Questions tagged [variants]

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Preferred abbreviations of 'versus' according to Anglophone country? [duplicate]

I am already aware that for example BE and AE have different opinions on using periods in abbreviations. Today, I am interested in variations among English speaking countries (specifically: UK, USA, ...
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5 votes
1 answer
292 views

Origin of "the likes of which X has [or have or had] never seen"

One of Donald Trump's favorite rhetorical flourishes was (and perhaps still is) the wording "the likes of which X has [or have] never seen." While president, he used it on a number of ...
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1 vote
1 answer
115 views

Distribution of "yelp" for "yes"

I've recently come across two people online who consistently write "yelp" meaning "yes" or "yep" in chat. Due to anonymity and privacy, I don't know much about them. From ...
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17 votes
3 answers
1k views

Etymological origin and earliest recorded occurrence of 'saunter' in English

Someone just sent me a quotation from the explorer/naturalist John Muir, in which he makes the following etymological claim: Do you know the origin of that word saunter? It's a beautiful word. Away ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Rase: another spelling of raze (literary) [closed]

Is the spelling using s as opposed to z really literary as the Microsoft® Encarta® 2009 purportedly explains? Raze 1. completely destroy place: to destroy or level a building or settlement ...
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1 answer
131 views

Alternative in parenthesis before or after?

When a sentence describes there are multiple alternatives, but one specific is the common one, it can specify the common in parenthesis. But there are multiple ways to do it. For example, should it ...
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-3 votes
1 answer
777 views

Why is "make do" considered correct

Why is "make do" considered correct? I am specifically not asking why "make due" grinds people's gears, how distressing they find it, or what they feel "make do" would ...
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0 votes
2 answers
367 views

Short way of expressing alternatives

A colleague recently pointed out that my usage of "resp." in English is incorrect, and is in fact an artefact of my native language. In Czech, it abbreviates "respektive" and is used to express [...
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16 votes
2 answers
2k views

Noun form of "aver"?

It is common in legal writing to aver, meaning to allege, assert, or affirm a fact. (Latin root is adver.) But I can't find any evidence that the obvious noun form of the word, aversion, has ever ...
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2 votes
0 answers
409 views

Best practice regarding the words until, till, til, 'till, 'til and to

I often see in English the word 'till used as until. Example I'll wait 'till the end of time. Now I have found out that this may be wrong. The correct writing is without the apostrophe 'till and ...
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4 votes
2 answers
798 views

When do you use the term "Dialect"? [closed]

I've heard people use the terms: American English British English Australian English I understand that all of them are English. However, sometimes when people use them, it's almost like they refer ...
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1 answer
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Is the phrase ‘outgrow oneself’ correct?

Is it correct to write like ‘As soon as we outgrew ourself and became a capable individual, all the difficulties came roaring at us’?
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3 votes
3 answers
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"Webpages" or "Web Pages"?

Sometimes I found it written as "WebPages" and sometimes it is "Web Pages" .. I'm confused should it be written as one word or two words ?!
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2 votes
1 answer
3k views

surficial and superficial [closed]

I know that I can use surficial related to describe concepts related to the surface of the earth (or a planet)... so surficial aquifers, surficial geology, surficial deposits and so on. All the time I ...
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1 vote
0 answers
2k views

Do "multiple choice" questions always have only one correct answer?

In most dictionary definitions it seems that "multiple choice" questions actually refer to questions where only one "correct" answer among several choices is expected to be chosen (e.g. the definition ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Where does "Do you want the bill grabbing?" come from?

I heard this phrase at a restaurant the other day - in Sheffield, England. The waitress said first, "Do you want anything else getting?", and then after that, "Do you want the bill grabbing?" This ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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What is an idiomatic parallel for “read between the lines” pertaining to speech?

When a person reads between the lines, they are inferring meaning which is not explicitly represented. What is an idiomatic version of this which can apply to spoken words? Vis–à–vis something ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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Is the spelling fundraising, fund-raising or fund raising?

