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In Early Modern English, the nominative (subject) form of the second person plural was ye. The rest of the forms of the second person plural are still in use: you (objective), your (genitive), your (possessive). "Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you, and ordained you, that ye should go and bring forth fruit, and that your fruit should remain: that ...


2

As an alumnus of the Haberdashers' Aske's School, I say with some certainty, there is no rule that you can't have two possessives before a noun. But why is this OK and "our today's meeting" not? In this case, the possessives qualify in a chain - Robert Aske was a freeman of the Worshipful Company of Haberdashers, thus "Haberdashers' Aske", and the school ...


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In English, the possessive (or genitive) case denotes "ownership, measurement, or source," and is marked by 's. (ThoughtCo, "Possessive or Genitive Case"). Once you mark something in the possessive case, it is possible to nest the noun phrases even further: the boss's dog (the dog owned by my boss) the coworker's boss's dog (the dog owned by the ...


1

No apostrophe is needed. "Interests" is the subject of the verb "triumph". We favor inter-agency collaboration in order to ensure that our clients’ interests triumph. If, on the other hand, you wished to ensure the triumph (as a noun) of the interests of your clients, it could be possessive: We favor inter-agency collaboration in order to ensure our ...


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I would argue that if it is one team you are speaking of, the correct form is "team's time" If you are referring to multiple teams, then "teams' time" The word itself is in singular form, not its plural form (that would be "teams"), even though a team usually is comprised of multiple individuals. Other similar examples: "Congress's time" "the committee'...


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