New answers tagged

2 votes
Accepted

Does the spelling of suffixes change in some cases like prefixes?

It depends on how you define suffixes. You could say that notoriety and spontaneity end in the same suffix spelled two different ways (-ety and -ity). The very common suffix -(e)s also changes based ...
user avatar
  • 74k
21 votes
Accepted

Why "monatomic" and not "monoatomic"?

OED says that monatomic is formed within English, by compounding; probably modelled on a French lexical item and provides the etymology below: < mono- comb. form + atomic adj., probably after ...
user avatar
  • 52k
0 votes

Why "monatomic" and not "monoatomic"?

It seems that "monoatomic" is the British spelling version and "monatomic" is American. It is said that it is rare to see "monoatomic". But both are correct. According ...
user avatar
  • 599
1 vote
Accepted

Why is "hammock" spelled the way it is?

I've found an interesting explanation regarding the origin and the adoption of the spelling of hammock. It is suggested that the term hamaca was misapplied by Columbus and his sailors which was ...
user avatar
  • 52k
1 vote

Why is "hammock" spelled the way it is?

The OED gives the early forms of the spelling of hammock: α. 1500s–1800s hamaca, 1600s hamacca, hamacco, hamackoe, hammacho, 1700s hamacoe, 1700s–1800s hammacoe. β. 1600s hamack(e, hammac(k, hammaque,...
user avatar
1 vote

Is it "falsy" or "falsey"?

Given that it is a term with a specific meaning used by programmers, I searched stackoverflow.com to see how that programming community have used it. 9,155 results for falsy (7,674 results for "...
user avatar
  • 161
5 votes
Accepted

Meaning of 'the consonant s, which no more belongs to the word, than any other letter in the alphabet'

Webster is making the rather exaggerated assertion that the spelling island has no more legitimate etymological basis than icland, ifland, imland, or ipland would. The argument that the s in island is ...
user avatar
  • 151k

Top 50 recent answers are included