I have seen different spellings for fundraising and would like to know the current best practice. The history of this word/phrase is also of interest to me.
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3 votes
1 answer
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Locater vs Locator spelling [duplicate]

I can find references to each in many online dictionaries, but few will reference both of them. So the question remains: What is with the difference in spelling between "Locator" and "Locater"? Is ...
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8 votes
2 answers
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What caused bell peppers to be called capsicums in some countries?

I have read this answer on the question "Why is the word “pepper” used for both capsicum (e.g. bell pepper) and piper (e.g. black pepper)?", and it contains some useful etymological information. I've ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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What's the meaning of "finniky"?

There is this sentence in a letter of Bertrand Russell: Even the absurdities - the thunder and lightning - are big and invigorating after the stifling finniky appropriateness of everything French. ...
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56 votes
3 answers
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Retriable or retryable?

As in "it is possible to try it again". "Tryable" seems to be the one mostly used online, if you type it in Google. Onelook Dictionary Search only returns an entry for "tryable" from Wordnik, not from ...
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15 votes
3 answers
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Evaluable vs. Evaluatable

How do we describe "something that can be evaluated"? My first thought was "evaluatable", since we have inflate -> inflatable debate -> debatable equate -> equatable However, "...
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1 vote
3 answers
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How can one choose between "tunable" and "tuneable"?

Both "tunable" and "tuneable" seem to be in common usage. Is there a source which can be used to justify a preference for one or the other for general usage, possibly as a function of whether one is ...
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11 votes
3 answers
86k views

"I have strived" vs "I have striven"

In a college application essay, I am trying to write the sentence along the lines of: I have always strived to achieve my goals. Should I say strived or striven? According to this article at ...
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5 votes
1 answer
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How are English forms of Irish names used?

I've noticed that many Irish people use both their English and Irish versions of the name. For example, Moya Brennan, born Máire Ní Bhraonáin Can someone tell me what is the official status of ...
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2 votes
1 answer
4k views

Difference of hotspot versus hot spot

hot spot -vs- hotspot What's the difference between these two variants? When do I use them? An example sentence is as follows: "Biochar addition is becoming one of the hotspots in soil science." ...
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5 votes
1 answer
4k views

Thrown by 'broncho.' Or is it 'bronco'? Or 'bronc'?

Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, first edition (1908) has this entry for broncho: Broncho (brŏn´kō), n. {Sp. bronco rough, wild.} A native or a Mexican horse of small size. {Western U.S.} Four ...
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7 votes
4 answers
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Revolutioner vs Revolutionist: which is better?

Both words can be found in a dictionary and have the same meaning. My question is: is any one better than the other in any way? Is one more fitting in certain scenarios? I think revolutionist sounds ...
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6 votes
2 answers
28k views

Struck vs Stricken

Is struck or stricken correct in these sentences? The house was stricken / struck by lightning. The house had been stricken / struck by lightning. He was stricken / struck by grief, cancer, etc. ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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He stayed a week vs he stayed for a week

He stayed a week vs He stayed for a week I consider her my friend vs I consider her as my friend. I don't know whether he can be there vs I don't know if he can be there I often hear the above ...
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2 votes
1 answer
375 views

anthropomorphic vs. anthropomorphized

When is it most appropriate to use "anthropomorphic" as opposed to "anthropomorphized"? Is there any difference between the two?
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2 votes
1 answer
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Can all verbs ending in "-ise" be written with the suffix "ize"? [closed]

Are there any "-ise" (or "-yse") words which cannot be (or are never) written using "-ize"? I searched for prior questions, and came across: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/47785/correct-...
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2 votes
1 answer
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"Dream, dreamt" and "learn, learnt" irregular verbs: correct or not? [duplicate]

Often when I am writing emails or any other documents, I would like to use the irregular forms of dream (dreamt) or learn (learnt). But the computer spellcheckers always underline these words as being ...
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9 votes
3 answers
2k views

Do any words have three or more correct spellings? [closed]

I can call to mind several words with another correct spelling (colour, analogue, disc, barbeque) but I can't think of any with multiple correct spellings, i.e. three or more equally acceptable, ...
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7 votes
4 answers
27k views

To know something "inside out" or "inside and out"?

