21

The default pronoun to use in English is the objective case. See this EL&U.SE answer. For example, if you were to label a picture, you would label it "me at the beach in 2011" and not "I at the beach in 2011". The signature is neither a subject nor an object, as it is not part of a sentence. Thus, the correct pronoun is "me".


19

"But" functions as both a conjunction and a preposition. If you look at "but" as a conjunction, it leads to that other sentence -- "she does not like you". But if you look at "but" as a preposition, it means "except for". https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/but If "except for" were substituted for "but", the preposition would take an object, in the ...


11

There is my biscuit. My biscuit is there. There is one biscuit left. (1) and (2) are locatives, and there is a locative adverb indicating the location of the biscuit. The structure is identical, but (1) is transformed from (2). Locative sentences can do that: My sister is over there, by the weeping willow. Over there, by the weeping willow, is my ...


11

Out of context the sentence StackExchange is the website I wanted to win is inherently ambiguous because of the nature of the verb to win, which is ambitransitive. In other words, win can be both transitive and intransitive: She won the award. (transitive) She won. (intransitive) So if Polly is a cat and I read the decontextualised sentence Polly is ...


11

Strange as it may sound, the subject of "was" is, in the opinion of many renowned grammarians (please read N.B. below), the relative pronoun "as". In that sentence, "as" is not a conjunction but a relative word equivalent to sentential relative "which", but, unlike the latter, which always appears after the sentence to which it refers, "as" can precede the ...


10

In Old English, thou was used for addressing one person and ye for more than one, both as clause subject. Thee and you were used as object. During the Middle English period, ye/you came to be used as a polite singular form alongside thou/thee. During Early Modern English, the distinction between subject and object uses of ye and you gradually disappeared. ...


10

That depends on what you want to say. If you are talking about politics in general, use the singular: Politics both fascinates and repulses him. If, however, you are referring to specific politics, for example those of a person, use the plural: John's politics both fascinate and repulse him. This is because politics can mean different things. The ...


10

Sentence 3: Existential Subjects: Words, Phrases and Functions [A Comparison of Sentences and analysis of Sentences 1 & 2 forthcoming] There's one biscuit left. So now the burning question is: What is the subject of this existential sentence? This isn't as easy as it looks. If we want to answer this question we need to really understand what a ...


10

It would be better to link them together with a colon: Collective nouns can either be singular or plural: plural when thinking of individuals in the group, singular otherwise. You might want to rearrange the sentence so that the word plural does not immediately follow itself. A colon is useful here because the first half of the sentence sets things up (...


9

The subject of the verb is an invention - which is singular, so the verb-form should be too. Here are a few written instances of "are an invention that has". Note that Google Books contains no examples of "are an invention that have". Don't bother even thinking about what Microsoft Word recommends or queries - at best it might be useful for flagging up ...


9

The subject of hoping is team; questions is a red herring, as can be seen by considering How many questions...? Is or are there would not depend on whether the answer is 'One' or 'more than one'; it depends on team. So the question comes down to "Is team singular or plural?", and unfortunately, the answer is "It depends". This question and this one ...


9

You only have one subject in your sentence: "decades of research". Research modifies decades, but decades is definitely plural, so the correct sentence is Decades of research have shown The same is true the other way: A line of cars is standing on the road. A bag of apples costs $2.


9

This is an interesting question. In the Original Poster's sentence she is indeed the nominative case pronoun. It is also true that we associate this case marking with the subjects of finite verbs - such as the verb is in the original example. However, occasionally we find nominative case pronouns in non-subject positions. Here she is in fact not the subject ...


9

These types of sentences are referred to as presentational constructions. They consist exclusively of intransitive verbs: *There ate John a lion. (ungrammatical, transitive verb) The verbs that allow this kind of usage quite often take no Complement at all. If we have a very big, often indefinite, Subject and there is no Complement of the verb, such ...


