Questions tagged [phonetics]

Phonetics (pronounced /fəˈnɛtɪks/, from the Greek: φωνή, phōnē, 'sound, voice') is a branch of linguistics that comprises the study of the sounds of human speech, or—in the case of sign languages—the equivalent aspects of sign.

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74 views

/ʃ/ or /s/ with the termination -ciate? Both realizations occur, but when?

I have noticed that among the several words that have the termination -ciate (or derivatives of these) sometimes the pronunciation of the 'c' is /ʃ/ and sometimes /s/. That is, sometimes ...
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how is /p/ pronunced in responsibility [duplicate]

In Cambridge dictionary, the pronunciation of responsibility is /rɪˌspɑːn.səˈbɪl.ə.t̬i/, but I am pretty sure p is not pronounced /p/, at least not the same way as /p/ in peach. So what is happening ...
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29 views

Pronunciation of /jɪr/ and /i:r/ in American accent

In American accent, is /jɪr/ and /i:r/ pronounced the same? I'm also wondering whether or not we could replace /ɪ/ by /i:/ in the first transcription so it becomes /ji:r/?
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Pronunciation of seer. Is the CMU dictionary wrong

I was looking at how "eer" is usually pronounced and I used the CMU pronouncing dictionary (American accent). I saw that most of the time (around 95%) "ee" before "r" is ...
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130 views

What sound do non-native speakers tend to produce when they mispronounce /f/ and/or /v/ in English? [closed]

In other words, when someone natively speaks a language that doesn't include /f/ or /v/, and they try to pronounce those sounds in English but don't entirely succeed, what sound do they end up ...
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50 views

Enforce NOT to pronounce sh in a word

I have a word in the Arabic language that is transliterated into Mushib in English. It means Verbose. I need to enforce the pronunciation of this word to be Mus-Hib (Without pronouncing the sh sound) ...
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1answer
84 views

How would you transcribe and/or describe this vowel?

I'm analyzing the /æ/ vowel sound (also known as 'short A') found in words like cat, dad, or man. I am particularly interested in how that sound is realized in different dialects of American English ...
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3answers
216 views

Why don't we double the final consonant in the word cooking

SO here is the rule I find about doubling consonant if a word ends with a short vowel sound plus a consonant, and the stress is on the last syllable, then the final consonant is doubled if you add ...
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What is the correct pronunciation of “elytra”?

The word elytra refers to one of the anterior wings in beetles and some other insects that serve to protect the posterior pair of functional wings according to Merriam-Webster. The word is also ...
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Why do some words with similar meanings sound similar as well?

I just noticed while writing a few examples of similar words that uncannily sound like each other phonetically. Examples: An example is the similar words: “gleaming”, “glittering”, “glinting”, and “...
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Solve and resolve pronunciation

Solve starts with /s/ sound and when a prefix re- is added to it, it is pronounced with /z/ sound. Why does it happen? Solve -> /sɒlv/ Resolve -> /rɪˈzɒlv/
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What is the difference between /a/ and /æ/?

I don't quite understand the difference between /a/ and /æ/. Google gives the transcription for 'add' as /ad/, while Wiktionary returns /æd/. Are these sounds actually distinct or is this just two ...
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Is /l/ in “whole” dark or clear?

Is /l/ in 'whole' dark or clear? I know that a clear (palatalised) /l/ is in a prevocalic position; nonetheless, I also know that the dark /l/ (velarised) is usually at the end of words.
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Do native speakers palatalize these sounds

Do native speakers palatalize sounds like /t/ in front of /ɜ/ and /ɝ/ turn /tɝn/ torn /tɔɹn/ Is /t/ here the same sound?
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What is the difference between /ʊ/ and /ʌ/ in British English?

/ʌ/ cut, hut, bun, nothing, love, enough, flood, does /ʊ/ put, soot, foot, good, look, cook To me the ʌ is a more short, low front (unrounded?) vowel, but the vowel /ʊ/ which sounds like "uh" is a ...
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3answers
89 views

How is the 'ng' in any word pronounced?

I am familiar with the phonetic sound of 'ng' together ( I am sorry I don't have a phonetic keyboard) and that there is a special way to pronounce it but some, including me, pronounce both letters and ...
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81 views

How to choose between strong /biː/ and weak /bi/ in english?

I am wondering in which context people stress the "be" in English grammar. Both wiktionary and wordrefence have a weak and a strong form in their dictionary : https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/be#...
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Sound 'r' in English

Below you see a clip from the movie "Clockwork Orange". Starting from 2:00 we hear how an officer speaks: he pronounced sound 'r' in an unusual way: vary close to russian sound 'р' ( e.g. 'rings' ). ...
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179 views

Pronunciation: /sɪksθ/ /t/

How do you pronounce sixth time? For example: Lionel Messi has won the Ballon d'Or for the sixth time. It's quite difficult to pronounce the /ksθ t/. Do you skip any sound in /ksθ/ /t/? If so, ...
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Do the DRESS vowel (/e/) and SQUARE vowel (/ɛː/) have the same vowel quality in contemporary RP?

I understand that the SQUARE vowel is now often realized as the long monophthong /ɛː/ instead of the traditional diphthong /eə/ in contemporary RP. Do /e/ from the DRESS vowel and /ɛː/ from the modern ...
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IPA, Accents, and dictionaries, British and American Phonetics [duplicate]

As a non native english speaker, I'm trying to work on my accent. I've taken a lot of bad habits so I'm trying to go back to the fundamentals meaning learning phonetics. But they seem very imprecise ...
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2answers
199 views

On the pronunciation of 's' in 'dislike' (/s/ vs /z/)

With a bit of a surprise I have recently learnt that most(all?) native English speakers pronounce the 's' in dislike (and similar words with the dis- prefix) as /s/, not /z/. However, the /z/ ...
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2answers
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Is there such a thing as Intrusive-L (as opposed to Intrusive-R)?

Most of us have heard plenty of examples of the so-called Intrusive-R. It is a feature of non-rhotic dialects, including British RP and some New England dialects. It occurs between two vowels that are ...
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1answer
54 views

Difference in articulation (or voiceness?) of /z/ between Ame and RP?

I have observed some differences between Americans and British people when pronouncing /z/ in almost any word. But I don't know exactly what is the difference, I would describe it as Ame /z/ being ...
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67 views

What is the most common allophone of r after θ in British English, like in [θri:]?

I ask because post-alveolar r could not be used after dental θ. My intuition tells me that it should be alveolar r, but I have not found on the Internet any confirmation for it.
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Is there a specific term for those words that are phoneticised letters of the English alphabet?

This post Phoneticised alphabet letters refers to "initialisms," a term that describes a word that has been formed by phoneticizing a set of initials that is in common usage, such as "emcee" or "...
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Do /ɪə/, /eə/, /ʊə/ diphthongs actually exist in General American as phonemes?

The Handbook of English Pronunciation. (Marnie Reed, John Levis referring to J.C. Wells) Аs the pronunciation of most speakers is rhotic, there are no centring diphthongs, because the vowels /ɪə,...
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3answers
278 views

Example words with ɛ: + difference between ɛ: and ɛ [closed]

I've just started studying phonetics and phonology of English and I'm currently trying to find words with the vowel ɛ: as examples for a homework. Also, is there a difference between ɛ: and ɛ, as in, ...
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Flapped pronunciation of / l /

I've noticed lately the flapped realization of /l/ in AmE, as in the sentence "It's solo" from the song Solo (Clean Bandit feat. Demi Lovato). What are the causes behind this pronunciation?
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180 views

Can /æ/ raising produce homophones in American English?

Can words like "bend" and "band" merge in AmEn? I always thought they should not but here's a confusing example: https://youtu.be/_C0mc7ZOMF4 To my ear this gentleman pronounces "bend" as [bɛənd] and ...
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I dont understand ‘Stressed schwa’ [duplicate]

how can a ‘stressed schwa’ exist? In ‘Applied English Phonology 3rd edition’ (page 85), ‘herder’ is the example of the stressed schwa and it is manifested as ‘3’(with r-coloring tail). As I’ve seen so ...
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233 views

'Direction' Pronunciation [duplicate]

There are two ways to pronounce the word 'direction'. dɪˈrɛkʃ(ə)n and dʌɪˈrɛkʃ(ə)n Is one American and one British? If yes, please confirm which is which. If not, what's the difference in usage?
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I am looking for a reverse API tool

I'm looking for a tool for write the sound of the word (phonetic) and have all the words that have that sound. It's very usefull when people don't use the good sounds or to know what a native speaker ...
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1answer
240 views

Happy tensing after /l/

Happy tensing is claimed by Wikipedia to occur in General American and Australian English in words like "happy", "money", "valley" etc. Here's an American lady saying "realy badly" as [ˈriɫɪ ˈbædɫɪ] ...
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Why do American speakers pronounce “the” as “/ðə/” before vowels?