As a native English speaker (Australia) I've always known and used the expression "to know something inside out", meaning "to know thoroughly". Just now when editing a post on another SE site that ...
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3 votes
3 answers
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Is "enroute" an acceptable variant of "en route"?

Is "enroute" (without the space) an acceptable variant of "en route"?
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-1 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is it Comic Book or Comics Book? [closed]

Which one is proper Comic Book or Comics Book? Are both of them grammatically correct? If so, what is the difference between them?
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0 votes
1 answer
10k views

Are there other variations of "slow and steady wins the race"? [closed]

We know the hare and tortoise story but are there other variants of "slow and steady wins the race"?
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1 vote
1 answer
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“Bazaar” vs. “bazar”

Which of bazaar or bazar is better to use for the domain name of specialised marketplace? Both are available according to the dictionaries. Any advice which of these two is better to use in the URL?
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1 vote
4 answers
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Is it acceptable to use "womyn" or "womin" instead of "women"?

I have often seen/heard the two terms "womyn" and "womin" in many articles and speeches about feminism or women's rights issues. I couldn't find them in any online dictionary except for the Oxford ...
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23 votes
4 answers
104k views

"Smooths" versus "Smoothes"

I am interested in the rapid rise (since about 1993) in frequency of the spelling smoothes as against smooths. An Ngram Viewer graph tracking the frequency of usage of the two words from 1800 to 2005 ...
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3 votes
2 answers
488 views

"Go shut the door" or "Go and shut the door": AmE/BrE difference

The usage you put the verb (in its infinitive form) right after "go" is used in AmE but not in BrE, as I heard. For example, Go shut the door. However, I doubt this is true and want to know the ...
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10 votes
5 answers
74k views

How is 'via' pronounced and where did these variations come from? [closed]

Over the years, I've heard people say 'v-ē-ə', 'v-ī-ə', and sometimes the 'uh' is an 'ah' sound. (edit- It has come to my attention that 'via' was once a 'wee-ah' from Latin, but I don't feel like ...
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6 votes
5 answers
2k views

Which English dialects have 2nd person plural?

"Y'all" is the famous southern US form of the 2nd person plural. The Brooklyn / Italian-American "youse" might be another. While the existence and usage of "y'all" has been addressed somewhat ...
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2 votes
0 answers
5k views

Is “zzzzz” the most common spelling to represent a person sleeping? [closed]

What is the most common or correct spelling of "zzzzz"? (1)   zzzzz (5 letters)(2)   zzzz (4 letters) (3)   zzz (3 letters) My question stems from when I first wrote ...
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5 votes
4 answers
10k views

Is "blah blah blah" the most common spelling?

What is the most common or correct spelling of "blah blah blah"? blah blah blah blah blah bla bla bla bla bla My question stems from when I first wrote it as "bla bla bla" in an English text, but ...
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6 votes
2 answers
876 views

Is "proven" very old -fashioned?

I occasionally see the participle "proven" in mathematical texts, instead of "proved". Of course I realize that this a deliberate archaism, but I wanted to know if this is still used in books or ...
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0 votes
2 answers
1k views

What is the act of self-referencing?

Ok, so something can be self-referencing. "This sentence contains thirty-eight letters." or "This is not a pipe." But what is "doing that" called? Along the lines of how self-deprecating is self-...
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63 votes
7 answers
164k views

What is the difference between dialogue and dialog?

I am American, and I always thought the difference between dialogue and dialog was one of meaning, the way Merriam-Webster has them listed: 2 entries found: dialogue (noun) dialog box (noun) ...
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