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69

It should be sign up, as that is the verb form (see definition 30). Signup (or sign-up) is a noun. That pattern usually holds: log in (verb) vs. login (noun), sit up (verb) vs. situp (noun), etc.


27

Forward slashes have been around forever (well, at least since Ancient Rome), but they were just called "slash". Backslashes, on the other hand, are a fairly recent invention. How ASCII Got its Backslash reports that it was added to the ASCII character set in 1961 for the Algol programming language. The term rose in popularity in the early 80's, probably ...


24

Wavelength has been adopted as a term for a dimension (of measurement). The other phrases have their respective terms (wave height: amplitude), as such they are separate individual words.


22

You certainly do not want to use full spaces within strings of initials. Indeed, you quite possibly do not want to use any spaces at all. It depends whether we are talking about text generated under the tyranny of the typewriter or text that is to be professionally typeset. With a typewriter, you should not use any spaces, but when typeset, smaller spaces ...


21

There may be no consensus among the standards bodies, but outside of technical writing at least, it doesn't matter what the ISO says. Modern U.S. usage overwhelmingly uses no space. Note that Wikipedia uses no space, as in the article for Percentage. Demonstration As a demonstration, one can download the first billion bytes of an English Wikipedia database ...


20

The difference is that "everytime" is not a word, and "every time" means all occurrences: "Every time I go to the beach, I get a sunburn." You may be thinking of the difference between "everyday" and "every day." The former is an adjective that can mean either daily or ordinary and common, and the latter is an adverb meaning each day: "I don't have any ...


19

The reason that wavelength is only one word is that humans commonly form new words by combining existing words together. This is called compounding, and is observed over and over by linguists studying the evolution of languages. The reason that the other terms you mention, “wave height” and “wave speed”, have not compounded is that they are different from “...


18

Nowadays, the word is nowadays. You can find it in any dictionary (unlike now days). The better ones will also have the etymology: late 14c., contracted from Middle English nou adayes (mid-14c.), from now + adayes "during the day," with adverbial genitive (see day). As you can see, it used to be two words — seven centuries ago. The Corpus of ...


17

Here you're using however as an adverb, meaning no matter how or in whatever way. Since you said that your intention is "no matter how you analyze the data, the output would remain poor", however is the correct choice. When one uses how ever, "ever" usually takes the role of an intensifier -- it increases the strength of the statement being made with "how". ...


16

People have mentioned in the comments that, yes, in the past, a small (non-breaking) space was inserted before an ! and a ? These must never start a new line. The space is also a small space, very clearly much more than the space between letters of a word, but much less than a sentence-ending space. See, for example, this: And: From an 1899 edition of ...


16

"Home page" was used first, but "homepage" followed soon after, is also acceptable and I prefer. Homepage was used to refer to the main page of a website as early as July 1993. Home page was used to refer to the main page of a website as early as September 1992. The first web browser was only written (by Tim Berners-Lee) in 1990-1991. Home page was used ...


15

According to dictionary.com, it should be two separate words "time slot". This useful article on compound words offers the following advice: Many of them are found in the dictionary and are not subject to our interpretation, our judgment, or our whim. Start with your dictionary before applying any other guidelines. I would be inclined to follow that ...


13

The Chicago Manual of Style recommends a nonbreakable space before and after an ellipsis when the intention is to trail off a sentence. 13.52 Ellipses with other punctuation. Placement of the other punctuation depends on whether the omission precedes or follows the mark; when the omission precedes it, a nonbreakable space should be used between the ...


13

No, they aren’t doing the same thing. It's because these a- words are mostly ancient prepositional phrases in origin that eventually got squished together — but into adverbs, not quantifiers or adjectives. Consider aback, abroad, above, afoot, across, afar, ahead, ajar, akin, alike, aloud, amid, apart, atop, away. That a- portion was an unstressed ...


12

Both percent and per cent are acceptable. The ODO's AmE entry carries the following note: Origin: mid 16th century: from per + cent, perhaps an abbreviation of pseudo-Latin per centum Both spellings, percent and per cent, are acceptable, but consistency should be maintained. Percent is more common in US usage; per cent is more common in British ...