I learned that we have to pronounce /ðə/ before consonants & /ði/ before vowels. For example, the /ðə/ car, but the /ði/ earth. But it seems that a lot of American people pronounce the /ðə/ ...
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1answer
322 views

The /ɪ/ sound vs the /i/ sound - exact difference?

What's the exact difference in the 'pi' sound between 'happiness' /ˈhæp.i.nəs/ and epicentre /ˈep.ɪ.sen.tər/ that prompts the Cambridge Dictionary compilers to use a diffrerent vowel code for each ...
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Is there a sentence that contains every English phoneme? [duplicate]

An example of a sentence with every letter of the alphabet is: "A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dogs." Is there an example of a sentence which contains every English phoneme? I realize accents ...
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185 views

What was the pronunciation of the a in “trap” in early to mid Modern English in the UK?

I have often read that in Old and Middle English the "a" sound in words like "trap" was pronouned /a/. When it comes to modern English, Wikipedia suggests that this was raised to /æ/ in early Modern ...
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473 views

How do people actually pronounce “Orange”?

There are questions on ELU about the phonemic transcriptions of orange in both British and American English in dictionaries. However, this being a site for linguists and all that, I thought I would ...
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4answers
303 views

English minimal pair words by syllabification [closed]

Are there English minimal pairs created by different syllabification, specifically of lexical words?
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67 views

how do you pronounce a rolling “o” as in “so” or “no”?

I noticed that in New Zealand most people pronounce "o" at the end of "no" or "so" in a rather rolled manner - something closer to [our] instead of simple [ou]. For example, lady in this video does ...
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2answers
106 views

Which diphthong takes place in 'desirous'?

The phonetic transcription for desirous (in its BrE pronunciation) can be written as [dɪˈzʌɪərəs]. I wonder which diphthong—ʌɪ or ɪə—takes place in this word? Maybe here we can see a kind of haplology?...
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1answer
149 views

What is the vowel length of rhotic schwa /ɚ/ when it occurs non-word finally?

I know that /ɚ/ is longest when it occurs at the end of a word, since it is occurring at the end of an open syllable, as in < rapture> [ræp̚tʃɚː]. What about when it occurs syllable finally in the ...
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2answers
651 views

Peculiar pronunciation of 'architecture'

Watching a footage from 1928-9 i noticed that the narrator pronounced architecture as ['a:tʃitektʃə] instead of the modern ['a:Kitektʃə]. Is this known to be the standard American pronunciation of ...
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1answer
530 views

Devoicing 'Voiced consonants' to their counterparts

So, lately I've been really interested in devoicing voiced consonants to their counterparts. I've been studying painstakingly, so I would like to share it with you, and you can tell me if you agree ...
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1answer
74 views

Phoneticised alphabet letters [duplicate]

Do all letters of the English alphabet have phoneticised dictionary entries? I'm thinking of the word Vee for the letter V or Zed for the letter Z? For example is there an entry for H? Aitch?
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1answer
625 views

Do Americans pronounce “transient” as \ˈtran(t)-sh(ē-)ənt\?

Merriam-Webster pronounces "transient" as \ˈtran(t)-sh(ē-)ənt\. However, most Americans pronounce it as \ˈtran-zē-ənt\.
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Forensic Linguistics; 'Stupid people' or 'Stupid woman' - Do we know what Jeremy Corbyn said?

In the UK, some of the debates in the Houses of Parliament are televised. On 18th December 2018, Jeremy Corbyn was filmed muttering something—which was interpreted by a Twitter user as "stupid ...
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Is it true that t&d, p&b, k&g, s&z, … only differ by voiced vs. unvoiced

According to https://www.lawlessenglish.com/learn-english/pronunciation/consonants-voiced-unvoiced/ there are number of pairs of consonant sounds whose only difference is that one is voiced and the ...
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893 views

Difference between /əʳ/ and /ɚ/

Consider the word 'future.' Cambridge Dictionary shows the transcriptions /ˈfjuːtʃəʳ/ and /ˈfjuːtʃɚ/. Are they different?

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