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hash to be replaced with an empty string An empty string = an/any example of an empty string. hash to be replaced with the empty string the empty string = that empty string that has been [or will be] defined; that empty string of which we are all aware.


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Give or take, the statement there can be only one empty string, that is "" could be considered true. It just depends on how deep you want to take that question (what about a variable of string type with a value of null or nil, does a char variable of '' count as equivalent to a string variable ""? (JavaScript would consider this == vs ==...


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I do not know, of course, what your teacher was intending or looking for in the question. However, I would make two suggestions. First, 'Samsung' -- within quotes -- is a company's name. Samsung -- without the quotes -- is a company. This is the distinction between use and mention. In your sentence, you are referring to the company Samsung, not the name '...


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This appears to me as the classic question of definite and indefinite articles. English has two articles: the and a/an. The is used to refer to specific or particular nouns; a/an is used to modify non-specific or non-particular nouns. In your example empty string itself is specified in Python by a pair of double/single quotes i.e "". Hence "...


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"Spanish" is an adjective. There are results of "I am a Spanish...", but there must be something following, such as "I am a Spanish teacher/man/etc.." You can say "I am Spanish", without an article and without something following. "Spaniard" is a demonym, always with an article. "I am a Spaniard." ...


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The definite article is used when speaking of a specific item or items. The only way I can see "the team sports" working is if students (for example) must choose from a list of sports including some team sports. It then makes sense to say that the team sports, meaning the team sports on the list, help in building a good personality etc. Similar ...


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As I studied the origins of grammar in the 18c, I came to understand that most English grammars originated with classical (Greek and Latin) scholars, who attempted to shoehorn English into similar grammatical patterns (declensions, conjugations, mood, tense, voice, number, gender, etc.). One sticking point was to define what is a consonant, what a vowel. ...


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In English these titles may correctly be preceded by articles: “Donald Trump is the President of the United States,” or “The Speaker of the House is third in the line of presidential succession.” Usage of the definite article may serve to emphasize the singularity, eminence, privileges, or authority of the position/title; it can also often signal a ...


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In general, you can opt to leave out the definite article when the job in question has only one incumbent, such as President of the United States. Where the job has many occupants, you should have an article. I am a surgeon. I am the chief of surgery. I am chief of surgery at Memorial Hospital.


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It is absolutely valid, yes, for exactly the reasons you say. "The key" refers to a specific thing, "a key" means one of many such things. Although we often read "the key to success is (whatever)", obviously there are many important things that lead to success, so I look on such statements as dubious. That said, in your example ...


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