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9 votes

What does “summer and winter” mean?

Isn’t it a bit strange for someone to choose winter for swimming among four seasons? That's rather the point. Around the United Kingdom, the sea is so cold in winter that most people wouldn't go ...
Simon B's user avatar
  • 2,912
8 votes
Accepted

What's the difference between adjuncts and modifiers?

In short: adjuncts may or may not be integrated into the syntactical structure of the sentence. If they are, they are called modifiers; if they are not, supplements. There is also a category that ...
linguisticturn's user avatar
6 votes

Origin and usage of "day of"

Indeed, this expression is idiomatic to a number of native speakers. Significantly, it’s part of my dialect. The expression is an ellipsis of “the day of [the event]”, and there are more possible ...
Laurel's user avatar
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6 votes

Was it common in Shakespeare's time for adverbial phrases and objects to precede the verb in spoken English?

One important factor is that Shakespeare usually wrote in iambic pentameter. This tells where the stress falls on the words. The rhythm is often described as de DUM dee DUM. I could write it in music ...
chasly - supports Monica's user avatar
6 votes

Adverbs in the mid-position when there is more than one verb

What is called "mid-position" in your grammar corresponds to what is termed "medial position" in A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language". In this latter grammar, this ...
LPH's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

What is the function of "Monday?"

Neither. It is a noun, but it is not being used as a direct object, but as a time adjunct. This is a function that can be carried out by phrases headed by words belonging to various parts of speech (...
herisson's user avatar
  • 81.9k
5 votes

Is “senior year” a direct object or something else in “I played my senior year”? What about “perfect game” in “I threw a perfect game”?

In "throw a game" the thing you are throwing is a game, so it's a direct object. (The use of "throw" in this sense is figurative; it doesn't really matter that the game isn't ...
tripleee's user avatar
  • 289
5 votes

Can 'as unique as it is' mean 'because it is unique'?

I am going to explain the meaning of each of your examples in turn: (1) As it is unique, our past leads to our identity and personality. This means: Because it is unique (the sentence doesn't really ...
Jelila's user avatar
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4 votes
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What does “summer and winter” mean?

The definition can be found in the Oxford English Dictionary: during both summer and winter; all year round (Winters and summers means the same, and dates back much further, to Old English.)
Laurel's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Does "So as long as" mean the same as "Just as long as" in this sentence?

It has been my experience that occasionally younger speakers who are comparatively unfamiliar with the forms and styles of written English can become confused by so..as, and that they do not use this ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 135k
4 votes

Present participle result

TLDR: For whatever reason, questions regarding the possible syntactic structures involving ‑ing phrases / clauses are among the most common questions we get here, especially but hardly exclusively ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 135k
4 votes
Accepted

What is the function of "their way" in "they went their way"?

And they that were sent went their way, and found even as he had said unto them. I don't see any reason why the NP "their way" should not be considered direct object of "went".
BillJ's user avatar
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3 votes
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When and why can you omit “when” (or other conjunctions or prepositions) before a gerund clause that’s used adverbially?

The additional words you are using all add meaning to the sentence. 'When' indicates a there was a specific time in the past (although it is not specified). 'While' indicates it occurred during the ...
Manhatton's user avatar
  • 570
3 votes

Preposition of manner

Preposition phrases ordinarily follow the term they modify or complement, so changing the order often changes the meaning. However, determining whether a PP modifies or complements, and just what a ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Usage of at in a question

Consider this sentence: The moment I rang the dinner bell, the hordes descended on the dining room. Yes, you could say "At the moment I rang the dinner bell", but you don't need to, and the ...
aparente001's user avatar
  • 21.5k
3 votes

Wrong use of adverbial (prepositional) phrase?

In the construction ADJ-est of NOUNs you should parse ADJ-est as a nominal —The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language describes it as an adjective which has 'fused' with its head, the noun ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
3 votes

Participle Phrases as Adverbs

Removing his coat is a subordinate clause, one with the role of a depictive adjunct in the structure of the main clause. These sorts of -ing clauses acting as adjuncts (traditional grammar's '...
DW256's user avatar
  • 8,862
3 votes

Is "for sure" an adverbial phrase?

Summary The prepositional phrase for sure comprises the preposition for and its complement sure, which is an adjective. It remains a prepositional phrase no matter what use you put it to. It is not ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 135k
3 votes
Accepted

Which part of speech is "as" in each example of mine?

[1] He is [the same as the dog (is)]. In [1] "as" is a preposition and the expression "as the dog (is)" is thus a preposition phrase functioning as complement of the adjective &...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 12.9k
3 votes

What's the difference between "in the same year" and "the same year"?

As a native British English speaker, the sentence as written: "It remained constant at this level till May the same year" sounds fine, and I wouldn't say "in the same year" in that ...
Leachoid's user avatar
  • 593
3 votes

Is the phrase "for us to put the books on" an adjectival or adverbial phrase?

Adverbials answer questions that provide context in a sentence (e.g. why, when, where, how, etc.), whereas adjectivals describe participants (nouns and pronouns) in a sentence. Hence, adverbials can ...
serencog's user avatar
  • 156
2 votes

Can we reduce this adverb clause? "In winter, the Magdalen Islands are almost as isolated as when they were first discovered by Cartier."

One alternative: "...as when Cartier discovered them."
John Visosky's user avatar
2 votes

Adverbial clauses or Gerunds! Which one is this?

It helps to have the full context of the words you quote: Knowing that a man is not justified by the works of the law, but by the faith of Jesus Christ, even we have believed in Jesus Christ, ...
deadrat's user avatar
  • 44.7k
2 votes

Noun phrases acting as adverbials

According to Huddleston & Pullum (2002), "the moment I saw here" is a noun phrase acting as a temporal location adjunct (p. 698); in more traditional terminology, you might say it's ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 18.5k
2 votes

Is there an adverb meaning "by volunteering"?

Offered = volunteered Meeting in cafes, or sometimes in a private home, offered by one or another member, we would discuss a wide range of subjects.
aparente001's user avatar
  • 21.5k
2 votes

Is this an adverbial complement? "They led me _to believe that there was no danger_."

No, this is not an adverbial complement. The sentence pattern is indeed S-V-O. The subject and verb are obvious. The direct object is the entire clause following, me to believe that there was no ...
Khuldraeseth na'Barya's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Adverbial modifier with the insertion of comma

In English, bracketing commas or their lack around participial phrases, appositives, or relative clauses signal whether the element is essential (restrictive), i.e. whether the phrase is essential to ...
KarlG's user avatar
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2 votes

Why does "An Advanced English Syntax" say the infinitive in these sentences is adverbial?

I like to think of this in terms of questions answered by the specific bit of sentence, rather than in terms of inherent potentialities of a specific word ("ill" vs "happy"). Consider: --"How are you?...
Hilda Foster's user avatar

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