi / WiFi?

The correct spelling is Wi-Fi even if wifi is most used. Google Trends clearly shows this: If it's technical document, I would use Wi-Fi. But, if SEO is very important, I would use wifi (+other ...
Valeria Magoni's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Reimplement or re-implement?

Thanks for all the answers, but I found what I was looking for in the Hyphens with the Prefix re article: Rule: Use the hyphen with the prefix re only when re means again AND omitting the hyphen ...
Greg's user avatar
  • 343
8 votes

Should there be a hyphen in expressions such as "currently-available X"?

I've seen many manuscripts (and some published books) that contain compound modifiers joined by a hyphen even when the first word of the compound modifier is an adverb ending in -ly. As a matter of ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
8 votes
Accepted

When to use "once-in-a-lifetime" and when to use "once in a lifetime"?

In general, hyphens are used to construct compound adjectives: I had to catch an early-morning train. I like late-night television. She wears extra-large socks. Hyphens are not used when the words ...
HemiPoweredDrone's user avatar
7 votes

Is it "front-end", "frontend", or "front end"?

"Front end" but "front-end engineering." It's really pretty simple: When you're using a compound as an adjective (that is, when it's modifying another noun) you hyphenate it, not because somebody said ...
Howard's user avatar
  • 71
7 votes

Should you hyphenate "high demand"?

My understanding is hyphenation would be appropriate when using "high-demand" as a conjoined adjective (e.g. "they charged more for this high-demand item than they typically would charge"); otherwise, ...
Jonesy's user avatar
  • 81
7 votes

13 Month Old or 13-Month-Old?

General rule of thumb with compound adjectives like this is to hyphenate them if they are made up of words which modify the base adjective and couldn't be used independently. The best way to gauge ...
John Clifford's user avatar
7 votes

Why hyphenate no one: no-one?

It's not a typo, it's a deliberate decision to use a hyphen. "no-one" is sometimes used with a hyphen - some people believe that this avoids confusion with the other usage of "no one" meaning "no ...
Max Williams's user avatar
  • 23.1k
7 votes

"Opt Out" or "Opt-Out"

It depends what part of speech it is. Verb: No Hyphen opt out Choose not to participate in something. ‘you can opt out of the state pension scheme’ Oxford Dictionaries Noun: Hyphen opt-out An ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.1k
6 votes

Pronunciation of "-" sign, particularly in Unix commands

The comment above is correct in that the term "tac" originated in the Navy, used as a flag separator. This made its way into the Unix environment as the options specified after a command are referred ...
Austin's user avatar
  • 61
6 votes

How to refer to the collection of horizontal line characters?

Unicode now calls all of these "Dash" characters (meaning, they have the "Dash" property, not that their names mention dash): U+002D ‭ - HYPHEN-MINUS U+058A ‭ ֊ ARMENIAN HYPHEN U+05BE ‭ ־ HEBREW ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 134k
6 votes
Accepted

Should hyphenated compound words be permitted to break across lines?

Yes, at least according to the Purdue OWL: For line breaks, divide already-hyphenated words only at the hyphen: mass- produced self- conscious
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.1k
6 votes
Accepted

Amino acid vs. amino-acid

Your intuition is correct. According to the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's Guide to Nomenclature and Symbolism for Amino Acids and Peptides: When the phrase 'amino acid' is a ...
jejorda2's user avatar
  • 5,776
6 votes
Accepted

"Side effects", or "Side-effects"?

A great resource open to you for looking at the frequency of words or phrases is Google Ngram Viewer. As Brian Donovan said in the comments, this Ngrams analysis answers the question quite well: As ...
BladorthinTheGrey's user avatar
6 votes

Hyphenation of "second most northerly"

A hyphen should be used to force the parsing "(second most) northerly" rather than "second (most northerly)". Thus, it should be "second-most northerly".
Acccumulation's user avatar
6 votes

Why does English hypenate compounds, while German just mashes them together?

First of all, note that the problem is a little bit more complex. English can separate parts of a compound with a space (orange juice), nothing (football), or sometimes a letter (bridesmaid). German ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
  • 4,395

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible