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88

The easiest way to think about this is to compare to he him his: Who gets the benefit? He gets the benefit. To whom does the benefit accrue? The benefit accrues to him. For whose benefit is that? That is for his benefit. For whomse benefit is that? That is for hims benefit. Obviously that last is unnecessary/wrong—in place of hims (or him'...


50

There aren't two different nominative/objective pairs Who -> Whom Whose -> *Whomse, *Whom's, etc. Instead, there's three choices Who - Nominative Whom - Objective Whose - Possessive Who can't be both objective and possessive.


17

Whose is (originally and now) the genitive of who. From Etymonline: whose: genitive of who; from Old English hwæs, genitive of hwa (see who). In all Indo-European languages that I know, a genitive modifies a noun but does not agree with this noun, not even in languages with elaborate paradigms. In other words, the form of the genitive doesn't change when ...


10

A mother takes care of her children. The Original Poster is correct. The word her here is a possessive pronoun in determinative function. The complement or object of the preposition of is the noun phrase her children. The head noun in the noun phrase is children and the determinative is her. The possessive pronoun her and the object pronoun her are ...


7

As I'm sure you know, one of English's "small clause" constructions consists of a subject and a gerund phrase, where the subject may be either in the objective/accusative case ("them leaving was a surprise") or the possessive/genitive case ("their leaving was a surprise"). This is the case even when the subject is a dummy it. Hence, we find the following (...


6

Although I can't give a "formalized" explanation, I wanted to look at using the possessive with personal nouns in the same way that you've done in your examples. Imagine the following situations and example utterances: Situation 1: Your wife, Sarah, is suspected of giving aid to known terrorist organizations. I know my Sarah. She would never be involved ...


6

This is a complicated matter. There exists an unstressed form of my which, because of normal vowel reduction of unstressed syllables, is variously pronounced [mi ~ mɪ ~ mɨ ~ mə] without the normal long diphthong [mɑɪ] which you’re used to hearing. This reduced pronunciation is often heard in the north of Britain today, but it is not strictly limited to ...


5

The fragment does not strike me as idiomatic or even meaningful in the first place. But ignoring that for a moment, yes, you should go with notional agreement. A lot of people and their flag. A variety of people and their flag. A mass of people and their flag. (Oh, and his is right out. A mass is not a he. Ever.)


5

TL;DR: The word her in “A mother takes care of her children” is neither a possessive pronoun like mine nor an object pronoun like me; it is a possessive determiner like my. Just because something immediately follows a preposition does not mean that that thing must be an “object” form. For example: Give the prize to whoever comes in first without ...


4

Because its is a possessive pronoun My head Your head His head Her head Its head Our heads Your heads Their heads Just because its ends in an "s" doesn't mean it takes an apostrophe. To use your example, even though the claws belong to the cat you wouldn't write: The cat licked hi's claws. Similarly, you don't write: The cat licked it's claws. ...


4

Yes, as Peter Shor mentioned in a comment (that he should expand into an answer IMO) the proper pronoun to use is our. I'm sure the people in your story are smart people, so why would they use my instead? In my opinion there are several reasons why they might use my instead of our. I talk about my children using pronouns more frequently when I'm not ...


4

Your test is unfair, because there is no single answer that everyone would agree upon. Everybody, along with everyone, traditionally uses a singular pronoun of reference: everybody must sign his own name. Because the use of his in this context is now perceived as sexist by some, a second option became popular: everybody must sign his or her own name....


3

The "Oxford comma is irrelevant to this question. Saying "my family and crew" implies that the crew is part of the family, not necessarily your crew. Saying "my family and my crew" implies that both the family and crew "belong" to you, which is probably what you are looking for. In addition, unless you are a ship's captain, you may want to use an ...


3

As you note, you can have co-ordinated plurals: You're [Mary and John]'s child You're [the McDonalds'] child You're [the couple who robbed them]'s child All use a phrase and the Saxon genitive. The last one is grammatical but awkward enough to rephrase as You're the child of the couple who robbed them This would suggest that any similar structure is ...


