Questions tagged [southern-white-vernacular-english]

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2 votes
0 answers
60 views

American English region where "here" is pronounced "cheer"

On the Andy Griffith Show the characters from Mayberry (modeled on Mount Airy NC) pronounce "here" as "cheer". This can be heard at second 29 of Andy Griffith Football Story from ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Unusual usage of the word of? What might be the source? [duplicate]

I used to live in Southern Illinois, and being a Northerner by birth, I encountered what I thought was odd, word usage by the locals. They used the phrase "of a morning" instead of "in ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
72 views

Does General American English have the evidential predicates "think", "believe", "guess", "reckon", or "have the feeling"?

It's a feature of Southern American English, but does General American English have this feature? Eg: I have the feeling I'm going to go. I guess I'm going to go. I think I'm going to go. I believe I'...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
189 views

Why do Christians in American deep south say "whenever" when they mean "when"?

As a midwestern American (Iowa), I want to understand the history, reason, and mechanics of why southern Americans say "whenever" when the word "when" would suffice. For instance: ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
51 views

Why do southern evangelical Christians in American churches say "how that" instead of how?

Why do evangelical Christians in American churches say "how that" instead of how? Ex. 1: Let me tell you a story about Billy Beaumont and how that, for our sakes, he joined the war to fight ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
93 views

What is the origin of the phrase "eating on"?

My husband's family uses the phrase "eating on" as in "we have been eating on these leftovers for several days." This isn't a phrase my family uses, and honestly, I find it evokes ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
626 views

Why do Southerners pronounce "naked" differently?

I was watching a TV show and this guy from Tennessee pronounces naked as /'nekɪd/, without the diphthong /eɪ/ in the first syllable, and instead pronounced as a single /e/ vowel. Dictionary ...
user avatar
  • 39
0 votes
1 answer
67 views

What does "done wore out one" refer to in casual Southern US American?

In the highly racist and despicable, although humorous, song "Alabama n-word", apparently from the 1960s in the Southern USA, at 1:30 into the song, the lyrics go like this: I'm glad this ...
user avatar
7 votes
4 answers
3k views

Does hillbilly slang fall under a type of English language and if not, what is it called?

Does hillbilly slang (for lack of better words) fall under a type of English language and if not, what is it referred to as, if anything? Such as: Ch'out!= combo of "watch out!" combined. y'...
user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
347 views

What is the origin of the use by Texans of "them" to mean one person?

I have always wondered about a use of the pronoun "them" that is characteristic of many Texans, and would like to know if it has been documented by linguists and, perhaps, had its origins explained. ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

"I'm Marsh Turner called."

From the movie Cross Creek, set in 1920s' Florida. Marsh: I'm Marsh Turner called. This is my daughter Ellie. The syntax of this line (as opposed to the standard "I am called Marsh Turner") ...
user avatar
  • 1,065
1 vote
2 answers
174 views

Is it "bad" to try and learn southern American English? [closed]

I have always been really interested in south American life style, culture, and specially language, a while back, I asked a professional American English teacher, about if it was OK to try and learn ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
1k views

...Your baby gonna come out naked

I heard this in a casual how-to video. It seemed random and not associated with anything they were doing. Someone said, "My favorite one is... your baby is going to come out naked. If you keep working ...
user avatar
  • 111
19 votes
1 answer
2k views

Southern Dialect: Word for a time of day?

I remember reading a story somewhere that a Southerner wrote about one of his life experiences. He mentioned that in the region he lived there was a time of day that cooled off a large amount in less ...
user avatar
  • 199
5 votes
5 answers
14k views

How does "A hit dog will holler" work as a metaphor?

Background: I, an Australian, once had a co-worker in North Carolina who would often use Southern-US idioms that confused me. I spent an evening panicked about how to handle "This dog will hunt" as ...
user avatar
  • 3,215
2 votes
1 answer
15k views

Is "in the essence of time" legitimate? Standard? Regional?

I had never heard "in the essence of time" before a recent trip to Virginia. Various local attendees of a meeting I attended used the phrase to justify moving on to a new topic, in a situation where I ...
user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
4k views

When was "fo' sho'" first used in print, television, or music? Or, better yet, when was it standard southern slang?

I can only seem to find Urban Dictionary, et al. references, so I'm turning here for an answer. I know that "fo" ("for") and "sho" ("sure") are common southern dialect replacements, but a debate ...
user avatar
  • 151
27 votes
2 answers
2k views

"It is" used as "there is": what is the origin?

Ok, this is a somewhat nonstandard English question. In the Southern US, or at least in Central Virginia, there is an idiomatic use of the phrase it is that is equivalent to the expression there is, ...
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
4k views

Does John Fogerty Talk Southern?

What is it that makes people think, erroneously, that Creedence Clearwater Revival are from the South? Is it something in the way the singer John Fogerty pronounces? In fact he's from California and ...
user avatar
  • 2,875
1 vote
2 answers
303 views

"Have [something] to allow," where to allow means to say

My mother routinely uses the phrase have to allow as a synonym for "have to say," generally in a context like, What did she have to allow? to request that her interlocutor summarize a conversation....
user avatar