62 votes
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Shakespearean relative clause: "I have a brother is condemned to die"

TL;DR In the half a millennium since Shakespeare was writing, English has evolved new and different rules of grammar. In early modern English, relative pronouns were omissible when they represented ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
29 votes
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How to correctly apply "in which", "of which", "at which", "to which", etc?

The trick to knowing how to use; of which, at which, in which, to which, from which is to analyse the prepositional phrases, phrasal verbs, verbs and prepositions: He /spoke of/ war and peace ...
Lambie's user avatar
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27 votes

Shakespearean relative clause: "I have a brother is condemned to die"

One factor I think is relevant is that this is a line of verse—"I háve a bróther ís condémned to díe" is in iambic pentameter, like the next line ("I dó beséech you, lét it bé his fáult") (Measure for ...
herisson's user avatar
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18 votes
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Can a sentence start with relative clause (that, which etc.)?

That's not a relative (adjective) clause; it's a that-clause—a noun clause (warning: grammar terms vary). It functions as a noun does in its various roles: subject, object, complement, appositive, etc....
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
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12 votes
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Is there a term for the grammatical/rhetorical construction of "He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named"?

I think it is a case of Antonomasia: a literary term in which a descriptive phrase replaces a person’s name. Antonomasia can range from lighthearted nicknames to epic names. The phrase antonomasia ...
user 66974's user avatar
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9 votes

Is "I am who(m) God made me" grammatical?

It's grammatical. As per my answer at SAH's question, it's grammaticality is flushed out when one adds what has been (or can be taken to have been) elided, so: I am who/m God made me to be. For ...
Arm the good guys in America's user avatar
9 votes
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Does the word "that" refer to "features" or "windows 9x"?

Both instances of "that" refer back to the specific features alluded to at the beginning of the sentence when it says "a number of features". Microsoft built a number of features into Windows 9x that ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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9 votes

Is this natural? "There's somebody wants to see you."

This isn’t correct in written English and I believe it’d be considered a mistake here on the West Coast of the United States, although it shouldn’t be a big deal to misspeak one word in a sentence, ...
Davislor's user avatar
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7 votes
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Do I need another 'which' in this sentence?

The second which is optional, but the first which should be a that because it's restricting "possible careers" [Grammarist]. You might want to consider rewriting your sentence as follows, sticking ...
Richard Kayser's user avatar
7 votes
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How can the relative pronoun 'which' have an adjectival phrase as its antecedent? Exactly what may act as antecedent for 'which'?

Relative clauses with which can have a wide variety of phrases as antecedent, despite the fact that which is often described as a relative pronoun: Preposition phrase - They alleged the party was on ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
7 votes
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Meaning of the sentence "the body was found murdered by John"

The first version has at least three meanings: John found the body; John did the murder; someone found Mr S murdered and lying at the side of John (we don't know if John was dead too, or merely lying ...
Anton's user avatar
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7 votes
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'the one you said you liked best' - Analysis of a relative clause using CGEL

In comments Araucaria wrote: There is no relative phrase as this is a 'bare' relative. The relativised element is the gap after the verb liked in the VP [liked ___ best]. Its syntactic function is ...
7 votes

Is this natural? "There's somebody wants to see you."

It doesn't look as though anyone has addressed your third question yet, so I'll give it a shot. Omitting the relative pronoun "who" would be unusual in formal speech. (As you can see from ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
7 votes

What is the subject in the relative clause “that it affects the Earth's balance"?

It's not a relative clause, even if it does start with that. There are better ways to identify relatives. The clause that it affects the Earth's balance is a complement clause that's part of the so ...
John Lawler's user avatar
6 votes
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She or her in a relative clause where she is both subject and possessor

It should be her, because it is the object of the preposition of. Her is not part of the relative clause: the relative clause only includes who and what follows. The role of who in the relative ...
Cerberus - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
6 votes
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Use the object pronoun or the subject pronoun as the relative pronoun heading a restrictive clause that employs a transitive verb and a linking verb?

James is the man who we know ____ is who won it. Here, "who" is not object of "know" but subject of the embedded "is" clause, marked by gap '___' . "Who won it"...
BillJ's user avatar
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6 votes

What is the subject in the relative clause “that it affects the Earth's balance"?

People have extracted so much underground water [that it affects the Earth's balance]. As DW256 says, the bracketed element is not a relative clause but a declarative content clause. Its function is ...
BillJ's user avatar
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5 votes

Can "where" ever be used as the subject of a relative/adjective clause?

Given the examples He went back to Santa Monica, which was his hometown. (The comma is necessary for a non-restrictive relative clause) *He went back to Santa Monica, where was his hometown. (...
John Lawler's user avatar
5 votes

"that which" used together

"That which" = What For example; We feel great admiration and respect for those who gave their lives for this country. Our people will long remember that which they did/ what they did.
Birhatbartin's user avatar
5 votes

"Tools are a sound investment that result in..." or "...that results in..."?

I would use "result", because in my opinion it refers to the noun "tools". But another suggestion I would like very much: "Tools are a sound investment resulting in significant gains in ...
Konstantin's user avatar
5 votes

Is "I am who(m) God made me" grammatical?

The reason is that traditionally, you can't use who in fused relative clauses; that is, you cannot use who when it figures in two clauses, being the subject (object) of one and the subject (object) of ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
5 votes

What's that you say? [Syntactic role of 'you say']

What's that you say? "You" is the subject of the subordinate clause "you say." Just to clarify- "that" is the demonstrative noun that is the subject of the sentence. ...
Karlomanio's user avatar
  • 1,291
5 votes

Is this natural? "There's somebody wants to see you."

According to this reference "who" should not be omitted in this sentence. (PristineWord) Look at this sentence. Correct The waiter who served us yesterday was rude. The subject of the ...
LPH's user avatar
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4 votes

"It was the kind of story that / where you had to be there." -- Are the relative words 'where' and 'that' interchangeable? What does 'where' mean?

When you replace where with that or which, sometimes you need to add a preposition. For example, This is the company where he works, becomes This is the company that he works at. How do you ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
4 votes

"It was the kind of story that / where you had to be there." -- Are the relative words 'where' and 'that' interchangeable? What does 'where' mean?

In the first example (the story where...), 'story' is thought of as a place in which some events happened, and we want to talk about the events that happened in the story, not the story itself. That's ...
Færd's user avatar
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4 votes
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Reversal of Relative Clauses

A partial answer to your question is that the subordinate clauses which can be moved to the front are sentence-modifying adverbials, and other sentence-modifying adverbs, like "necessarily" or "...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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4 votes

Do I need another 'which' in this sentence?

The second "which" is definitely optional, and leaving it out makes the sentence much crisper too. Drawing an analogy to a mathematical equation in the form of x(a+b) = xa + xb, here's how the ...
insanity's user avatar
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4 votes

The correct usage of "which"

I believe this is another of those zombie rules that is not based in actual usage. Certainly, which was used to refer to phrases and sentences by celebrated authors in the 19th century: Jane Austen, ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Can an objective relative pronoun replace a subjective relative pronoun?

Your second example with whom is unremarkable; see this Language Log article: Whom loves ya? (The title is deliberately non-standard) Geoffrey K. Pullum says In cases where a relative or ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 81.9k
4 votes

Where to draw the line separating non-essential and essential relative clauses

Okay, here goes. I will analyze each of your nine sentences. 1) This is perfectly grammatical and sensical. As you said, "which happens to be glowing red" is a relative clause. 2) Once again, this ...
Khuldraeseth na'Barya's user avatar

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