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27

Forward slashes have been around forever (well, at least since Ancient Rome), but they were just called "slash". Backslashes, on the other hand, are a fairly recent invention. How ASCII Got its Backslash reports that it was added to the ASCII character set in 1961 for the Algol programming language. The term rose in popularity in the early 80's, probably ...


23

People have mentioned in the comments that, yes, in the past, a small (non-breaking) space was inserted before an ! and a ? These must never start a new line. The space is also a small space, very clearly much more than the space between letters of a word, but much less than a sentence-ending space. See, for example, this: And: From an 1899 edition of ...


21

The difference is that "everytime" is not a word, and "every time" means all occurrences: "Every time I go to the beach, I get a sunburn." You may be thinking of the difference between "everyday" and "every day." The former is an adjective that can mean either daily or ordinary and common, and the latter is an adverb meaning each day: "I don't have any ...


18

According to dictionary.com, it should be two separate words "time slot". This useful article on compound words offers the following advice: Many of them are found in the dictionary and are not subject to our interpretation, our judgment, or our whim. Start with your dictionary before applying any other guidelines. I would be inclined to follow that ...


17

Here you're using however as an adverb, meaning no matter how or in whatever way. Since you said that your intention is "no matter how you analyze the data, the output would remain poor", however is the correct choice. When one uses how ever, "ever" usually takes the role of an intensifier -- it increases the strength of the statement being made with "how". ...


16

The Chicago Manual of Style recommends a nonbreakable space before and after an ellipsis when the intention is to trail off a sentence. 13.52 Ellipses with other punctuation. Placement of the other punctuation depends on whether the omission precedes or follows the mark; when the omission precedes it, a nonbreakable space should be used between the ...


15

This is a technical term, used in discussing computer data storage. Both forms, filepath and file path, are used, but which one is used is often dependent on context. While I can’t find any specific reference for usage in context, my experience has been that filepath, as an unhyphenated compound word, is generally used when discussing it as an entity (...


13

No, they aren’t doing the same thing. It's because these a- words are mostly ancient prepositional phrases in origin that eventually got squished together — but into adverbs, not quantifiers or adjectives. Consider aback, abroad, above, afoot, across, afar, ahead, ajar, akin, alike, aloud, amid, apart, atop, away. That a- portion was an unstressed ...


9

The correct phrase is "Once in a while", as two separate words. As "awhile" is an adverb, it wouldn't make sense to say "Once in awhile". See @V0ight's comment: Replace 'awhile' with any other adverb, like 'rarely' or 'seldom' and you'll see it makes no sense. 'Once in rarely'? 'Once in seldom'?


8

Just to add an Australian perspective to this one... The Commonwealth Government Style Guide (Sixth Ed.) says: The spaced form, per cent, is recommended: it is the one most commonly used in Australia; it is given priority by both the Macquarie and Australian Oxford dictionaries. It does go on to add ( in support of the earlier answer): However, percent ...


8

In the unix world it was just called a slash. The backslash was the escape character. When MS-DOS came around and used the wrong slash to delimit subdirectories, programmers referred to that as slash also; the context determined whether it was one or the other. It was not until non-technical people started using URLs that technical writers felt the need to ...


8

No, there would be no space. When writing abbreviations that represent multiple words and that have periods appear within them, we don't put spaces after the internal periods. Examples: a.k.a. - also known as d.b.a. - doing business as e.t.a. - estimated time of arrival


7

In my opinion, just because "an other" is "vanishingly rare", that doesn't make its usage "unacceptable". In my situation, which is advising (via a letter) a candidate for an employment position who has not been chosen, it doesn't seem appropriate for me to tell him that "another" candidate has been selected, but it does seem appropriate for me to tell him ...


7

Both are acceptable, but cannot is now more common. OED has this much to say about cannot: (ˈkænət) the ordinary modern way of writing can not: see CAN v. Notwithstanding, in some situations ambiguity may arise if you write can not, and the difference might not be a minor one. Compare: I cannot make love to you. (Something is stopping me from it, be ...


7

Anyway is an example of a discourse marker, one of whose functions is "to indicate what speakers think about what they are saying or what others have said". (Swan, Practical English Usage, p138). Swan groups anyway together with anyhow, at any rate, and in any case, and describes their function as follows: These four expressions are used (mostly ...


7

As a matter of modern technical writing style, 500 gigabytes can be written as 500 GB or 500GB. As a matter of grammar, fusing '500' and 'GB' into '500GB' makes as much sense to me as fusing '3' and 'apples' into '3apples'. I always separate numbers and the things that they count with a space, unless the things that are counted are represented by a symbol (...


7

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) states regarding any one: "The two-word form any one is not the same as the one-word form anyone and the two forms cannot be used interchangeably. Any one means ‘any single (person or thing)’, as in: not more than twelve new members are admitted in any one year." Meanwhile, the one word form anyone is defined ...


7

The AMA Manual of Style says: Thin spaces should be used before and after the following mathematical symbols: ±, =, <, >, ≤, ≥, +, −, ÷, ×, ·, ≈, ∼, ∩, ∫, Π, Σ, and |. a ± b a = b a + b a − b a ÷ b a × b a · b a > b a < b Symbols are set close to numbers, superscripts and subscripts, and parentheses, brackets, and braces. (Highlight mine) ...


6

No, I don’t think so. That would be like spelling et cetera as *etcetera without a space. It is not like ensemble either, which was one word to start with. The OED has lots of French phrases of the form en XXX that have been borrowed into English, and I don’t see a single one of them that collapses its spacing: en attendant en avant en axe en barbette en ...


6

I wonder if it could be a US x UK issue. I have always learnt and used 'any more' (two words) in all contexts, and come from a British family unit, attending a British School. So we would have: John doesn't live here any more (UK) John doesn't live here anymore (US)


6

My English teacher at school was adamant that on to was always two words, a position which is acknowledged by ODO: The preposition onto written as one word (instead of on to) is recorded from the early 18th century and has been widely used ever since, but is still not wholly accepted as part of standard British English (unlike into, for example). Many ...


5

Historically, another and an other are simply two ways to write the same thing, and those dictionaries that are extensive in their example quotations may include an other as an example of another. A similar word is cannot which is merely a way to write can not. There is no difference in meaning between the two; all meanings of all sense of one are also a ...


5

The APA Style Blog comes down firmly on the data set spelling. Although dataset is understandable, two words still seems to be preferred even in academic settings.


5

In most technical settings, hostname is used — I would stick to that if you are writing for a technologically savvy audience, as host name can mean "the name of the host" which is not necessarily always synonymous. To clarify somewhat on another answer posted here; 'login' may now be recognized as one word, but that doesn't mean that it's not also two ...


5

According to the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, fifth edition (2011), whitelist is spelled closed up both as a noun and as a verb, just as blacklist is. But that is merely one dictionary's judgment of where the spellings of the two words stand today. The broader question remains, Why are some words spelled open while others are ...


4

Enroute is certainly acceptable, as an equivalent to en route or en-route, when used as a term of art in aviation. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/En-route_chart


4

As I understand the official SI manual (which siunitix is supposed to follow), there should be a space, not a thin space, between the number and the unit: The numerical value always precedes the unit, and a space is always used to separate the unit from the number. (section 5.3.3) I also find that this seems to be the more common procedure in typed ...


4

The first. Parentheses should have spaces on either side, just like words. For example (taken from The Punctuation Guide): Parentheses (always used in pairs) allow a writer to provide additional information. The parenthetical material might be a single word, a fragment, or multiple complete sentences.


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