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25 votes

'The Kukhtarev's model' or 'Kukhtarev's model' ('John's car' or 'The John's car')?

In short: The supervisor's edit is ungrammatical because it uses two Determiners within the same immediate noun phrase. As shown below, this is ungrammatical in modern English: *the my car The full ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
21 votes
Accepted

Is the signature of a letter a subject or an object?

The default pronoun to use in English is the objective case. See this EL&U.SE answer. For example, if you were to label a picture, you would label it "me at the beach in 2011" and not "I at the ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
19 votes

'The Kukhtarev's model' or 'Kukhtarev's model' ('John's car' or 'The John's car')?

Short answer - you are right, your supervisor is wrong. However he could have said "Here, we will use the Kukhtarev model to describe the ..." The possessive is not used in this version. So it'...
Peter Jennings's user avatar
19 votes
Accepted

Should I use "her" or "she"?

"But" functions as both a conjunction and a preposition. If you look at "but" as a conjunction, it leads to that other sentence -- "she does not like you". But if you look at "but" as a preposition, ...
Isabel Archer's user avatar
16 votes

Help Fixing Yoda-like Sentence Structure?

I don’t think there is anything wrong with either sentence for each number, honestly. Both pairs are grammatical, although for the second pair the meaning is slightly different because in the first ...
meepyer's user avatar
  • 708
15 votes

"Wish" in the Passive

“He is wished to be here” is marginally grammatical, but in practise very unlikely. Although he may be cast in the “object” case with an infinitival complement (I wish him to ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
14 votes

Identifying the subject: Should ‘who’ or ‘whom’ be used here?

The relevant portion of the linked article is sloppily written. It is correct to say that "whom" is ungrammatical in these sentences: He is demanding £5,000 from the elderly woman who has ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.1k
12 votes

If someone calls something by a wrong name, what are they actually referring to?

We need to think about the speaker and listener in all communications, and bear in mind that all communication requires inference on the part of the listener, in order to correctly interpret what the ...
Max Williams's user avatar
  • 23.1k
8 votes

"Whomever" as both object and subject

It’s the clause as a whole (whoever keeps working on this) that is the object. Whoever is the subject of that clause. So it should be whoever, not whomever.
Xanne's user avatar
  • 15.5k
7 votes

"There is to be no drinking beer today" What is the status of "no" and "beer" here?

I'd say that 1-4 are hybrid constructions where "no" is a determinative functioning as a determiner in construction with a gerund-participial VP head. In 1. and 4. the post head NPs are objects, but ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 13.4k
7 votes

If someone calls something by a wrong name, what are they actually referring to?

So the question is, if someone says "panda bear", what are they referring to? Well, they are referring to either a panda or a bear, unless it is something else entirely. The technical term for the ...
Mick's user avatar
  • 9,420
7 votes

Is the signature of a letter a subject or an object?

I don't think signing a letter with a personal pronoun fits into the conventional format of a letter. As such, I don't think this question is really answerable. You can do whatever you want; you're ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.1k
7 votes

Help Fixing Yoda-like Sentence Structure?

The second example is perfectly fine. What you are afraid of is ending a sentence/clause with a preposition, for, which is actually not wrong at all. Perhaps, in a very formal context, one would avoid ...
Cerberus - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
6 votes

Was it common in Shakespeare's time for adverbial phrases and objects to precede the verb in spoken English?

One important factor is that Shakespeare usually wrote in iambic pentameter. This tells where the stress falls on the words. The rhythm is often described as de DUM dee DUM. I could write it in music ...
chasly - supports Monica's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

What Is 'Given' Information according to the 'Given-before-New' Principle?

The relevant concepts are discourse-new and discourse-old (or "familiar" — or "given") information. Old information in understood as anything that is familiar in a given discourse. ...
Christopher Ford's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Is it best to use height or length associated to width for describing a 2D object?

Width × Height is standard for programming and markup languages, which is probably why you found it in your Adobe software. Examples include: HTML img and Canvas CSS Java Rectangle C++ Rectangle (...
David's user avatar
  • 12.9k
4 votes

Is the "-ee" suffix changing in meaning?

The dilution you are seeing is not a new set of uses in slightly different circumstances, but rather you're recognizing that the consistent usage always had a broader meaning reflecting the original ...
Mitch's user avatar
  • 71.8k
4 votes
Accepted

"SALLY had been the first one to greet PAULINA when SHE appeared in the doorway" Pronouns

There are grammatical restrictions on the use of pronouns when they occur within the same sentence as co-referential noun phrases. A pronoun can co-refer with another normal noun phrase if either: it ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
4 votes

Participial Phrases As Objective Complement

Leonardo drew many pictures showing birds in flight. I would definitely consider the participial phrase starting with "showing..." in this sentence to be an adjunct of the object rather than a ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes

Meaning of "Peron" as used in Le Morte d'Arthur

Supplementing ab2's answer: from context, it would be the stone of the tomb of Lanceor and Colombe: And by the craft of Merlin he made to inter this knight, Lanceor, and his lady, Colombe, under ...
Davo's user avatar
  • 7,245
4 votes

What object am I referring to in this sentence?

The "one" refers to "a beautiful image" for the reason stated above - "with a ray tracer" adds information in a prepositional phrase, and is neither an object or subject here. But it still adds ...
djaneb's user avatar
  • 51
4 votes

If someone calls something by a wrong name, what are they actually referring to?

"A rose by any other name would smell as sweet" except, perhaps, to a pedant. The assignation of a name to anything, concrete or abstract, is a social contract. As educated elites, experts certainly ...
KarlG's user avatar
  • 28.2k
4 votes

If someone pleads guilty to a crime, can they be described as "convicted"?

To put it simply, is "John plead guilty" synonymous with "John was convicted"? No. The court convicts John. John doesn't convict himself. John would still be the defendant or the accused. A ...
Gulliver's user avatar
  • 749
4 votes

Identifying the subject: Should ‘who’ or ‘whom’ be used here?

"He is demanding £5,000 from the elderly woman wh?? has ruined his life." The confusion is because "elderly woman" is the [indirect] object in the first half, and the subject of the second. As a ...
Bloke Down The Pub's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Help Fixing Yoda-like Sentence Structure?

Firstly, I'd say that there isn't anything particularly Yoda-like in your examples. Both sentences follow the standard-English [Subject][Verb][Object] ordering rather than a Yoda-like [O][S][V] ...
DotCounter's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What is the function of "their way" in "they went their way"?

And they that were sent went their way, and found even as he had said unto them. I don't see any reason why the NP "their way" should not be considered direct object of "went".
BillJ's user avatar
  • 13.4k
4 votes

What is the object in the sentence "my sister and her work together"

No, "together" does not change it. If the desired sentence is My sister works with her you should say that. The correct sentence is My sister and she work together although, actually, I ...
Mary's user avatar
  • 4,084
4 votes

What is the object of this sentence?

The main clause has three elements: Lily's parents - subject (noun phrase) were - predicator (verb) wrong about Mrs. Plank - subject-oriented predicative complement (adjective phrase) The adjective ...
DW256's user avatar
  • 9,509
3 votes

Participial Phrases As Objective Complement

Simplified Tree Diagram (NP Object with Clausal Modifier) The object in full is "many pictures showing birds in flight". The gerund-participial clause is a modifier in the NP Object. Such clauses are ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 13.4k
3 votes
Accepted

What object am I referring to in this sentence?

As a native speaker, my first interpretation is that one refers to beautiful image. It was only the disconnect between "implenting" and "image" that made me stop and reconsider. The reason is that ...
Roger Sinasohn's user avatar

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