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The term adverbial is a bane to the principled study of language. It is the epitome of the worst problem in the field of language study - a problem which should by now be regarded as a schoolkid problem - the problem of not understanding the difference between syntactic functions (or grammatical relations) and parts of speech or types of phrase. For a few ...


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The accusative is a noun case in various languages including German and Latin and Greek; as applied to English the term denotes the objective case, shown in personal pronouns me, him, her, us, and them (in contradistinction to the subjective case, sometimes termed nominative, of I, he, she, we, and they). An absolute construction is a way of tying an extra ...


4

It has in it fat, which gives energy. This is an example of what is called object postposing. In English, we normally expect to see direct objects occurring directly after the verb: I have a baboon. Other complements of the verb, including Adjective Phrases or Preposition Phrases functioning as predicative complements, will come after the direct object....


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Briefly defined little means 'Small in size, extent, quantity, amount or duration" and "Not great or large." The word "way" has many definitions in Noah Webster's 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language but the one that is almost assuredly applied here is: "2. Length of space; as a great way; a little way " In other words, she walked a short (...


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In the last year, last year, in the past year How do such things come into being? We may assume that the beginnings were something like this: When was it? - That was in the last year. Then you may assume that this was shortened to: That was last year. The omission of self-evident "in" does not change the meaning. Then "last year" alone can be used as an ...


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In the phrase "past year", year denotes a period of 365 days before the time being mentioned; "Last year" refers to the previous calender year. Situation 1: Today is Jan. 1 2015 I went to NY on Jan. 1 2014. Then I would say: "I went to NY in the past year". Situation 2: Today is July. 20 2015 I went to NY on Jan. 1 2014. Then I would say: "I went to NY ...


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Consider this sentence: The moment I rang the dinner bell, the hordes descended on the dining room. Yes, you could say "At the moment I rang the dinner bell", but you don't need to, and the sentence flows better without "at". Same with your sentence. About commas -- you could use commas, but they're optional here. It's not a very long or complex ...


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In the construction ADJ-est of NOUNs you should parse ADJ-est as a nominal —The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language describes it as an adjective which has 'fused' with its head, the noun it modifies. The of NOUNs phrase designates the entire 'set' of NOUNs to which the nominal is compared. You may paraphrase this by extending these parsings: ...


3

The additional words you are using all add meaning to the sentence. 'When' indicates a there was a specific time in the past (although it is not specified). 'While' indicates it occurred during the course of a broader time in the past. 'By' indicates it was the cause of the experience. The rule would be that you use a connecting word that adds the ...


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I would call it an ''absolute construction''. While it is grammatical here, it is semantically very odd, because it is normally used in (somewhat literary) narrative, for an event which preceded the action of the main clause, but did not specifically cause it. A more conventional example would be Dinner eaten, we went out. So dinner eaten means when ...


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I think it's an abbreviated form of [With] the tax (having been) raised, It seems reasonable to call this an adverbial clause modifying close down.


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Perhaps of interest: Studies in Early Modern English - Page 245 Dieter Kastovsky - 1994 They were: cruel vs. cruelly, exceeding vs. exceedingly, excellent vs. excellently, extraordinary vs. extraordinarily, full vs. fully, might vs. mightily, pure vs. purely, singular ... occur well before the introduction of normative grammars in the ...


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Linguistically speaking, English is primarily an SVO language. (Subject-Verb-Object) There might be cases the verb comes last, but this isn't one of them. Your second part was SOV.(Subject-Object-Verb: Appearence-men-is) I wouldn't bet on it being grammatical. (My native Hindi is SOV, as is your Korean, according to wikipedia. Maybe that caused the ...


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It means a short distance. I couldn't find it in the dictionary after a brief search. However, I did find the opposite: quite a ways. quite a ways (spoken) a long distance - The Free Dictionary I think they mean to say a little ways.


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They were quite champions today. That version is not used but perhaps not for the reason you think. Let us start with the singular. He was quite a champion today. That is possible but not the usual idiom. We are more likely to say: He was quite the champion today." I have no idea why. Pluralise that and you get: They were quite the champions today. ...


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One alternative: "...as when Cartier discovered them."


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It helps to have the full context of the words you quote: Knowing that a man is not justified by the works of the law, but by the faith of Jesus Christ, even we have believed in Jesus Christ, that we might be justified by the faith of Christ, and not by the works of the law. Knowing is a present participle, a verb form obtained by adding the suffix -...


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Offered = volunteered Meeting in cafes, or sometimes in a private home, offered by one or another member, we would discuss a wide range of subjects.


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Preposition phrases ordinarily follow the term they modify or complement, so changing the order often changes the meaning. However, determining whether a PP modifies or complements, and just what a PP means as either a modifier or complement, is often very complex. For instance: Mayra is very happy in her life with Harry. Here with Harry is almost ...


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No, this is not an adverbial complement. The sentence pattern is indeed S-V-O. The subject and verb are obvious. The direct object is the entire clause following, me to believe that there was no danger. This type of clause is known as an infinitive clause. It consists of a subject, me in this case, and an infinitive or an infinitive phrase (the latter is ...


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In English, bracketing commas or their lack around participial phrases, appositives, or relative clauses signal whether the element is essential (restrictive), i.e. whether the phrase is essential to making a noun/noun phrase specific and defined, thus becoming an integral part of the noun phrase and not marked with commas, or nonessential (nonrestrictive) ...


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You're asking a good question, but you're making a bad assumption which makes it impossible to answer. What sort of sentence structure can allow many adverbs to occur together? The answer is that they are modifiers, and the nature of modifiers is that many can occur together. Adjectives are the most familiar case of this, where a single noun can be ...


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Briefly, no. Although we like to see a coordinating conjunction hold lists of nouns, verbs and independent clauses together, the same does not apply to coordinate modifiers. Consider the string of simple adjectives: "She wore an itsy-bitsy, teeny-weeny, yellow polka dot bikini." Look ma, no conjunction. Similarly, look at a series of coordinate ...


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'Quite' can't be used without a determiner in these constructions. Although constructions like 'Those were quite some days!' cannot be labelled ungrammatical, the exact construction used affects acceptability or at least idiomaticity. Thus 'Those were quite some guys!' sounds better than 'They're quite some teachers!' or 'They're quite some ...


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Quite technically cannot be used in front of a plural noun and still be grammatically correct. Using the instead of a/an when adding quite in front of a plural noun is really an idiomatic expression showing uniqueness. ex. She is quite the singer or They are quite the group of boys As @Jim added above, quite the champions would be usable, but when looked at ...


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I found this discussion helpful. Why does Wikipedia say in the water is an adverbial? Because the function of the prepositional phrase serves to tell us one of the traditional adverbial things about the verb. Which things are generally time, place, or manner. The cite (and site) above gives a baker's dozen of expanded categories of adverbial action. ...


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(Sorry about the misery-guts examples) This topic is not covered by the BBC analysis or Wiki, or other introductions, It is not the verb which is being qualified in these examples, but a Noun which in this case is the subject. The fiddler on the roof wears an afghan coat. The group behind the bike shed carry butane lighters. ... But To begin at the ...


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