Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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1

I would suggest that the etymology related to Latin trādĕre is unlikely because of how the word trade developed within the English language and its more immediate precursors. Trādĕre translates roughly as To hand over, surrender On the other hand, the earliest definitions of trade as used in English relate not to the exchange of goods, but to paths and ...


2

You're right, the term 'affine' is a little abstruse. I think deadrat's answer is about as good as you will get as to how the etymology of the term might be related to the concept. As to an origin, a mathematical term 'affine' is defined in connection with tangents to curves in Euler's "Introductio in analysin infinitorum" of 1748, Book II, Ch. XVIII, art....


7

There's an etymology from Latin 'delere' to 'delir' in Old French and Occitan, which means 'to destroy'. So the assumption of only English inheriting this word is faulty. See for example Past Participles from Latin to Romance, page 225. Of course, you could argue that no modern Romance language has this word. But there are etymological descendants, with ...


3

The OED's earliest citation (which it admits may be questionable and isn't included in other etymologies that I've looked at) is from 1495 from a translation of Bartholomeus Anglicus's De proprietatibus rerum, a translation of a Latin text into English (they don't list the translator): "1495 Barth. De P.R. (W. de W.) iv. iii. 82 Drinesse dystroyeth bodyes ...


14

delete "destroy, eradicate," 1530s, from Latin deletus, past participle of delere "destroy, blot out, efface," from delevi, originally perfective tense of delinere "to daub, erase by smudging" (as of the wax on a writing table), from de "from, away" (see de-) + linere "to smear, wipe," from PIE root *(s)lei- "slime, slimy, sticky" (see slime (n.)). In ...


0

While a good question, I think none of the answers here provide an adequate answer. 'Status quo' does not describe an object that would be calculable. The closest translation of the term is "the existing state of affairs", or -- by simplification -- "the way things are". There is no meaningful way to pluralize the context or the meaning of this phrase, in ...


8

Here's the listing in Old English Translator for offrian: offrian | weak class 2 to offer Verbs in Old English often form their infinitive with -an, an inflection that degraded to -en or -e in Middle English and disappeared in Modern English. More specifically, Offrian is a weak verb, class 2, which often form their infinitives with -ian (...


0

Cactus cacti, alumnus alumni, locus loci, fungus fungi, stimulus stimuli.. but H. Plyorus H. Pylori (pronounced pyloree)


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