Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
10

He is charged with murder. Here with murder should be classed as complement. The reason is that the preposition with seems to depend on the verb. Compare this with: charged on Monday charged at 11am charged by the police Here the different prepositional phrases we observe can occur freely with a wide range of sentences. There is no sense in which the on ...


5

It formed inside him an ambition to teach his students all the more. It formed an ambition to teach his students all the more inside him. He kept in the book bag an apple. (awkward or marked) He kept an apple in the book bag. The differing acceptability of these examples is due to a phenomenon known as HEAVY NOUN PHRASE SHIFT. It gives us the ...


5

Short answer Raw here is a Predicative Adjunct. It is an adjective and not an adverb because it is describing the noun phrase, garlic. Predicative Adjuncts are very often adjectives. They're almost never adverbs. Longer answer Verbs set up slots for different types of phrase. The number of slots depends on the individual verb. All verbs set up a slot for ...


4

The problem is that walk may take an adverb: They started to walk quickly. So it attracts the modifier soon, which properly goes with started. As you figured out, the way to get soon to modify the start and not the walk is to move the adverb closer to the verb it should modify and away from the verb it shouldn't.


4

Collins Cobuild term verbs such as be, remain, look, and turn link verbs, some of which take an 'adjective complement'. Certainly, Her teeth were etc need some form of completer. A snag is that one can't really sensibly separate syntax and semantics here. Be in this usage is certainly just a placeholder, whilst turn has added semantic content (as well as ...


3

Let's examine your first example a little more closely: [1a] Put the cheese back on the table. You point out that we can omit the prepositional phrase to get a perfectly sensible command to someone pilfering cheese: [1b] Put the cheese back. We can't omit the adverb in 1b because [1c] *Put the cheese is ungrammatical. The ...


3

Short answer If the phrase that is being fronted is a Complement of the verb, then it is often best to use Subject-dependent inversion, and if you don't your sentence may sound ungrammatical. If the fronted element is an Adjunct instead of a Complement, the inversion is not necessary. It will generally not give good results if the phrase that has been ...


2

" she bored them all stupid" "stupid" modifies the object "them" so I would call it an object complement or if you want "a predicative complement modifying the object". Much longer.


2

At breakfast on Thursday she bored them all stupid with flying tips she'd gotten out of a library book called Quidditch Through the Ages. I guess that one possible name for stupid is a "resultative secondary predicate". A resultative secondary predicate describes what state the verb's argument has assumed as a result of the event expressed by the verb: ...


2

As Em1 notes in the comments: She is the subject and is necessary. bore is the verb and part of the predicate and is necessary. It's transitive and requires an direct object: them all. So, all you need is: "She bored them all". Stupid is part of the predicate "to bore (so) stupid" but doesn't add any value. Using the classifications noted on Wikipedia, "...


2

Conventional grammar calls it an object complement here ("a complement (belonging) to the object"). I pried it open. I pried it half-open. I pried it loose. The adjective open can be replaced with other adjectives, and it describes a (resultative) property of the object; it is therefore an object complement. It is of the same pattern as I cut ...


2

I would call white in that case a modicative adjunct, for it describes the state brought about by the verb. That also answers your second question. There are many examples of this pattern, creeping even into formulaic phrases. He stood dumb at the bar. Usually they are employed in descriptions of a literary nature, as in your example. The bones ...


2

In your example, He talked about me in a hateful way. "in a hateful way" modifies the verb phrase "talked about me", and the result of the modification is a verb phrase "talked about me in a hurtful way". All modifiers are like this -- they are added to a phrase of some certain syntactic type, and give as result another phrase of that same type, but ...


2

I call the overuse of commas "comma-bundant." That's only one problem. The other problem is poor sentence structure (like "Throw daddy down the steps his hat"). The Jane running sentence? I would use this: Jane was concerned she might get mugged when she was running by herself. The attitude sentence? I would use this: We knew we were bound to fail unless ...


2

There is absolutely no grammatical reason to avoid starting a sentence with these adverbial phrases: as I noted in my comment above, all of your query sentences are well-formed and idiomatic. Stylistically speaking, such phrases are useful devices for creating a context for the subsequent description that is a little more sophisticated and nuanced than the ...


