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Questions tagged [contractions]

A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters.

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Is “this'll” considered proper English?

I understand that certain words when used over time are then embraced into the English lexicon. Is "this'll" one of those words? Examples: This'll do. This'll stay in place. As an insert,...
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0answers
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If “I Will!” vs “I’ll!” [duplicate]

I told my friend “Enjoy your coffee.” and she answered “I’ll!” It took me a second to realise it was “I will!” Why is the first one wrong and the second version not? I know it’s wrong but I don’t ...
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1answer
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Is it wrong to use use contractions of have when not for the purpose of forming a past tense sentence? [duplicate]

For example, I believe the following to be acceptable: "I've had no issues in the past with this client" However, the following is what I'm unsure of: "I've $16 in my bank account." I've ...
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38 views

Is 'shouldn't've' grammatically and lexically correct? [duplicate]

I was watching a certain episode of Brooklyn Nine-Nine, in which a subplot revolves around a particular character's (lack of) usage of contractions, and a particular plot device occurred when the ...
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2answers
35 views

How to negate the double modal construction “might could” (and others)?

I have relatives from the southern U.S., and they often use double modal verbs in their speech, like "I might could go to the market". I understand that this isn't considered standard, but it got me ...
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0answers
43 views

The total opposite (contradiction) of Infallible

I am looking for a word that means "can do no right" Fallible is not the word I am looking for since that means "can do wrong"
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2answers
51 views

Apostrophe instead of the first sound. Where do I read about it?

What sources are there about rules for such contractions in American English when the first sound of the word isn’t pronounced. There’s an apostrophe or something like this instead. F/e, the ...
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2answers
37 views

Using brackets in quotes: You['re] vs [You're]

Quick question, if the original quote is "You are..." but I'm attempting to combine the two words, would the correct way to use brackets be: a. [You're] (entire word in bracket) b. You['re] (...
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1answer
42 views

Can I use “they'd” as in “they'd many cars”?

I'm writing a poem so perhaps it doesn't matter, but I also want to know if you'd easily understand what I mean.
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2answers
55 views

Is ‘don't do’ ungrammatical/redundant? How about ‘don't <verb>’?

‘Don't’ is a contraction of ‘do not’, and ‘do’ is a verb meaning ‘to perform/execute’. Strictly speaking, then, are these two common constructions ungrammatical? a) ‘Don't do this/that.’ Since it ...
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1answer
35 views

Contraction of would

In casual speech, can you contract "would you" to "dju" in questions like these: What'd you like to drink? What flavor'd you like?
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2answers
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Contraction “-'dn't” from formal English “would not”

Can "wouldn't" be reduced to the clitic -'dn't when attached to any other pronoun besides y'all, such as she'dn't or you'dn't? (Appearing for example in "y'all'dn't've" from formal English "you all ...
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2answers
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“do you have” pronounced [djuv] d'you've

I hear contraction d'you've from "do you have" quite often, broadly [djuv], yet google throws back no result for such a phonetic word. I'd like to know how it's orthographically represented. For ...
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2answers
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Is it me or does Grammarly have it wrong: “Your” vs “You're” [closed]

My friend and I are having a debate whether the following is wrong your saying Grammarly is wrong and your smarter. since it's the wrong your. But Grammarly seems to not pick up on it, is it ...
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1answer
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Bain't = be not

Please read the passage taken from "A Few Crusted Characters" by Thomas Hardy: According to Wiktionary, "bain't" is the contracted form of "be not" and it is a British dialect. Therefore, the ...
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1answer
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“one bottle (of) water”

I've seen a photo of a sign, from a site that I believe is a hiking route in the US, warning about extreme heat. It reads WARNING! Extreme heat Minimum 1 bottle water per person No sandals ...
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0answers
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Limitations on the creation and use of contractions

I want to start by warning anyone reading this that I am searching for a serious answer to a stupid question. I don't know if there is an answer or not, but I truly am after serious thought. My ...
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1answer
84 views

Should contractions like “'til” be capitalized in a title?

Should contractions like "'til" be capitalized in a title, when in the middle of a title? What if the "'til" is the first or last word? An example of this is the album "Dog Party - 'Til You're Mine" (...
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2answers
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British English plural verb for group noun in a contraction

I'm curious about the use of the famous British plural verb form with a group noun¹ in a contraction. The general custom for the plural is discussed here and here but those don't call out contractions....
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0answers
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Can I use contractions with any words? [closed]

I was wondering whether something like "How long've you been playing?" or "A preparation'd've helped" is correct or whether I can only use those contractions with personal pronouns...thank you for ...
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1answer
251 views

Why does the contraction “she's” mean she is or she has? [closed]

I saw this from globalnews.ca: Molly Johnson on the album she’s always wanted to make When referring to google ngram, I get 3 possible combinations of she's: She 's She's She has So my ...
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5answers
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What does “I'za” mean?

I saw this uncommon contraction a couple of days ago. The sentence read something like I'za stupid farmer boy, but know a thing or two about computers. What does the contraction really mean? Is ...
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0answers
273 views

Correct expanded contraction for I'd

I am using NLP with machine learning to expand contractions on some sentences. I the outputs I am getting a sentence that I am not sure that is right. The sentence with contraction is: I'd better ...
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1answer
107 views

Why isn’t “It’s” a complete sentence, but “It is” is? [duplicate]

I’m a native English speaker, so I understand that It’s. is not a complete sentence, whereas the sentence It is. is a complete sentence. What linguistic mechanism prevents “It’s.” from being ...
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1answer
68 views

Is there another way to write the possessive -s?

