27 votes

Did King Charles III use the pronoun "myself" correctly?

This usage is explained in CoGEL (A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language). (CoGEL § 6.27 Optional reflexive pronoun The basic reflexive pronoun is sometimes optional, in the sense that it ...
LPH's user avatar
  • 20k
25 votes

-sen for -self in English: history and usage

It appears to be a dialectal variant from East Midlands where: Reflexive pronouns are characterized by the replacement of "self" with sen (from Middle English seluen): Y'usen – Yourself, ...
user 66974's user avatar
  • 67.3k
16 votes

Did King Charles III use the pronoun "myself" correctly?

The Oxford English Dictionary has many examples of "myself" used like this. I searched only for "and myself". Examples: 1904 W. B. Yeats Let. 16 Apr. (1994) III. 582 Miss ...
GEdgar's user avatar
  • 25.1k
10 votes
Accepted

Reflexive pronoun use when subject is a subset of the prepositional object

If I were the writer, I'd say John bought the tickets for himself and me The reflexive pronoun is better placed after the subject and the verb phrase. Otherwise an even easier workaround would ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
7 votes

'It's for your good' versus 'It's for your own good'

For s.o's good is not used alone in English. Take your medicine. It's for your cold. Take your medicine. *It's for your good Normally it's accompanied by own (a reflexive intensifier) preceding and ...
John Lawler's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Is "Me vs Me" grammatically correct?

"me vs. myself" Versus, from Latin vers, or versa, means facing or towards (imagine two pieces of wood lying against each other). The implication is of competing interests, of which one ...
Carly's user avatar
  • 2,797
5 votes

All along, all I was running away from was "me" or "myself"?

The second option you provided is the more correct of the two: All along, all I was running away from was myself. The "All along" in your sentence is sort of self-contained and doesn't ...
tobybot's user avatar
  • 312
5 votes
Accepted

Who washes 'whomself'?

English doesn't work that way. Who takes himself/herself/themself/themselves as the reflexive pronoun. If you insist on inventing a new pronoun whomself, how would you say Who left their glasses ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Why "him" not "himself"

A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (Quirk et al) explains: The basic reflexive pronoun is sometimes optional, in the sense that it may acceptably be replaced by the more usual 'ordinary' ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
5 votes

Each other’s nose or each other’s noses?

Correct is somewhat subjective here. One version is more logical; the other is more common. Sometimes you must decide between standing on principle and sounding normal. Says one linguist: What about ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 16.5k
4 votes

Who washes 'whomself'?

Your generalization that "the reflexive pronoun should always match its subject" is faulty. There are different types of pronouns, and not all pronouns take matching reflexive pronouns. The personal ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 81.7k
4 votes
Accepted

"I have no sources to back me up" versus "back myself up"

It is, of course, always preferable to use the reflexive where appropriate. However, I disagree that the reflexive is appropriate here; as the sentence is constructed, the sources are providing ...
Hellion's user avatar
  • 59.4k
4 votes

"Including me" vs "Including myself"

The use of reflexive pronouns — compounds of a personal pronoun (my, your, our; him, her, it, them) and -self/selves — is grammatical only (1) when the subject and an object are the same: 07.09....
KarlG's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

To dance oneself

The following Google ngrams show that various [V] [P ref] [Adj]/[to N] (and including other prepositional heads) strings have been used for quite some time. But they also show that these unusual ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
4 votes

Is it normal to say "Allow myself to introduce myself"?

OK, since the moderators haven't migrated this, I'll risk incurring criticism and answer it. He should have said "Allow me to introduce myself." It doesn't make sense to ask another person ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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3 votes

Between youself and I

I feel like if you're trying to sound formal and professional, then this is most succinct and appropriate: "As a result of our previous correspondence" This avoids the issue entirely whilst ...
Artemisia's user avatar
  • 1,408
3 votes

We Indians often say "I finished my homework today itself", which I know is wrong. Which is the correct way to say it?

The word 'today' has the literal sense of 'on this day'. So in American English we would actually treat the word 'today' as self-emphasizing. Simply saying "I finished my homework." without any ...
H.R.Rambler's user avatar
  • 1,588
3 votes

We Indians often say "I finished my homework today itself", which I know is wrong. Which is the correct way to say it?

You could use "on this very day." But I don't believe very many English speakers would use an expression like that to emphasize something as banal as finishing their homework.
joiedevivre's user avatar
3 votes

All along, all I was running away from was "me" or "myself"?

Correct: I was running from myself. Why? "Myself" is a reflexive pronoun 1, which are nouns that are used in conjunction with the word that they describe. Hence, these words reflect the word to ...
dicey's user avatar
  • 138
3 votes

Reflexive verbs

I cannot quantify (and I find it hard to imagine how to, anyway) and I think there will be some debatable cases (as your second example, devote, exemplifies). This short entry, apart from giving ...
anemone's user avatar
  • 6,216
3 votes
Accepted

music can comfort yourself

No. Reflexives are used where the subject and object of the verb are the same: I comfort myself You can comfort yourself Here they are not. Music and painting are the subject of the verb, doing ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
  • 101k
3 votes

"There is a picture of myself on the wall." Can a reflexive pronoun be used without an antecedent like this?

There are many uses for the word myself, and to treat it as only a reflexive pronoun is too prescriptive — so prescriptive, in fact, that it would be wrong. The use you give is indeed accepted as ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 2,818
3 votes
Accepted

How can I rephrase this sentence without "itself"?

In most English dialects, "today itself" would not be used in this way. Instead, if we want to be clear that we are making no assertion about the situation on other days, we'd say: "... today ...
ArchContrarian's user avatar
3 votes

Did King Charles III use the pronoun "myself" correctly?

There are examples of this usage, as mentioned in Strategies for Parents.com:      Is It Correct to Say “and Myself”? You should only use “and myself” when your subject is “I” and you include ...
U13-Forward's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

"send ... both me and ..." vs "send ... both myself and ..."

1) "please send X to both me and Ann" 2) "please send X to both myself and Ann" 3) "please send both me and Ann X [once it's ready]" 4) "please send both myself and Ann X [once it's ready]" ...
candied_orange's user avatar
2 votes

"I feel myself unhappy" vs "I feel unhappy"

The wording "I feel unhappy" is commonplace in English today. "I feel myself unhappy" is, by contrast, rare and sounds odd to many native English speakers. This was not always the ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
2 votes

Sentences of the form "[A] knew this to be [A]'s weakness"

"She knew this to be her weakness." This sentence is completely grammatical, acceptable and idiomatic when "she" and "her" refer to the same person. Unlike some other languages such as Russian, ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 81.7k
2 votes

Who washes 'whomself'?

The long-standing English usage is to use "themself" in this situation. the use of "they" and "them" (and corresponding genitive and reflexive forms) as third person singular indefinite personal ...
michealt's user avatar
2 votes

We Indians often say "I finished my homework today itself", which I know is wrong. Which is the correct way to say it?

Users may be interested in reading a reply in this thread about Indian English. See non-native's reply on Feb 26 '15 at 13:20 about use of only/itself in Indian English. Is 'Single Sitting' ...
Dev's user avatar
  • 31
2 votes

We Indians often say "I finished my homework today itself", which I know is wrong. Which is the correct way to say it?

In some contexts, when there is doubt about the veracity of your statement, you can use do to add emphasis. I did finish my homework today. However, in most cases, you don’t need to add anything....
Alastair Lloyd's user avatar

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