2

There was always a huge quantity of food left over at [the end of the day]. The phrase the end of the day is a noun phrase. The Head noun in the noun phrase is the word end. It is functioning as the Complement of the preposition at. Some people would describe this as the end of the day being the object of the preposition at. Just in case the question was ...


1

At the very least you'd need to hyphenate, like this: your-level English. This would arguably be understood by most native speakers to mean English of your level. But I doubt any native speaker would actually use such a construction under normal circumstances; it's just not natural. It is true that there are similar constructions that are fully idiomatic, ...


1

Depending on the surrounding text, the meaning should become clear. (My personal impression, hearing it completely on its own, is that pretty is the adjective and egg box is the noun—but it certainly doesn't need to be interpreted that way.) I expect that if the term pretty egg box were found within several sentences, it would become obvious if it was ...


1

I have your difficulty, also. An old proposal from 1966 by Lakoff and Ross, Criterion for verb phrase constituency, may be helpful. They propose that when a phrase can be anaphorically replaced by "do so", it can be identified as a verb phrase. Since we assume that arguments after the verb are always part of the verb phrase, but adjuncts needn't be, if ...


1

The clause that justice might be done is an adverbial adjunct modifying the verb bring, and giving the reason for or the expected result of the verb's action. I.e., it answers the question why bring the action?


1

To answer your question simply, your two examples are ungrammatical and also semantically incompatible internally. So is the the infamous example given on page 144 of CGEL. I know this is quite an assertion, so I will try to explain. We need to invoke Reichenbach for this, specifically his primitives. Simply put, tenses can be seen as a relationship between ...


1

Technically speaking the correct answer for both, if you are going to use commas, would be option 3. Imagine that the dependent clause 'running by herself' was in parenthesis - essentially what you are doing by transplanting it to the middle of a sentence - and treat it in the same way. You need to both open and close the 'parenthetical' information. Option ...


1

It sounds fine, to me. I think it's from Two more girls who think that Dallas is quite rude appear in the film. by, first, preposing the locative: In the film, two more girls who think that Dallas is quite rude appear. then Ross's Heavy NP Shift, which moves to the end the heavy NP "two more girls who think that Dallas is quite rude" (see Heavy NP ...


1

No. The sentence *In the film, appear two more girls who think that Dallas is quite rude. is ungrammatical. That's the way German does it, all right, but not English. Subject-Verb inversion is rare in English; we have Subject-Auxiliary inversion instead. First, if a verb appears before the subject, it must be an auxiliary verb, not a main verb. ...


1

What your example means is "Garlic can be eaten when it is raw". So maybe that is what happens -- we optionally delete "when it is".


1

"Was that a good thing or a bad thing?" "Certainly, that was a good thing." but "Was this or that (or both) a good thing?" Certainly that was a good thing.


1

Adjuncts, which are a very broad set of things, can modify any part of speech. I've never heard that adjuncts "always" modify nouns. Regarding "limitation": You aren't limited by any rule that says "you can only use X number of consecutive adjuncts", but you're limited by practicality. Once you start adding so many, obviously it becomes irritating for the ...


1

You'd be better off saying "It formed in him . . ." rather than "It formed inside him . . ." "He kept in the book bag an apple" sounds as though you just got off the boat from Germany. (Or maybe off the train from somewhere in rural Pennsylvania. You know, as in "Throw Mama from the train a kiss.") You have two choices with that sentence. If you're focusing ...


1

"Eager readers" is simply the object of the prepositional phrase "to the author's eager readers." I would say that both that phrase, and the adverb "immediately" are adjuncts. Neither is necessary for the sentence to be grammatically complete.


1

Yes, that's the correct interpretation. "Stupid" is an adjunct, since the example sentence without it is acceptable and has a meaning which is a part of the meaning of the sentence with "stupid". "Stupid" is predicated of "them all", so it is predicative. Since it is an adjunct and is predicative, it is a predicative adjunct.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible