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What is the difference between the following sentences? 1 The body has additional vibration velocity. vs. 2 The body has an additional vibration velocity. It is perhaps easiest to discard the adjectives: 1 The body has velocity. -> the body possesses the abstract attributes of speed and direction. Here, we are saying that the body possesses speed and ...


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Employment / acceptance of an indefinite article isn't a good test for a count usage. 'She has a working knowledge of Spanish'. 7 working knowledges? Here, though, the second sentence means 'The body has, in addition, vibration[al] velocity.' Just as a body may possess kinetic energy of translation, KE of rotation, and, in addition, KE of vibration, ...


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The OP is looking for a singular, uncountable noun that is not a mass noun. Unfortunately, this is rather like looking for an invisible unicorn that is green. The idea of “uncountability” in nouns is an attribute that can be given to the noun and not a permanent state. “Uncountable” is used to express the meaning of a discrete and infinite set of homogenous ...


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OALD {adjusted} has (perhaps wisely, but not over-helpfully) departure noun ​ [countable, uncountable] 1 an act of leaving a place a His sudden departure threw the office into chaos. b rumours of her imminent/impending departure c departure from… They had received no news of him since his departure from the island. d departure ...


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There is some disagreement between dictionaries about whether the noun "departure" can be uncountable or not. Cambridge says it is countable, Mirriam-Webster doesn't say (which I assume means it defaults to countable). Only Wiktionary and Oxford learners say it can be uncountable. The only example I can find in the dictionaries that would seem be fit '...


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