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Recent news events in the US have resulted in many headlines about "nude photos of young women" and variations. [W]hy does this phrasing persist? Quoting (adding emphasis) from Joseph Henrich's 2016 book, The Secret of Our Success: How Culture Is Driving Human Evolution, Domesticating Our Species, and Making Us Smarter: from p. 231: [L]anguages ...


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It happens fairly often in English that an adjective is "transferred" from one subject to another, even when it doesn't strictly speaking apply to the latter, provided it is still relevant (in some sense) to the latter. This often begins as a mild figure of speech — see https://www.thoughtco.com/transferred-epithet-1692558 for various examples — ...


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It's often the case when describing containers that we use adjectives that describe their contents rather than their own intrinsic properties. (containers isn't a technical term but it fit the concept). For example a physics textbook isn't physics, rather the contents describe knowledge we have on the field of physics your family photos aren't related to ...


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From the OED, bold emphasis mine: nude A3c. (adj) Of a work of art, form of entertainment, etc.: involving or portraying one or more naked or scantily clad people; performed without clothing. Also of an actor or model: that performs or poses unclothed. 1869 D. N. Camp Amer. Year-bk. I. 791 Her charms, so freely exhibited on the stage at ...


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Testing this out against my native speaker's understanding, I think there is a general pattern here. It may be relatively new, but I can't remember any time when I would not have understood it or might have been told off by an older person for abusing the language. The pattern is that " photo", often means "photo depicting a " (or s plural). Tree photos. ...


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Collocations modifying photo often don't refer to the photo as a physical object. They instead refer to the subject of the photo, or what's depicted in the image. To demonstrate this, here are the most common collocations for ____ photo according to the Corpus of Contemporary American English. I have bolded the ones that describe the image (source, subject,...


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Nude photos is a noun phrase that has become idiomatic and manifests in slang such as "nudies" or simply "nudes". The phrase "nude photos of X" does indeed seem like a retro-construction. This phrasing is also more euphemistic or neutral, perhaps, since as you mentioned, technically, it would be "X" who is nude, but "X" is not the grammatical subject (it is ...


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It’s a way to refer to photos with nude subjects. As you can see from Ngram this expression took off from the ‘60s/70s when pictures portraying nude people, generally women, started to become popular; the same expression was used earlier referring to paintings Nude: (of a photograph, painting, statue, etc.) being or prominently displaying a ...


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nude ADJECTIVE ... 1.1 [attributive] Depicting or performed by naked people. ‘she won't do any nude scenes’ Lexico


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Yes, snapshotting is a recognized word! The OED says that snapshotting derives from the verb to snapshot, which in turn derives from the noun a snapshot. [paywalled link] They provide this citation: ˈsnapshotting adj. 1978   Nature   7 Dec. 647/2Mr Sankhala also remarks that the snap-shotting tourist is so preoccupied with shutter speeds, lens ...


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In the phrase "U.S.-China trade," U.S. is a noun: the trade is between the United States and China, two countries, each signified by a noun. If the style you're using, and it's a common one, is to use United States as a noun and U.S. as an adjective, then United States–China would be the style. However, U.S.-China is easier to read and say, and it is readily ...


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