I have a question regarding the possessive. Which one of the two is correct? Caroline's car Caroline her car Or are they both correct?
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7answers
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“wanna” at the end of a sentence

I'm not a native speaker. A pupil wrote "wanna" at the end of a sentence: You can go if you wanna. It sounds odd to me, as if something had to follow wanna (as opposed to want to/ want, which ...
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1answer
429 views

Is “whom's” a valid contraction?

Who's is valid, as in Who's going? (Who is going?) So surely whom's should be valid, as in Whom's he invited? (Whom has he invited?)
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2answers
238 views

Ain't and gotta [duplicate]

I have a sentence below: You ain't gotta believe me. In this sentence, If i'm not wrong, Does ain't mean have not? and Does gotta mean got to? So, it means You have not got to believe me. I'm I ...
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1answer
50 views

“It has it's reason …” [closed]

Is this grammatically correct? It has it’s reason why it has to be happened”. Tried to check it on Google but its not there. I just need to clarify if this statement is correct for the quotation ...
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1answer
72 views

Origin of the irregular contraction of “not”

All the contractions seem to follow some sort of logic: they place the mark between the words, and leave only the part of the sound that is predominantly heard ("I will" -> "I'll", "you have" -> "you'...
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2answers
311 views

Should I use contracted forms in scientific presentations?

In a scientific paper am I right in believing that one would write “it is” instead of “it’s”? In a scientific presentation, would one use contracted forms like “it’s” instead of “it is” or is ...
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1answer
100 views

Which demographic of English speakers say “I've to” for “I have to”?

In a forum I frequent there are many times that contractions are used in a way that's unusual, and many users find to be ungrammatical: "I've to" etc. To me it's not ungrammatical but it sounds both ...
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3answers
2k views

Did Old English (Anglo-Saxon) use contractions?

German uses contractions a lot, including im (in+dem) and zum (zu+dem) to name a few. As an Old English learner, I wanted to know if there were any attested similarities. My research hereto has ...
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0answers
398 views

Is there a contraction for 'who are'?

Is who're an actual contraction of 'who are'? Are you able to contract 'who are'? Thank you.
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4answers
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Is D-glottalization a plausible explanation of ambiguity in Donald Trump interview with WSJ?

On Jan 11, The Wall Street Journal published an interview with President Trump that contained the following phrase: With that being said, President Xi has been extremely generous with what he’s ...
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1answer
94 views

“Its” or “it’s” in “Getting Over It's IMPOSSIBLE PHYSICS!” [closed]

While browsing through YouTube, I came across a video titled “Getting Over It's IMPOSSIBLE PHYSICS!” which references to a new game titled “Getting Over It with Bennett Foddy”. My question is, ...
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1answer
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Why do many authors, when narrating a dialogue taking place in another language, use no contractions in English? [closed]

I have been reading a book lately in which the entire family speaks Vietnamese, but in order for the reader to understand, the dialogue is in English. However, it is written formally, with no ...
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1answer
128 views

Negative contractions in a question

I know how negative contractions are used, and that they're all pretty straightforward in informal writing. Didn't she go to the opera with you? Weren't you a pastor before, Jacob? Can't we get ...
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1answer
2k views

When do you use “what'd you say” and when do you use “what d'you say”?

In informal writing you can say: "What'd you say" or "what d'you say?" When do you choose the former or the latter? Which one is more common?
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1answer
119 views

“'ve” contraction in Canadian and Australian English

I'm wondering if in Australian or Canadian English you can use " 've" before a noun phrase in informal style: I've a car. They've a great time. The question is somewhat related to this one. The ...
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0answers
75 views

Do an abbreviated word have to be enclosed by the apostrophe?

been searching for a while now so: When omitting parts of words with an apostrophe, do it have to be enclosed by the word? A good example that helped me answer a few of my own questions was: Using ...
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2answers
204 views

Double contraction possible with possessive noun + is?

Can one shorten, in informal writing, a phrase like “Smith’s is the best among the ones I’ve seen” to “Smith’s’s best among the ones I’ve seen”, using double ’s contraction? I myself doubt it’s ...
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1answer
90 views

Future negation with two statements using “won’t” [closed]

I have a question about future negation using won’t. So, when I have a question that contains two parts connected by and and I want to make it known that those things both will not happen. So for ...
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0answers
506 views

Is when're a proper contraction of “when are”? [closed]

I've seen that no contractions are used in formal writing. I believe "when're" tries to represent spoken casual English when it would sound like "when-er". Is "when're" ok in an informal text? For ...
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2answers
172 views

Can I use contractions on multiple nouns like this?

Can I use contractions when I want to apply them to multiple nouns? I want to say this: Sally and I will go to the beach. Can I say this? Sally and I'll go to the beach.
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1answer
853 views

Life or Life's in this quote [closed]

_______ too short for bad beer! Is it life's or Lifes? Apostrophe s means ownership,(which doesn't apply here) but life's is a contraction for life is ??? Which is correct? Please and thank you!
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3answers
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What’s the difference between “she is worked” and “she has worked”? [closed]

Sometimes she’s means she has but sometimes it means she is. How can I find the difference between these two identical sentences so that I can understand which of the two possible contractions was ...
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4answers
3k views

Why are expressions like “gonna”, “wanna” and “shoulda” American English?

As Etymonline suggests, the use of “a” meaning “have” in expressions like “should have” (shoulda), “could have” (coulda) and “would have” (woulda) were almost standard usage until the 17th century: ...
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1answer
7k views

Isn't “there're” a contraction for “there are”? [duplicate]

Aw, don't be silly. Well, I think so. So we'll say, "There're books in the library." We can also say, "We know there're not lots of foods or drinks in the library, but only books."
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so we're going to /soʊ˞ g/

in the following video (2:53) the initial part of the sentence "so we're goint to cut" is reduced to /soʊ˞ g.../. Could you confirm this? https://youtu.be/7EnWiGYT1g4