9

As __ was traditional for unmarried women, Jane lived at home her entire life. It has no overt subject. The expression in bold is an adjunct of comparison with the preposition "as" as head. The comparative clause functioning as complement to "as" is structurally incomplete as I've marked with __ to represent the missing subject, though it is recoverable ...


8

In the first sentence, traditional grammar regards I as the subject and the cake as the object. In the second sentence, the cake is the subject and there is no object. Functional grammar, however, takes a rather different view. It calls the subject and object Participants and the verb a Process. In the first sentence, I and the cake are Participants and ate ...


8

In “The average bundle price paid was a little over $8”, price or bundle price is the subject and was is the verb. Average modifies bundle price or bundle price paid. In any case, “average bundle price paid” is a noun phrase forming the subject of the sentence.


8

The subject of "was" is apparently missing. This is a complex sentence, so not all parts have to have all the elements of a main clause. The main clause of the sentence is the second part, "Jane lived at home her entire life." I found the following explanation in"A Short Overview of English Syntax based on The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language," by ...


7

English has is a zero-marked valency transformation which allows the object of many verbs to be used as a subject, with the object unspecified. He burned down the house. The house burned down. Or: The sun melted the ice. The ice melted. Note that this is not the passive! The passive voice in English is formed with be + PP, eg: The car was driven on the ...


7

Consider 'Lots of cheese is good for you' vs. 'Lots of cheeses are good for you.' The 'is' and 'are' cannot be interchanged. Evidently the plurality of 'lots of X' is determined by X, not by 'lots.' Whether this rule 'makes sense' is another question, but so long as it holds, there is no contradiction with the other rule you described as applied to your ...


7

It is of no use at all to users of a language as users. You can use a language your entire life without knowing what a Subject is, just like you can live your entire life without knowing anything about metabolism. But teachers trying to explain to a learner why a particular expression is wrong or why a particular expression requires a different form, or ...


7

The 'sentence' you asked about has no overall subject. It’s an example of artistic license where the rules of grammar get broken, not due to grammatical incompetence, but for some literary reason, typically resulting in fragments of a sentence being used, as your quote demonstrates. The result here is that the sequence you asked about is not actually a ...


7

It looks grammatically correct, but it doesn't sound right because people don't use it. "Would you be interested?" is the more common way. In fact, I've only heard non-native English speakers use "Would you have interest." When I taught EFL years ago, I would often revert back to the "it doesn't sound right excuse" and when pressed more, I would delve into ...


7

I don't think signing a letter with a personal pronoun fits into the conventional format of a letter. As such, I don't think this question is really answerable. You can do whatever you want; you're already breaking the rules of letter-writing. Some old-fashioned closings for letters made use of a copulative verb before the signature. E.g. see the following &...


6

Looking at the effective interaction with the dozens, I suggest that the singular is appropriate. You are paying one price for the lot. As such six dozens is being treated as a single collective unit. Six dozen roses costs 60 rupees. [You are buying one thing] If you were quoting a price for each dozen, you probably would say Six dozen roses cost 10 ...


6

The sentence contains an example of a dangling modifier. Here is the opening text of the Wikipedia article of the same name: A dangling modifier (a specific case of which is the dangling participle) is an ambiguous grammatical construct, often considered an error in prescriptivist accounts of English, whereby a grammatical modifier could be ...


6

They also have an article entitled "California Chrome permitted to use nasal strip in Belmont Stakes", suggesting that it's the horse that will not be prevented, and as such has an even greater implication of volition. There are some uses of use that are clearly not implying volition on the part of the subject. Plants use photosynthesis. ...


6

This is an example of pro drop (short for pronoun dropping). Some languages, like Spanish, pretty much mandate it. Such languages are called pro-drop languages. In English, most grammarians would probably consider it ungrammatical, but it's pretty standard in informal speech. Regarding its occurrence in English, Wikipedia writes: English is considered a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible