176 votes

"It really doesn't matter" v "It doesn't really matter"

When the adverb really comes before a negated auxiliary, the effect is of emphasising the truth of the sentence: I really cannot tell the difference. Here the speaker is emphasising that they ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
28 votes

"It really doesn't matter" v "It doesn't really matter"

Ultimately the word "really" means the same in both cases, of adding strength or emphasis. If we swap "really" for "definitely" this becomes more clear: The first one is like "It definitely ...
Max Williams's user avatar
  • 23.1k
17 votes

"It really doesn't matter" v "It doesn't really matter"

I think it helps a lot to break these two sentences down: It really doesn't matter: The base sentence here is It doesn't matter. Really is an adverb which modifies doesn't. In this case, it puts ...
nmg49's user avatar
  • 687
13 votes
Accepted

Is there a difference between "Who necessarily do not exist" or "who do not exist necessarily"?

Yes, there is a difference. "Who necessarily do not exist" means that those people do not exist due to some need or requirement. This is saying the "who" do not exist. "Who do not exist necessarily"...
Benjamin Harman's user avatar
10 votes

Is “On Sundays, my sister and I never play hockey” correct?

There are no rules in English, there is only guidance. “Rules are for the obedience of fools and the guidance of wise men.” Adverbs, adverbial phrases and adverbial clauses have a default order in ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 41.4k
9 votes

"It really doesn't matter" v "It doesn't really matter"

When dealing with modifiers, it is crucial to understand what is being modified, and in English, this is typically determined positionally: modifiers tend to come directly before the thing being ...
Kyle Strand's user avatar
6 votes

Is there a difference between "Who necessarily do not exist" or "who do not exist necessarily"?

The modality referred to is occasioned by the adverb necessarily. Apparently, Eco is considering two different statements, where the negation either does not, or does, span the modality, respectively: ...
anemone's user avatar
  • 6,216
6 votes

"currently is a ..." or "is currently a ..."

Word Choice The first hurdle in answering your question is to decide whether you should use the word at all: Caution: Use of currently, now, or presently is wordy when the verb it modifies is in ...
KarlG's user avatar
  • 28.1k
6 votes
Accepted

Position of "only" in “We 𝒐𝒏𝒍𝒚 have two possibilities”

Since only (like even, too, and also) is a word with a focussed constituent elsewhere in the sentence, its placement has to coordinate with that focus. The rule for only is that it has to go either ...
John Lawler's user avatar
5 votes

Indian English use of "only"

In India, this reference of Only has a direct relationship with the native language.. Hindi. I'm going to a particular place. In Hindi language would mean.. "Main wahin ja raha hun"..which ...
Misti's user avatar
  • 13.7k
5 votes

Adverb placement: Obviously and Definitely

I'm assuming the adverbs have to go in that respective order in those clauses. Adverbs are complicated in English. They perform a variety of functions. I won't go into details about the various ...
Jangari's user avatar
  • 284
5 votes
Accepted

Place the adverb before or after "to"?

This depends on how formal you wish to be. By the content it sounds like you wish to be relatively formal. The construction ''to identify'' is an infinitive in English. Traditional orthodoxy has it ...
Marmitrob's user avatar
  • 415
5 votes

Why can you say “not only will I” but not “not only I will”?

When a negative phrase like not only is moved from its usual position after the first auxiliary verb (or before the main verb if there's no auxiliary) to the beginning of the sentence (usually to ...
John Lawler's user avatar
5 votes

Herewith versus herein. In this situation, is one or the other more grammatically correct and/or sense correct?

If you want your comment to mean in this document (though you probably mean in this post/in this OP?), then use herein, which is an abbreviation of in this. (see M-W) Herewith is more about attaching ...
fev's user avatar
  • 33k
4 votes

Indian English use of "only"

In almost all the cases you can use 'just'. We are just getting that printed Adds emphasis. But avoid putting 'just' near 'that' unless you intend to imply specificity rather than mere emphasis. We ...
jobermark's user avatar
  • 602
4 votes
Accepted

Adverb placement, before or after the verb

"Legitimately" is a moral adverb (Zeno Vendler's term), which modifies a verb phrase. It comes either before or after the verb phrase it modifies. One of your alternative placements leads to an ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 17.3k
4 votes

Position of adverbs

Frequency adverbs are placed before an action verb, after the be verb, before or after the auxiliary of the action verb, and at the beginning of a sentence. The adverb "still" is placed ...
Lara's user avatar
  • 159
4 votes
Accepted

Why is "He climbed the mountain up" incorrect?

Short answer The Original Poster is 100% absolutely correct that if up was an adverb functioning as an Adjunct (read Adverbial), it should be able to come after the Direct Object. However, it is not ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

"I decided just to go away", "I decided to just go away", "I just decided to go away"?

I assume that in your stated meaning you're using "just" to mean really; absolutely (used for emphasis). In which case the first or second ones are both grammatically correct and the best fit, the ...
John Clifford's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What's the meaning of "You better take this"?

"You better take this" is a common colloquial form of "You'd better take this", i.e. "You had better take this". "Had better" is an idiom which functions as a modal auxiliary, meaning something like "...
Colin Fine's user avatar
3 votes

Does the position of the adverb in a sentence change anything?

When "quickly" comes before the verb, it is a sentence adverb, and it means that only a small interval of time passed between some past reference time and the event of you eating the sandwich. When "...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 17.3k
3 votes

"It really doesn't matter" v "It doesn't really matter"

In sentence #1, really modifies "doesn't matter". In sentence #2, really modifies "matter". EDIT Both can be seen as an answer to the wh-question "Does it matter?". Sentence #1 means: it doesn't ...
Soha Farhin Pine's user avatar
3 votes

Can I use "afoot" instead of "on foot" here? "I will go to market on foot."

You'd probably be misunderstood, because "afoot" is more commonly used to mean, as Chambers dictionary puts it "actively in existence". The original sense of "on foot" ...
Rosie F's user avatar
  • 4,989
3 votes

"... respectively are ..." vs "... are respectively ..."

Using respectively at the end of the sentence is the normal structure: "Figures 1 to 3 are front, top and bottom views of the object, respectively." However, respectively can be placed ...
Kris's user avatar
  • 37.3k
3 votes
Accepted

Is there a word for near the tip of an object?

Proximal is nearest to the point of attachment and distal is furthest away. So in this diagram you could describe the proximal and distal component Alternatively, you could say subdistal as as meaning ...
samdawe's user avatar
  • 62
3 votes
Accepted

"Even more worth reading" v "worth reading even more"

Aza on Literature, worth reading, predates other events; later wrote an update that's even more worth reading. Aza on Literature, worth reading, predates other events; later wrote an update that's ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Can be <verb> arbitrarily vs Can arbitrarily be <verb>

In this case, the positioning of the adverb makes a significant difference to what is modified, and the polyseme involved. Using the adverb after the main verb Data can be arranged arbitrarily ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Can fastly be preferred over using "fast" just after any subject?

The trouble with multiple choice questions with right/wrong answers, is that the questions themselves can be fallible, as, I think, in this case. First, there is no such adverb as fastly (in the sense ...
Tuffy's user avatar
  • 11.1k
2 votes

Dangling or Misplaced Modifiers: the use of adverbs

The sentences (1) I scarcely earn fifty dollars a week. and (2) I earn scarcely fifty dollars a week. both sound correct to me, but with slightly different emphases. In sentence (1), scarcely ...
Peter Olson's user avatar
  • 6,101

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