3

Since all of your bullet points starts with a possessive pronoun, just move that up to the top line. That means that you can use a longer phrase, because it's only used once. Encountering a succession of people to observe how each one's way of thinking affects that individual's ● way of looking at the world ● ... ● ... [I've made a couple of other ...


3

The discussion only arises because English grammar uses the term object not only as sentence part (objects after verbs) but unfortunately also as term for word groups (object after a preposition). In my view, a use of the term object which only leads to confusion. As to me, "her" in "her children" is a possessive adjective and it is totally irrelant whether ...


2

"Hers was a good point" on its own is grammatical but literary sounding. It depends on what register you're going for. "Hers was also a good point to include a header specifying the contact person" doesn't sound right. You would have to expand it into two sentences or use a colon as mentioned above.


2

Everyone is a pronoun and means every person or all people. In your example everyone's denotes the possessive form of everyone. Remember that in AmE, it's always singular not plural. So the word following it should always be singular not plural, too. Here are a few examples: He got everyone's attention. Everyone needs him. (not need) Everyone ...


2

The possessive pronouns that end in the sound /-s/ or /-z/, spell it <-s> with no apostrophe (with the exception of whose and one's). However, not all possessive pronouns end in the sound /-s/ or /-z/. In the case of her(s), we use her before a noun, and hers on its own: This is her watch. This watch is hers. Hers is the red one. It is ...


2

Yes, this is grammatical. There is no rule that disallows the use of "your" and "our" in the same sentence: You can find your book in our expanded library.


2

"Mine" is correct, but in this context, I would suggest using an alternative term such as "Personal"


2

You are correct. Mine, as a pronoun (m-w, usage 2), should be used here. My is an adjective (m-w) and requires a noun.


2

Where a gerund-participle clause is complement to a preposition, both genitive and non-genitive subjects are possible: I have no objections to [their/them taking notes]. She insisted on [my/me being present at the interview]. So, both your examples are fine. It's essentially a free choice between genitive "their" and non-genitive "them", though the ...


2

"She knew this to be her weakness." This sentence is completely grammatical, acceptable and idiomatic when "she" and "her" refer to the same person. Unlike some other languages such as Russian, English does not have a reflexive possessive pronoun. In most cases, we just use the usual possessive form corresponding to the grammatical person (and in third ...


2

If you are using the noun phrase young me to describe yourself in the past, then adding an apostrophe and s to form the possessive would be normal. Young me was quite precocious. Young me's toys were all red. Having said that, it's unusual to use young me in the first place. More typically, a variation would be used: When I was a child, all of my ...


1

Since mine is a possessive, it would need to be matched with a possessive when used in same as. You could use it if you wrote Your situation is the same as mine. But if the element that same as refers to is a noun/pronoun, then you need to use a noun or pronoun as well to keep them consistent. So it should be You're in the same situation as me.


1

Did you both move into the same house? In that case the house is singular. "Her and my" or "our" are possessive adjectives. Either expression would be grammatically correct. As a matter of usage, if Sue is your wife, for example, then it would be usual to say "our". If Sue is merely an acquaintance, and each of you part owns the house, then "her and my" ...


1

I don't think my and our are necessarily the same. If I say Our family eats turkey New Year's Eve, I mean that my family including me but if I say My family eats turkey New Year's Eve I may be referring to the rest of my family but not me. Our implies a potentially closer affinity between the speaker or writer and the group.


1

Yes, it's okay to use "my" for the simple reason that it's not incorrect. It might be incomplete, and there are many weak signals that you might infer from the choice. As for what's more appropriate, shifting from "my" to "our" is more appropriate when the other person is involved in the conversation rather than just being nearby. I can imagine that with ...


1

The first form, with inversion, is the 'canonical' form for questions. The second form, with no inversion, is typical of "echoic" questions, which repeat the substance of a previous speaker's assertion with interrogative intonation, and usually with one term emphasized and possibly replaced with an interrogative, in order to request confirmation that the ...


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