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-3 votes

What's the best way to bowdlerize an expletive but keeping the meaning understandable?

In the books by P.G. Wodehouse, his stories on boarding school often revolve around upper classmen making the lower classmen serve them and treated them as their personal servants. They describe the ...
Lucky Day's user avatar
7 votes

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t?

Perhaps a comedy answer but honestly, I’ve always thought that “which” has a missing “t” whereas “witch” is perfectly sensible as written. Nothing silent there. In my view , it’s the ones WITHOUT the “...
Judy D's user avatar
  • 575
1 vote

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t?

Some people pronounce "witch" the same as "which", that is, making the "t" silent. Others pronounce the "t", "witch". Your examples of words where &...
Jay's user avatar
  • 36.7k
2 votes

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t?

According to LPD (Longman Pronunciation Dictionary, 2008) the trigraph "tch" is regularly pronounced /tʃ/; this means that "tch" is not considered as t followed by "ch", ...
LPH's user avatar
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31 votes

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t?

There's no rigorous or official definition of what a "silent letter" is. The sound represented by the letters "tch" in "witch" is what linguists call an affricate. These ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.4k
1 vote

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t?

Apart from the fact that a few Americans still aspirate the /h/ in which (long gone in BrE), the full Oxford English Dictionary gives exactly the same pronunciations for both witch and which... which ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes

Defense vs. Defence in Canadian English

Following up on Jason Bassford's answer, I note that The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (Oxford University Press, 1998) not only begins its entry for defence with this: defence n. (also defense)... [...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 165k
0 votes

Defense vs. Defence in Canadian English

There are a few other words that can help inform the always-changing Canadian style for this, such as licence/license, and it is by part of speech used. Simply, the verb/participle usually uses an &...
user2881274's user avatar
-1 votes

Is the spelling 'judgment' a feature of American English? (As opposed to the other -dg[e]ment words?)

If the base word, "judge" for example, ends in "e" that is part of the word and should not be removed. If it doesn't, "develop" for example, an "e" should not ...
Ted's user avatar
  • 9

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