11

This is a technical term, used in discussing computer data storage. Both forms, filepath and file path, are used, but which one is used is often dependent on context. While I can’t find any specific reference for usage in context, my experience has been that filepath, as an unhyphenated compound word, is generally used when discussing it as an entity (...


10

Here is a general rule of thumb: if you mean "a different [noun]", then it is more appropriate to use "an other"; if you mean "an additional [noun]", then it is more appropriate to use "another". So in your example you should use "But it won't transform it to an other format." Also take a look at Brett Reynolds' answer. It is good from a syntactical point ...


10

Note that wavelength is a noncompositional compound. It does not refer to the length of a wave, but rather to the length of a single oscillation period of the wave: the reciprocal of the frequency. It is technical jargon which does not mean wave length. Generally we write two words as one when they are used so often and in such a specific way, that the ...


10

Home page vs homepage falls into the same category as website and Web site as well as motor home and motorhome. Originally, the words homepage, website, and motorhome did not exist, but after so much usage over the years it has become acceptable to combine the two words into one. In other words, either way is fine.


8

The OED has both flavors: 1850 Tennyson In Mem. xxxiv, ― My own dim life should teach me this, That life shall live for evermore. 1872 Longf. Christus Introitus 46 ― Forevermore, it shall be as it hath been heretofore. I myself would do the second; it goes with Poe’s nevermore. Are you sure you need the for part? Might evermore alone suffice? From ...


8

The only full answer is “because it is”. There are rarely complete answers to “why” questions in linguistics. But a clearly relevant factor is that there is a need to talk about wavelength much more often than wave height, because wavelength is a property of all kinds of wave (including sound and electromagnetic radiation), whereas height is a property only ...


8

In general, grammatically, fallback is a single word, normally a noun. The meanings are what you see on the wikipedia page and notice that in all cases, they're nouns. On the other hand, fall back is two separate words, a verb and an adverb (except in the case of the fall back and forward protocol). So you can fall back, but you can't fallback. You can have ...


8

Just to add an Australian perspective to this one... The Commonwealth Government Style Guide (Sixth Ed.) says: The spaced form, per cent, is recommended: it is the one most commonly used in Australia; it is given priority by both the Macquarie and Australian Oxford dictionaries. It does go on to add ( in support of the earlier answer): However, percent ...


8

You can use either of U+202F NARROW NO-BREAK SPACE or just plain U+00A0 NO-BREAK SPACE, but you certainly should not let it risk being line-broken. I’m not so sure that the thinness matters half so much as the no-break property. You do not want to let the figures get orphaned without their units.


8

Both are acceptable, but cannot is now more common. OED has this much to say about cannot: (ˈkænət) the ordinary modern way of writing can not: see CAN v. Notwithstanding, in some situations ambiguity may arise if you write can not, and the difference might not be a minor one. Compare: I cannot make love to you. (Something is stopping me from it, be ...


8

In the unix world it was just called a slash. The backslash was the escape character. When MS-DOS came around and used the wrong slash to delimit subdirectories, programmers referred to that as slash also; the context determined whether it was one or the other. It was not until non-technical people started using URLs that technical writers felt the need to ...


7

A lot depends on which scientific field you're talking about. The style sheets for the Linguistic Society of America and the American Psychological Association, for instance, could hardly be more different. Me, I always use e.g, ending with a comma or occasionally a colon if it's followed, as usual, by a list of examples. No space necessary, though if you'...


7

The general rule is that, in a capitalized hyphenated compound word, both words are normally capitalized if they are of approximately equal significance. In "great-uncle," "uncle" is the more significant part; "great-" is simply modifying "uncle" after all. So sign yourself "Great-Uncle Don." Or, dodge the hyphenation entirely, and sign yourself "...


7

Anyway is an example of a discourse marker, one of whose functions is "to indicate what speakers think about what they are saying or what others have said". (Swan, Practical English Usage, p138). Swan groups anyway together with anyhow, at any rate, and in any case, and describes their function as follows: These four expressions are used (mostly ...


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