Hot answers tagged

14 votes

Has the conception of prepositions broadened?

This broadened conception of a preposition has a long history, but its recent popularity is thanks to its appearance in Huddleston & Pullum's The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (2002). ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 17.5k
12 votes

Where is the subject in "as was traditional for unmarried women"?

Strange as it may sound, the subject of "was" is, in the opinion of many renowned grammarians (please read N.B. below), the relative pronoun "as". In that sentence, "as" is not a conjunction but a ...
Gustavson's user avatar
  • 3,190
11 votes

Where is the subject in "as was traditional for unmarried women"?

As __ was traditional for unmarried women, Jane lived at home her entire life. It has no overt subject. The expression in bold is an adjunct of comparison with the preposition "as" as head. The ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 12.5k
11 votes
Accepted

The correct negative form (past participle)

Both ways are grammatical. In some cases, one form will be more idiomatic than another form, but there is no general rule as to which one you should use. All the following sentences are correct: Our ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
10 votes

Clause structure of "Five'll get you ten, this rain stops in three minutes."

You have a main clause with a zero-that that-clause (warning: grammar terms vary). Five’ll get you ten is an idiom meaning chances are good. Five’ll get you ten [that] this rain stops in three ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 16.5k
9 votes

Where is the subject in "as was traditional for unmarried women"?

The subject of "was" is apparently missing. This is a complex sentence, so not all parts have to have all the elements of a main clause. The main clause of the sentence is the second part, "Jane lived ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 81.6k
7 votes

Is "Do this, please" an imperative sentence?

Short answer (tl;dr) In terms of illocutionary force, or type of speech act, the addition of the word please will change the sentence from an order to a polite request (all other things being equal). ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

If or since, does it make a difference?

Yes it does. 1)Since you are unemployed, why did you leave your last job? 2)Since you are innocent, why did you flee? 3)Since you are a Christian, why do you believe in a personal God like this?...
candied_orange's user avatar
6 votes

Is "That is so cheap!?" an exclamative?

It can be tricky in this area if we do not nail down two distinct ideas. On the one hand we have the illocutionary force of an utterance. So, for example, if I say: You went there on Thursday? with ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
6 votes

Types of Clause

A clause is a sentence constituent that has a subject phrase and a verb phrase. What is called in grammar school a "simple sentence" is just one clause, with just one subject phrase and one ...
John Lawler's user avatar
5 votes

"With tiredness and underperformance the result" - Two adjacent noun phrases

The two NPs after "with" are from the absolute construction "with tiredness and underperformance being the result" reflecting the optional deletion of "being". Similar constructions are "with no one (...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 17.3k
5 votes

Do I need a comma in this sentence?

I'm not entirely sure I understand the exact question, but: "are these alcohol shakes or something else?" If you capitalize the first letter of the sentence, it's perfectly fine. It does ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Subordinate clause types/functions

She begged him [not to leave her]. The colonel commanded his men [to charge]. How can we encourage a baby [to use that toy properly]. Yes, the bracketed clauses are subordinate, but they are not ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 12.5k
5 votes
Accepted

What is the direct object of "I imagined" in the context "as I imagined would be the case"? (i.e. I imagined what?)

'I imagined' does not have a direct object here, instead 'imagined' allows the clause that follows '___ would be the case' where there is a gap in the subject position. The whole construction headed ...
DW256's user avatar
  • 8,714
5 votes

Types of Clause

Types of clause can first be categorised as follows: Declarative - making a statement [You are very tactful.] Closed interrogative - asking a closed question [Are you very tactful?] Open interrogative ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 12.5k
4 votes
Accepted

Some clause structure about “SOURCE said that CLAUSE”?

Both varieties have the same syntactic structure. The difference is lexical, semantic, and pragmatic. Mental process verbs like believe and think take complements describing the mentation. They don't ...
John Lawler's user avatar
4 votes

Should I use 'which' or 'that' in my sentence?

The rule for use of that and which in relative clauses   (both words have many other uses -- this rule is for relative clauses only) is in restrictive relative clauses like the book that he ...
John Lawler's user avatar
4 votes

Why don't we use "do" in an interrogative object clause?

Short answer Only the matrix clause in a sentence requires subject-auxiliary inversion to make it interrogative (and not if the wh-word is part of a Subject phrase). In other words, all other things ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
4 votes

Why don't we use "do" in an interrogative object clause?

In English, you used to be able to form questions by inverting the verb and the subject. So Shakespeare could say where go you with bats and clubs? We no longer do this: If the main verb has an ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
4 votes

What is the name of this grammatical phenomenon?

As a figure of speech, this is called anacoluthon—when you break the grammatical structure of a sentence and begin a new construction or a fragment of a construction. This Greek word means "that which ...
Cerberus - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
4 votes

Wh-clause after a preposition

In my experience, it is speak to, not speak for, and yes, it can be used with an interrogative content clause: The constant clashes between locals and immigrants speak to how difficult it is to ...
ruakh's user avatar
  • 15.2k
4 votes

Is it correct to use "...and as a result,..." to link two independent clauses? Is the comma after "result" necessary?

The usage you have shown is incorrect. Anything parenthetical, i.e. anything that can be optionally dropped, needs to be surrounded by commas. In this case there should be a comma after the "and" in ...
Paul Childs's user avatar
4 votes

What is the merit of calling a verb phrase a clause?

Well, this is a question about grammatical terminology, not about grammar, or English grammar, as I understand it. I've looked at a bit of the prior discussion here, comments and answers, but I'm not ...
John Lawler's user avatar
4 votes

where to put the possessive "s" with an appositive parenthetical

There's nothing wrong with the possessive marker at the end. Compare The king of England's crown, where the -s is at the end of the noun group. It does sound a bit more awkward if you have a whole ...
Oliver Mason's user avatar
  • 3,244
4 votes

Can I omit a subject in If-clauses?

This kind of ellipsis only works if the omission consists of the subject and a form of the verb 'to be' and the omitted subject appears in the main clause either as the subject or the object. If (...
Shoe's user avatar
  • 33.1k
4 votes

What is an example of "where" in an adverb clause?

[1] [Where I'm going] is none of your business. [2] No one knows [where he is]. [3] It's interesting [where these things have come from]. [4] This is [where I want to be]. [5] This is the park [where ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 12.5k
4 votes

Constructions of the form 'He has committed I don't know how many crimes.'

Hyperextension of adjectives is not two or even three. They are longer phrases and sometimes even a full sentence used as a prepositioned adjective. AKA multiple hyphen compound adjective Also dealt ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 14.8k
4 votes
Accepted

Is it a noun clause or phrase when the nominal entity is modified by a determiner?

Your bag is in [your locker]. "Your locker" is not a clause but a noun phrase with the noun "locker" as head and the genitive pronoun "your" as determiner. Its function ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 12.5k
4 votes

The correct negative form (past participle)

Where there is the negated adjective, it is usually the idiomatic choice: 1 We complained but as usual our voices went unheard. 1' *We complained but as usual our voices went not heard. (went ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
4 votes

Clause structure of "Five'll get you ten, this rain stops in three minutes."

You could infer some hidden structure, such as an omitted subordinator. For example, you could take the comma to represent the word "that". On the other hand, if you take the surface ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible